Hanover tomato seed

tandrew31February 25, 2014

I am trying to get a few (5-10) seeds of this variety.Does
anyone know of a source?

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tandrew31

I have been told there is no such variety,that the Hanover
tomato is actually many kinds of tomatos grown in the
soil of Hanover VA that produces the flavor that is popular
in that part of VA.
Does anyone know if this is true?I feel silly trying to find seed of a non existing variety if this is true.
Comments appreciated , especially from Virginians from
this area.

    Bookmark   February 25, 2014 at 11:52AM
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carolyn137(z4/5 NY)

The link below confirms what you said.

The label Hanover has been given to almost ANY kind of tomato, hybrid or OP, that many vendors sell.

All attributed to the kind of soil they all are grown in.

Carolyn, who was going to link to a general Google search for Hanover, but I think the link below says it all.

Here is a link that might be useful: Hanover, not just one variety

    Bookmark   February 25, 2014 at 2:18PM
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farmerdill

It is true of the "Hanover" tomato. However it is possible that a backyard breeder may have developed a round red and named it Hanover. Hanover county was once the truck garden to Richmond and supplied fresh tomatoes as far away as the Baltimore market. It is getting caught up in urban sprawl now. Hanover was never trademarked like Vidalia. Thier fame spread by word of mouth. When I left the area in the 60's Pik Red was popular. Early varieties were grown to try to be first on market.

    Bookmark   February 25, 2014 at 2:55PM
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Deeby

What does truck garden mean?

    Bookmark   February 25, 2014 at 9:27PM
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farmerdill

In pre WWII days vegetable market gardeners were called truckers. Their farms were called truck gardens. They were in general small farmers within 10-20 miles of a large city, to which they hauled thier vegetables to market in season. Did not have mass intercontinental and international shipping in those days. some of the old terms persist as in the corn Trucker's Favorite.

    Bookmark   February 26, 2014 at 7:48AM
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carolyn137(z4/5 NY)

And I was raised on a truck farm in upstate NY.

My grandfather had bought 90 acres from the Shakers in 1905 for 5K, sold 45 of those in 1906 for 6 K, paid off the debt and so we farmed 45 acres.

We'd pack the truck at night after packing tomatoes and peppers and squash and lots of other stuff, my father had to get up early, at 4 AM to get to the lineup at the central wholesale market. And he had a bad back so yours truly often had to get up with him, and when parked in the stall,, had to get up on the truck bed and pull forward the baskets of this and that while the wholesalers went down thru the cental aisle, looking for the best of what was available at a price they were willing to pay.

I'd hear the ruck going out early from home and if dad retured pretty quickly we knew he'd sold out, but there were many mornings when he didn't.

Ah, memories.

Carolyn, who HATED cutting spears of asparagras, but the bunching of it wasnt so bad. But loved climbing the peach trees on a wooden ladder with a burlap bag and leather strap. Nothing more wonderful than getting up high in the tree and picking a few of those fruits,big and warm from the sun, oh so delicious.

    Bookmark   February 26, 2014 at 11:14AM
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Deeby

OK, thanks, and what does sharecropper mean?

    Bookmark   February 27, 2014 at 10:58PM
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farmerdill

Exactly what it says. A share cropper did not own land, but farmed someone else land on shares. Normally 1/4 of the crop. That was upped to half if the land owner provided seed etc. It was popular in post civil war south, where much of the land was lost by southerners who could not pay the taxes. Some large land owners used tenant farmers who were provided a house and a small salary ( in my youth $15.00 a month) to work on the landowners farm.

    Bookmark   March 1, 2014 at 8:13AM
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Deeby

Thank you. Oops, I didn't mean to hijack the thread !

    Bookmark   March 1, 2014 at 1:24PM
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