salvia ID? sp. from Guatemala

voodoobrewJune 8, 2010

Does anyone know what the salvia in the link below might be?

Apparently in blooms in winter/ late spring in CA.

Thanks

Here is a link that might be useful: unnamed salvia

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wantonamara Z8 CenTex

How do they know if it is super rare if they don't know it's super rare name?

    Bookmark   June 9, 2010 at 12:46AM
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voodoobrew

LOL. There are quite a few that are still called "sp. from XYZ", waiting to be named, if you look at Robin's site. So I was just wondering if anyone recognized this one. This seller sells very nice plants, including many rare salvias (probably from Cabrillo College!), so my feeling is that they are reputable.

    Bookmark   June 9, 2010 at 1:46PM
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robinmi_gw

This looks like something being sold in Wales by Crug Farm Plants, again not named. Could possibly be a hybrid with Salvia karwinskii being involved. So many un-named Salvias and hybrids around currently, many of mine just have SALVIA ? on the labels!

    Bookmark   June 9, 2010 at 2:13PM
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rich_dufresne(z7 NC)

Salvia curtiflora might be it, or a related species. Does the buyer offer the plant's provenance? This would make the plant much more valuable to collectors.

    Bookmark   June 9, 2010 at 9:29PM
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robinmi_gw

I think Rich is correct....Salvia curtiflora. (Not to be confused with the beautiful Salvia curviflora.)

    Bookmark   June 10, 2010 at 5:13AM
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jonopp

Looks like S. curtiflora to me! I had one in the Mission that got huge - 10 feet+ - and bloomed only once... I think it needed a little more warmth - or at least less wind!

    Bookmark   June 10, 2010 at 2:20PM
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voodoobrew

OK, so it sounds like I should plant it in a sunny spot, away from wind, then! 10 feet+... oh boy, my resident hummingbirds are already fighting enough as it is! LOL

    Bookmark   June 10, 2010 at 11:22PM
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rich_dufresne(z7 NC)

Depending on the foliage, I'd perhaps give it some shade. If the foliage is smooth, this is an indication of shade-loving. If the foliage is hairy, this indicates tolerance of sun. The hairs reflect excess sunlight.

    Bookmark   June 11, 2010 at 10:30AM
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jonopp

'Scuse...Yes! it's a shade-lover! I meant warmth, not sun! Think of some still, mild-all-night place in Mexico...in a shady thicket.

It'll want some water, too.

    Bookmark   June 11, 2010 at 5:48PM
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voodoobrew

Yes, the leaves are somewhat hairy. I have it in part shade now, just to acclimate it to my garden after shipping stress. I have a spot it might like... on a slope next to 3 redwood trees, so it wouldn't get all the redwood mess (due to slope), yet that area is partly shaded, and fairly heavily watered. No more drought for us, right? :-)

Jonopp, was curtiflora a winter bloomer for you in S.F.?

    Bookmark   June 11, 2010 at 6:02PM
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voodoobrew

OK, I have another salvia ID question. This one is from Costa Rica, on the cover of a book of plants. Anyone know which salvia it is? see link

Here is a link that might be useful: Salvia sp. Costa Rica

    Bookmark   December 28, 2010 at 2:16PM
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hybridsage

Voodoobrew:
Looks like a species fushia from what I can see.
Art

    Bookmark   December 28, 2010 at 4:03PM
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voodoobrew

Yes, now that I take a closer look at the calyx, it doesn't look like a salvia. But the flower sure did! The leaves look a bit like a salvia I saw (not in bloom) recently at UCBerkeley which was labeled only "Salvia sp. Costa Rica". Still wondering what that was.

Interesting species fuchsia, if that is what it is. btw, we have been looking at options for a Costa Rica trip, hopefully for this spring.

    Bookmark   December 28, 2010 at 4:56PM
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hybridsage

Sounds like a great trip. I guess it is safe for Americans??
Keep us posted!
Art

    Bookmark   December 28, 2010 at 6:57PM
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rich_dufresne(z7 NC)

The flower looks like it could be from an Acantaceae, or possibly a Rubiaceae species. Both are found in Mexico and Central America. A closer look at the calyx would tell much. A lot of species from these families have Salvia like flowers.

    Bookmark   December 28, 2010 at 8:59PM
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voodoobrew

Thanks for your replies. Art, Costa Rica is probably the safest country to visit south of our border. The main purpose would be to see wildlife, but also plants, of course! :) The Monteverde cloud forest is well-known for both.

Here is a link that might be useful: Monteverde

    Bookmark   December 29, 2010 at 7:19PM
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