No rambling roses here

tropicbreezentJuly 4, 2012

Of course saying roses here wouldn't have "a snowflakes chance in hell" is a bit of an understatement. So the job of 'rambling' has to be done by other plants.

And to paraphrase another saying, 'One man's house plant is another man's garden plant'. This thread shows some of the potential of a number of the vining/climbing/epiphytic plants which some people are used to seeing as house plants and others here have as garden plants.

They are a bit like kids kept indoors - confined, subdued, looking longingly out of the windows.

But when released into the outdoors they explode into a riot of fun and activity. Except, no noise! What a blessing!

So here's some photos of my rampant climbers, not in any particular order other than the sequence they were taken.

The first is Philodendron erubescens, a reasonably fast grower but not overwhelmingly so. Once it clumps up on a tree trunk it looks quite nice.

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tropicbreezent

It isn't a fast grower but is still moves along. Can't remember this one's name, I think it was something like Philo. "Black Knight", but don't quote me on that. It isn't a fast grower but is still moves along.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 2:22AM
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tropicbreezent

Next is Golden Pothos, my second most prolific rambler. The tall trees in the photo are between 20 to 25 metres tall, the Pothos is up around the 18 to 20 metre height and still moving up. In the fore ground are 2 palms with their trunks entirely covered with it.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 2:24AM
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tropicbreezent

Syngonium is my most invasive one, although it doesn't get up as high as the Pothos. This is a young plant with juvenile leaves. Later the leaves become more palmate.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 2:25AM
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tropicbreezent

Philodendron tenue. Not a fast grower but the leaves get quite large. This is still a young plant.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 2:26AM
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tropicbreezent

When first bought, Philodendron pedatum was a much darker colour but growing in a lot of shade seems to have made it paler. The stems and petioles are sort of furry. Looks quite good. Still in its pot but once it puts out a lot of roots by-passing the pot I'll cut it off and move the pot to another place so it can start a new one.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 2:27AM
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tropicbreezent

A native Epipremnum pinnatum from Queensland. You can see the juvenile leaves right up the top of the photo and the adult leaf at the bottom. This is another I'll cut off from the pot and get a new one going somewhere else.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 2:28AM
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tropicbreezent

This one's called "Little Monster" because it resembles Monstera deliciosa but it's not closely related at all. I've forgotten the proper name. It grows much faster than the large Monstera.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 2:29AM
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tropicbreezent

A view from further back of the Little Monster and its surrounds.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 2:31AM
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tropicbreezent

Philodendron melanochrysum. Once it gets properly established the leaves get quite a bit larger,

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 2:32AM
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tropicbreezent

This side of the palm trunk is Amydrium zippelanum. When the plant is on ground level it sends out thin runners which sprout a few leaves along the way, probably to provide an extra bit of nourishment for the runners. When they find a suitable tree they go up and then establish a mature plant. Seems an adaptation to a plant falling with a dead tree then having to find a new tree to grow on.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 2:33AM
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tropicbreezent

Once Pothos gets right up into trees this is all you see below. Thick stems going up the tree trunks. The Pothos stems are 25 to 30 millimetres thick.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 2:34AM
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tropicbreezent

The taller the plant the larger the leaves. So you only get a close up view of big leaves when they eventually fall. This one is 73 centimetres along the mid rib.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 2:35AM
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tropicbreezent

An Epipremnum with some Syngonium growing through it. I'm not sure but the Epipremnum might also be a pinnatum, but different variety to the Australian native one.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 2:36AM
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tropicbreezent

Philodendron lacerum. I had a huge one on a Coconut, but a couple of years ago lightning hit the Coconut (plus 5 others nearby) cooking them all and the Philo. Luckily I had a few other plants around the place and have put more cuttings around as insurance against further lightning strikes.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 2:37AM
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tropicbreezent

And Syngonium again. This area will probably have to be cleared out a bit as it will end up smothering other plants.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 2:39AM
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denninmi(8a)

Wow, amazing photos. Where is this? Making a guess, I would say somewhere in the tropical part of Australia, perhaps Queensland?

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 1:40PM
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tropicbreezent

Thanks Denninmi. It's actually near Darwin. In north Queensland they have a lot of rain to keep this sort of stuff growing. I need more irrigation, but it still works.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2012 at 9:05PM
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garyfla_gw(10 Florida)

Hi
better keep a close eye on them lol Even here in florida where the climate is marginal they get way out of hand They strangled several of my trees. We had a very mild winter last year and the syngonium actually flowered for the first time. When you prune be sure and pick up even the smallest cutting as it will sprout again lol
So pretty when small but so gross when large lol gary

    Bookmark   July 5, 2012 at 5:02AM
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Tiffany, purpleinopp GardenWeb, Z8b Opp, AL(8B AL)

...so some of our house plants DO have ideas about taking over the place! I knew it!

Really enjoyed your pics!!!!

    Bookmark   July 5, 2012 at 12:15PM
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garyfla_gw(10 Florida)

hi
?? about the fan shaped leaf in last pic. Is that some type of Licuala palm?? Looks like it might be a L. ramsayi??gary

    Bookmark   July 6, 2012 at 4:53AM
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tropicbreezent

Gary, I've spent quite a while ripping down Syngonium, putting it in plastic bags and placing those in my large chest freezer. That's the only way to really kill it off. Their flowers are certainly nothing special. The fan palm in the last photo is Licuala spinosa, my L. ramsayi are smaller.

Purpleinopp, they are everywhere, and they're watching and waiting for their chance .... LOL.

    Bookmark   July 6, 2012 at 11:44AM
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garyfla_gw(10 Florida)

Hi
Isn't it odd how thiese type of vines leaves get larger as they gain height but will immediately revert to small when on the ground?? Have nothed with pothos that it can grow several feet maybe indefinitely with small leaves but if you attach it to a tree the very next leaf will be 4 time larger!! Put it back on the ground it will revert again lol adaptation to get up where the sun is I guess??
Syngonium is even more remarkable as it changes color as well as shape of the leaf. Flowering for me was remarable in that it had not done it in over 20 years !! Sure hope the seeds are NOT viable lol gary

    Bookmark   July 8, 2012 at 3:37AM
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tropicbreezent

Gary, aroids are notorious 'shapeshifters' as they go through different ages. This is what makes them so difficult to identify. Many of them gained a variety of names when taxonomists studied and named the plants at different ages. The change in Pothos leaf size as they climb (and mature) is quite dramatic. The vines that those same plants drop back down to the ground have tiny leaves again.

    Bookmark   July 11, 2012 at 9:04PM
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