Staking zucchini, height?

commgardener11March 4, 2011

I'm considering staking 2 to 3 zucchini plants (Black Beauty) in my community garden plot, and I'm wondering if any of you have tried this with success before?

Did you have to tend your plants on a daily basis to keep them growing correctly?

About how high did your plants grow?

Would 1sq ft be enough for a staked plant, or should I allow more?

Thanks!

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
engineeredgarden(7, nw Alabama)

I've only used tomato cages turned upside down to keep my plants in close quarters - but still allowed them a 2ft x 2ft space to grow in. Besides, only 1 square foot of soil isn't enough for the plant roots to thrive - regardless of what the book says..

EG

Here is a link that might be useful: My square foot gardening blog

    Bookmark   March 4, 2011 at 11:12PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
commgardener11

Thanks, EG. Allowing enough space for roots never occurred to me. I like your idea of using the upside down cages... That'll shave a foot 1ftx1ft off the growth space!

    Bookmark   March 4, 2011 at 11:44PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ribsyhuggins

i wll ask mels when hear him speak Saturday march 12

    Bookmark   March 5, 2011 at 8:20AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
momstar(5)

I tried staking zucks for the first time last year. I also had an un-staked one in another bed to see the difference. The un-staked one took over 3x3 easily. In fact, it overflowed the edges of the raised bed. The staked one was 2x2. It was on the edge of the bed too so some of it overflowed.

The experiment was successful for me and I will be staking them from now on. I used a 4 foot T-post (which made it about 3 feet after I pounded it in). Definitely suggest putting the post in and THEN planting the zuck.

I used cut up panythose to tie the plant to the post and it worked well. I didn't have to tend it every day. I checked it maybe twice a week, especially during the time when the plant was growing quickly. Once the plant slowed down I only had to adjust the ties maybe every other week. By then I was picking fruit every day so it was easy to see when the plant needed attention.

One added benefit is that it makes it easier to see and get to the fruit. It also makes it easier to see bugs and get them before they damage the plant.

I may try the upside down tomato cage this year as an experiment.

As always, YMMV.

    Bookmark   March 5, 2011 at 2:32PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
commgardener11

Wonderful feedback, momstar! I'm glad you mentioned the height of your "vertical" zucchini, as there is a restriction of 6ft in the community garden, and I don't want to come in there my first year and shade everyone out or get all crazy with growing everything vertically the way I'd *really* like to. 3ft seems a really reasonable height...

I think I'm beginning to get a little over my head in attempting to have over 100sf of raised beds as my first real garden, so I think having a sprawling plant may actually ease things a little, lol... I'm saving your post for next year, once I have the hang of things, and REALLY want to cram a lot in the garden. Thanks!

    Bookmark   March 6, 2011 at 1:40AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
alouwomack(Zone 7)

Hi Commgardener11,

I enjoyed growing my yellow squash staked upward last year. Momstar is who helped me find the original link about how to stake squash and zucchini.

Here is the link to our conversation last growing season . . . I posted some pics along the way that might be helpful too.

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/sqfoot/msg0514444811976.html

Good Luck!

Amber

Oh and by the way . . . I wish I'd given each squash 2 squares or at least a space in between each one. It became more difficult to get to the main stalk and attach my pantyhose strips once the plants became so large. Don't forget to consider what is planted right next to them either. Those leaves will intrude well beyond that one square!

    Bookmark   March 15, 2011 at 3:17PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
snibb(Salt Lake City)

you can definitely grow black beauty zucchini in only one square foot...I do it every year and have pictures to show it. Grow it straight up and tied to a tee post at 8" intervals and you will be good...

    Bookmark   April 18, 2011 at 12:48AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
commgardener11

Hey, EG! How do you keep your upside down tomato cages from toppling over? I just realized I put my cages in the regular way, and will need to fix this weekend. I browsed your blog pics, but couldn't tell how you do it... Thnx!

    Bookmark   April 22, 2011 at 6:01PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
momstar(5)

EG
I tried the upside-down tomato cage this year. It was wonderful!! I like staking them last year but the inverted cage is so much easier. I just made sure the first leaves were over the wire and as the plants grew I lifted the next layer of leaves over the next wire. Now they are upright and holding their own. I don't have to keep tying them like I did with the stakes.

I didn't have to anchor the tomato cages. Even with some pretty crazy wind the last few days, the weight of the plan is holding things down just fine.

I will continue to use the tomato cage method from now on. It makes it easier to grow yellow or zucchini squash in a 2x2 square. And it is easier to harvest too.

    Bookmark   August 17, 2011 at 1:32PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
staining wood for raised beds.
I'm wanting to build a raised bed and first went out...
johnmcd348
Looking for bloggers
I am looking for folk interested in writing about square...
Andrew_Green
Mel's Mix versus 100% Compost
Hello all, I am starting some boxes for growing. I...
bsntech
Safe insecticide: Olive Oil, Dish Soap, Water
I'm going to try a safe insecticide first before going...
travelsfo
Watery soil under raised bed
Hey all, I am new to raised beds, just started construction...
jazz1234
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™