Grow japanese maples in the southwest?

mucknmire(zone6 NJ)July 17, 2005

Is it possible to successfully grow japanese maples in the southwest? We're thinking about moving to Albuquerque or Las Cruces and would like to grow japanese maples but don't know if anyone has tried growing them there.

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adp_abq(7b NM)

You'll be fighting the alkaline soil and the resulting chlorosis that this tree will inevitably get. Maples in general don't do well here. This type of tree apparently is also shallow rooted . Not a good fit.

Click on link for list of recommended trees for the abq. area.

Here is a link that might be useful: albuquerque recommended plant list

    Bookmark   July 17, 2005 at 11:45PM
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mucknmire(zone6 NJ)

Thanks for the information. I didn't know that the soil was alkaline. Probably too much sun too since jmaples are understory trees. I guess I'll have to grow them as bonsai if I want them. Also thanks for the Albuquerque plant list!

    Bookmark   July 19, 2005 at 1:04PM
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Crumpet(SW)

Actually they do grow in Albuquerque but in very select locations........sheltered from hot sun, and drying winds. I see them often in courtyards and other protected areas, but not out in the open. And forget the real finely cut leaves or the red colored plants. Not a general all purpose plant, but one that will be OK if you are willing to give it a sheltered location and combat the iron chlorosis that will always be a problem.

    Bookmark   July 19, 2005 at 11:13PM
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adp_abq(7b NM)

Here's another link that may be helpful. If you like small trees then there are many desert or desert adapted trees to choose from like:

new mexico olive/privet (shrub or tree)
desert willow
redbud
screwbean mesquite
mexican elder
smoketree (purple leaves)

Here is a link that might be useful: another link from nmsu for abq

    Bookmark   July 20, 2005 at 9:40AM
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mucknmire(zone6 NJ)

Crumpet,
Thanks for the info that you can grow them in a sheltered place. But now I don't know if I want to go through that much trouble to grow them. I guess it's best to grow native plants adapted to the climate/soil conditions rather than trying to grow something from a totally different environment. Pretty trees tho so I may give it a shot if/when we get out there.

adp_abq
Thanks again for the list of small trees. Glad to know the redbud grows there. We have several in our yard here including the dark purple "forest pansy" and we love them. Thanks for the nmsu link.

    Bookmark   July 20, 2005 at 10:00PM
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adp_abq(7b NM)

mucknmire:

I've lived in both cities (currently in abq) so if you have any questions about them let me know.

    Bookmark   July 20, 2005 at 10:52PM
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paalexan(NM)

"I guess it's best to grow native plants adapted to the climate/soil conditions rather than trying to grow something from a totally different environment."

It's a whole lot easier, that's for sure. And I figure getting to know the local plants is a good way to quickly gain an understanding of and appreciation for your new home.

Patrick Alexander

    Bookmark   July 21, 2005 at 4:13PM
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