mushroom compost problem

hooked_on_lightsMay 29, 2010

I recently bought some mushroom compost from a dealer here in Cookeville...something I will NEVER do again...the compost, not the dealer. I mixed it bagged topsoil and used it in two different projects and now have the same problem in both areas.

There are two different kinds of mushrooms coming up. One has a top about the size of a dime and is not a problem. However, the other has a very slender stem with a tiny top that seems to immediately be covered with a black gooey substance that transfers to the other plants and is killing them. The nursery thought a fungicide would work and seems to help, but new ones come up every night. The bigger problem is that one of the projects was 530 individual mini vinca plants. I drilled about a three inch hole in the clay, filled it with this mixture and now every morning I'm faced with checking each plant and removing the mushrooms with the black gooey substance on them.

I've started the very laborious task of digging each plant up, getting my mixture off the plant's roots and out of the hole and replanting in something different. Are there any suggestions as to something that will kill the mushroom fungus without killing my other plants?

Thanks for any help.

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brandon7 TN_zone(7)

Sorry I can't offer much help. Most mushrooms are harmless to plants, but certainly not all (some of the Armillarias come to mind). Any chance of pictures? Also, keep us updated if you can.

If you can provide samples and enough info, you might get some suggestions from the local ag extension office.

Here is a link that might be useful: Putnam County Ag Extension Office

    Bookmark   May 30, 2010 at 10:18PM
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hooked_on_lights

Here is a picture of the problem mushrooms.
Yesterday I tried an experiment. I went through about 70 of the mini vinca plantings and either dug up and replaced the soil if the plant was in bad shape, or simply took about a half inch of soil off the top of any plants that showed new growth and otherwise looked ok. I marked those that used the second method and none of them had the mushrooms this morning, although with the weather conditions last night, there was not a lot of mushroom activity this morning, so at this point my experiment is inconclusive.
My theory here is this:
When I orginally planted, I drilled a hole in the clay that was about three inches wide, put some of a half topsoil/half mushroom compost mixture in the bottom. Holding the plant and root system upright, I added more of my mixture around the sides and then a layer of the mixture on top surrounding the plant. This is what I took off yesterday. My theory is that I have taken the concentrated area at the top. Yes, there is still some around the edge of the roots and underneath, but I eliminated a good portion of it without having to dig everything up and replant. I will know better in a couple of days.
I still would like to know if anyone has any ideas to kill the mushroom spores/fungus without killing my plants.
Thanks for any help,
Cliff

    Bookmark   May 31, 2010 at 1:17PM
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