Anyone have PICS of Staking Yellow Squash?

alouwomack(Zone 7)May 12, 2010

Hello all! I've read and asked a few questions before about the design of my beds . . . I love to hear suggestions from other gardeners!

I mentioned the staking of squash and was offered a few old posts/threads that were very beneficial. It was certainly enough to get me growing and staking!

Now, I'd like to ask for good detailed PICS from anyone who could provide!?!?

I'll be posting mine soon to show my progress--photobucket is blocked here at work. I have 3 yellow (straighneck) squash that are doing fabulously.

I'm curious how tall they'll get with this vertical method?

Does anyone ever trim the very bottom leaves to allow for more space around them for neighboring plants (if desired)? The stems are hollow -- leaving me with worry whether or not to cut.

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momstar(5)

I'm not sure what old posts/threads you have reviewed but the one below is detail instructions and pictures of snibb's method of staking summer squash.

There are pictures way down in the post of the whole garden with staked squash and also farther down there are pictures of the stake/rope technique snibb uses.

I am trying this on two summer squash this year as an experiment.

Here is a link that might be useful: staking squash

    Bookmark   May 14, 2010 at 12:44PM
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alouwomack(Zone 7)

Hi Momstar,

Thanks for the link. Someone referred me to this before but I don't see much detail in the pics. I suspect some of the photos are blocked by my computer at work...I can't always see the photos. I'll check the link from home just in case.

How is your experiment working so far?

I'm doing the t-posts on all 3 of my squash. The bottom leaves are really intruding on surrounding plants, so I thought about trimming a few stems off but I'm worried about disease and pests!

Instead of using a rope to tie the stem upward, I'm using strips of pantyhose. Its working very nicely; I also like that I didn't have to deal with a bunch of rope laying around my pretty beds.

    Bookmark   May 14, 2010 at 1:08PM
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alouwomack(Zone 7)

Well, here's my progress so far:

Instead of rope, I'll be adding a strip of thick pantyhose as needed; I like the stretch it provides while still being strong enough to hold the weight of big plants--like my tomatoes. I did end up trimming a few of the bottom leaves off because of the other plants surrounding the squash. (I'll provide more space next year.) I hope that I'm not setting myself up for bug problems by cutting on the plants . . .

As with any gardening, it will be a surprise to see what happens! Oh, I think I should've purchased taller t-posts too!!

    Bookmark   May 14, 2010 at 8:40PM
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angela12345(7b NC Mixed-Humid)

How tall are the t-posts that you bought ? I have 3 foot (I think). I dont remember that the actual stalk part (the part I would be tying to the stake) got taller than that last year. That length posts were substanially cheaper than the next size up ... they were only about $1.87 each. If the yellow squash do get taller, they will just have to grow up past it or maybe flop over a bit at the top.

    Bookmark   May 17, 2010 at 9:40AM
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momstar(5)

Beautiful! I am so jealous.

My experiment so far is this: I have planted the seeds and I've driven the T-post into the ground next to them.

Last frost date was Saturday (yippee). I haven't even seen a sprout come through yet. Still kinda early here in zone 5.

I actually cheated and gave the staked squash a 2'x2' square on the corner of the bed. I figure if it gets out of hand it can have leaves hanging over the edge of the bed and that won't shade or crowd anything else. to the side of it I have planned Habanero pepper and to the rear I have planned tomatoes in cages (kinda cages....another experiment). I also planted backup squash in other beds and gave them the full 3x4' space I usually give them.

Since I really am not hurting for every square inch of my square foot beds I can afford to let them sprawl out. I have 6 beds 4'x8' each plus some containers. I'm not a hardcore square footer, more like an intensive raised bed grower.

    Bookmark   May 17, 2010 at 11:27AM
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alouwomack(Zone 7)

Hi Angela,

I think the t-posts I purchased are 4 feet tall . . . I do remember that they were quite a bit more expensive the taller they got. It will be interesting to see how "tall" the squash grow.

and Hello Momstar,

I have all 3 squash / 1 per square on the 2nd row from the front. I've cut a few of the leaves back that were smashing my dill and basil. On the backside of the plants are 4 squares of cowpeas; they don't seem to mind the occasional squash leaf crossing over here and there; the tomatillo is getting a bit cramped on the east side of the squash but I think the afternoon relief from the setting sun might be worth the trade off. It sounds like you're squash set-up is well on its way! They grow so fast once they sprout and your soil stays warm; I think 2 square feet will be much easier to handle since you'll need to get in and around the plant to keep it staked.

    Bookmark   May 18, 2010 at 11:57AM
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momstar(5)

Whooot!

Checked last night and I have a sprout! I haven't staked it yet though. lol I think I'll let it get just a little bigger before I start that.

    Bookmark   May 18, 2010 at 1:45PM
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alouwomack(Zone 7)

Congrats on the little sprouts momstar! My plants were pretty large before I added any support. They are doing great and growing upright like it is natural for them.

    Bookmark   May 20, 2010 at 10:34AM
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momstar(5)

That's great. How did you keep the pantyhose from slipping down the support stake? You cut it in strips but what direction? Around the leg making a loop or length wise from toe to hip in strips?

My sprout is still small but with the weather finally turning I'm sure it will be ready for support in no time.

    Bookmark   May 20, 2010 at 4:21PM
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alouwomack(Zone 7)

Hi Momstar,

I didn't use the torso part of the hose; I suppose you could though. After I cut the legs off (sounds funny to say), I cut the legs making several loops. This seems to work nicely in case you want to leave the loop whole or cut it to make a longer but thinner strip. The t-posts I'm using have holes every so often that I'm threading the hose thru. I've noticed there are little hooks/notches on the top part of my stakes but not on the bottom half; I figure I'll use the notches when I get to that point but either way the posts have holes throughout the length of itself. Do yours have holes? I hope so! If not, the rope might be the better way to go.

-Amber

    Bookmark   May 21, 2010 at 12:01PM
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