Mangoes of Hawaii

squam256May 23, 2010

Hello everyone, I just got back from a trip to the Big Island of Hawaii. Of course while I was there I had to sample the local farmers markets and made sure to try out some of their mangoes.

The island is absolutely loaded with mango trees, with most of them being the so called "Hawaiian common mango", which I believe is some variety of Turpentine. The most common named variety is unsurprisingly Haden (always spelled 'Hayden' over there), but they have a number of their own unique varieties not found in Florida, where many of us mango enthusiasts live.

I tried about 5 named varieties that are not found in Florida (these I got from a knowledgeable grower):

Sugai - small yellow fruit, shaped and looks like turpentine. Was told it would be fibrous but wasn't bad, had a typical sweet flavor...probably some kind of turpentine cross.

Mapulehu - shaped just like a Zill mango with the distinctive pointed beak, relatively small size and color is yellow/orange. Taste is like a cross between a Glenn and a Jakarta...somewhat insipid like Glenn but a detectable resinous flavor reminds me of Jakarta. No fiber in flesh

Momi K - shaped like Haden, tastes like a Zill mango. No fiber

Pope - this one actually originated in Florida. It was bright red one side and green on the other, and shaped like a Kent with similar size. Texture and flavor was very similar to Haden.

Kurashige - kidney shaped and orange color, medium size. Flesh was pretty fibrous but flavor was very rich and sweet. May have had the best taste of the named varieties.

Top row (from left): Mapulehu and Pope

2nd row: Momi K, Mapulehu, and Haden

3rd row: all 3 are Haden

4th row: these were mangoes from a basket marked as Hadens by their sellers, but were obviously not Haden (this seemed to be a common theme at the markets there). I bought them anyways. Pretty sure the 1st one was Edward and 2nd Carrie, no clue on the 3rd. All were very good.

Ate the Sugai and Kurashige before I took the picture.

Also adding a link to a poster that shows some of the mango varieties on Hawaii:

Here is a link that might be useful:

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murahilin(10 fl)

Cool. Did you save the seeds or bring back any budwood with you? Get to try the Rapoza?

Do you really find the Glenn to be insipid and the Jakarta resinous? I love those two mangos.

    Bookmark   May 23, 2010 at 9:00AM
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mango_kush

im growing a St. Maui mango that im pretty sure is from hawaii, its labled by fairchild as "pacific/indo-chinese"

if hawaii mangos are so good why do they have so many Florida cultivars :)~

im still looking for this Goliath of Hawaii, Golden Queen Mango

    Bookmark   May 23, 2010 at 9:59AM
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jsvand5

I am really interested in the Rapoza. Did you see any of those over there? I am going to keep checking with frankies until they have it in stock.

    Bookmark   May 23, 2010 at 11:48AM
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squam256

Rapoza is apparently a later season mango, so there weren't any ripe ones available.

Did not bring back any budwood or seeds.

Murahlin, Glenn can be insipid depending on how much rain it gets....Jakarta is without a doubt resinous in my experience. Some people like Jakarta a lot, I still think its decent.

    Bookmark   May 23, 2010 at 1:01PM
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mango_kush

i want to bump this because i noticed Trop topicals has a good St Maui mango picture with a vague description

Mangifera indica - St Maui Mango
Rare variety, St. Maui mango is from Hawaii, referred to as "pacific/indo-chinese". Rich flavor, sweet and juicy; fiberless. The variety is well adapted to humid climate.

    Bookmark   November 2, 2010 at 6:45PM
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jeffhagen(10B)

Regarding the glenn mango, it must depend on where it's grown. I've had glenn mangoes from a several trees grown in typical south florida sand/limestone 'soil', and they've all been absolutely delicious. However, I'll bet that glenn mangoes grown in muck would have a different flavor.

Jeff

    Bookmark   November 2, 2010 at 8:34PM
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tammysf(9b/10a or sz15/16)

i have to agree with jeff....i just had a glenn grown in california with no rain during the summer and it was sweet and tangy...not watered down flavor AT ALL.

i actually find manilla mangos kind of boring and watered down and my glenn was better than the manillas in the stores.

    Bookmark   November 10, 2010 at 12:18AM
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