What's a Large Red Cherry?

digit(ID/WA)April 9, 2007

You couldn't think of a more generic name unless it was just "Red Cherry." Large Red Cherry leaves me clueless.

It is very healthy and productive in my garden. I must have grown this tomato for over 10 years before I realized that it isn't a hybrid. But, is it an heirloom?

Are these the cherry tomatoes we could find in our supermarkets 50 years ago? Are they still an important commercial variety?

I'd appreciate any ideas you have on this variety.

Steve

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trudi_d

Large Red Cherry is what it is....it's a fine tasting OP cherry tomato. Seed packs can be purchased this time of year at many dollar stores or discount retailers for as little as ten cents a pack.

It is an important "commerce variety" because the seeds are available so cheaply...there are still many people who need to supplement their table with homegrown veggies. These low cost seeds germinate at high percentages and greatly reduce seed costs for a family.

    Bookmark   April 9, 2007 at 5:04PM
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seedboy

Large Red Cherry is a variety I will never grow again. It was gross. So what if it's cheap? Spend a dollar more and get a package of Super Sweet 100 or Sungold seeds. Better yet, get both....

    Bookmark   April 9, 2007 at 9:45PM
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HoosierCheroKee(IN6)

Unless I'm mistaken, Large Red Cherry is a variety from Ben Quisenberry's collection as were Brandywine (Sudduth), Big Ben, Stump of the World and several other venerable oldies.

    Bookmark   April 9, 2007 at 10:42PM
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gonefishin(z7bTx)

I bought one plant at H.D. because I only had one cherry tomato and one on the way, I had read that it was a good O.P. like Trudi said and the plant looked very sturdy and healthy. If I like the taste and think that it measures up, I can save some seeds.
Bill P>

    Bookmark   April 9, 2007 at 11:57PM
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digit(ID/WA)

Bill, I don't think it will knock your socks off - sturdy and healthy may be the best way to describe the fruit, also. They have an enjoyable measure of flavor - at least it is to my liking. I could say a lot more about their consistent reliability and yield.

Hoosiercherokee, I believe you are right! I did a little searching and Ben Quisenberry is credited by more than one source. Of course, they may have all gotten their information from each other but some of these folks are likely to have known Mr. Quisenberry.

Seedboy, I have grown a few tomatoes, including many of those that you probably believe surpass Large Red Cherry. I won't argue that there are sweeter and finer tasting cherries. This year, some of them will be growing along side the LRC's again in my garden. So, no, I haven't limited myself to one or 2.

Trudi, I am reassured by your judgment on their flavor. I enjoy a good number of varieties. And thankfully, I've had good germination with most everything I'm growing this year. I am truly looking forward to tasting some of them for the 1st time, seeing some of them growing for the 1st time, or just welcoming back old friends.

Steve

    Bookmark   April 10, 2007 at 1:00AM
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trudi_d

Hi Steve! I was looking at the ten cent rack at WallyWorld yesterday and I saw LRC...it was on my mind because I have distributed the seeds in the past.

Seedboy, I don't think we've met, I don't post here too often in the winter but once I start sorting my seed packs I am here more frequently. I promote inexspensive gardening methods. Adding on a dollar or two to every pack of seeds doesn't pencil out for people on a fixed income. This forum, the other veggie forums, SCM and IPM are read by some people using library or school computers--they are looking for information on best practices for veggie gardens because for many, this is not a hobby, it's a neccesity.

These forums become very valuably resources when we share our best practices or information on no-to-low cost methods. As an example I've written a few times about my Mom who never owned a tomato cage but simply planted her beefsteaks in front of an arborvitae and shoved the stems up into the tree for support. Dollar Store seeds are standard OPs which perform reliably where they are sold. The varieties can be limited--that is true--but the flavor is there as well as the nutritional value.

T--who must go outside soon and turn more compost into more beds--in the spring its seems never ending.

    Bookmark   April 10, 2007 at 8:01AM
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gonefishin(z7bTx)

Very well said Trudi and a good point well made. Some of those people are not frugal by choice and really need the reliable producers that they can count on. Hobby gardening as an interesting pastime to relieve boredom is probably the furtherest thing from some of their minds. I can understand that because I am a Senior on a fixed income. While I am perhaps more fortunate than many because I have my own home, garden, and occasionally a little spare change, like most I am concerned with inflation with the cost of things like utilities, gas and groceries outstripping any cost of living increases.

Taste is subjective of course, and not everyone likes same thing. I have heard it said, or read somewhere that "Hunger is the best Sauce!". I know from experience that there is a lot of truth in that one.

Keep up the good work.
Bill P.

    Bookmark   April 10, 2007 at 9:03AM
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john90808(z10 So Cal)

I hope this doesn't come across as too obvious or a dumb question, but is this cherry tomato from Ferry-Morse (see link) the same one that is being discussed on this thread?

Here is a link that might be useful: Ferry-Morse Red Cherry, Large Fruited

    Bookmark   April 10, 2007 at 10:04AM
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trudi_d

The only difference I believe is that the name includes the word "fruited", but otherwise I think they are the same. The two variations I know are Large Red Cherry and Red Cherry Large. With heirlooms that have a "micro" distribution the name difference might indicate different fruits, but this is a widely distributed variety and is quite common so I think these are all the same variety with slight proprietary name differences.

T--who certainly is not an expert on the name history of tomatoes but appreciates practical human nature.

    Bookmark   April 10, 2007 at 10:25AM
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onoffexitramp

I think they are two different varieties. I have grown both and there is a marked difference between them.

    Bookmark   April 10, 2007 at 12:26PM
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spiced_ham(z5 OH)

Maybe seedboy phrased his feelings in a strong manner that offended some of you so let me rephrase it.

"I found the taste very disappointing, and much better varieties are available for a little more money."

Now in rebuttal to the reply against his phraseology.

One pack of seeds yields twenty or more plants (more than you can plant in one year), and from each plant innumerable seeds can be saved for the years to come. Each plant yields several pounds of fruit, each worth $2 at the supermarket. Fixed income or not, any argument about the difference two or three dollars makes for one pack of tomato seeds is silly. If you have access to the internet you can do searches to find better tasting tomatoes that are good producers.

    Bookmark   April 10, 2007 at 12:27PM
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trudi_d

Where would you shop online for them if you don't have credit? The shipping costs more than twenty packs of veggie seeds from the dollar store.

Where would you buy these seeds if you can't afford a bus outside your district?

How could you buy them if you couldn't afford the two dollars?

Life is HORRIBLE for a lot of people.

    Bookmark   April 10, 2007 at 1:29PM
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veggiecanner(Id 5/6)

I'll put my vote on them cause I like the LRC also I am finding the 10 cent seeds to be better than some of the other store bought seeds.
I;ll grow several plants this year. It's nice to have a plant that produces ripe fruit in my garden. Beat the heck outta the cherries that crack and fall off the plants before I can collect them.

    Bookmark   April 10, 2007 at 3:55PM
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barkeater(Z3b VT)

I believe Large Red Cherry is a true heirloom dating back to the late 1700's.

    Bookmark   April 10, 2007 at 4:46PM
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trudi_d

Really? Wow. It makes you think about the antiquity all of these very common, tried and true varieties that are offered in the dollar store packs. Our ancestors, going back more than a few generations were eating crookneck summer squash or storing acorn squash hundreds of years back. Our heirlooms are more than a link to our heritage, they are connected to our survival as people.

    Bookmark   April 10, 2007 at 7:04PM
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seedboy

"I think they are two different varieties. I have grown both and there is a marked difference between them."

Well, that might explain why I thought they tasted horrible. I'm actually referring to the Ferry-Morse "Red Cherry, Large Fruited" seeds and not to what might be a different variety.... I grew the Ferry-Morse seeds two

    Bookmark   April 11, 2007 at 1:47AM
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snappybob(SaTexas Zone 8)

I have been growing the "Large Red Cherry" for at least 25 years and have never found another cherry tomato that I like as well. They are very prolific and tasty. I must admit I didn't know they were an heirloom.

    Bookmark   April 11, 2007 at 9:46AM
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digit(ID/WA)

A varied response, which is somewhat as I expected. Thank you all for sharing your history with LRC. (You know, Bob, if we grow them long enuf, they turn into heirlooms. ;o)

Steve

    Bookmark   April 11, 2007 at 11:05AM
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booberry85(5)

I had good luck last year with some of the 10 cent seeds. So I'm trying more of them this year. I have started my tomato plants for this year and have had better germination rates with the 10 cent seeds than some of the "more established" seed producers. For 10 centers I'm trying Red Cherry, Rutgers and another I can't remember off hand.

    Bookmark   April 11, 2007 at 7:07PM
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mari_mari_mari

I must say that I am a very poor single mother/college student/laborer. I have absolutely no idea how to grow tomatoes but I'm trying this year (which is why I found this forum). I do depend on these inexpensive 10 cent seeds to keep my family fed. The only reason I haven't tried tomatoes in the past is because the 10 cent pkgs were always sold out before I could get some. This year all they had for seeds were Large Red Cherry and tons of Radishes. My poor kids will have to feast on mainly radishes for another year.

Anyways, I'm glad I found this place and hopefully by reading the various posts, I will eventually figure out what I'm doing with these tomatoes. I only bought one packet, so if all else fails, I'm only out my 10 cents + soil.

    Bookmark   April 14, 2007 at 12:05AM
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trudi_d

mari mari mari,

Please use my page link and email me your address. I have plenty of tom seeds and would like to send you some. My treat on the postage.

Trudi

    Bookmark   April 14, 2007 at 7:32AM
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neonposey(z7 NC)

mari mari mari: i can't find a link for your email. I also have plenty of veggie seeds I can share with you. Please send me an email with your addy and I'll get them right out to you. Also my treat on the postage. Between trudi and I you can have a huge veggie garden this year. :)

    Bookmark   April 14, 2007 at 8:11AM
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SirTanon(z9 AZ)

I have plenty of different seed I can share with you as well, if you like. Email me with your info and I can send some to you. As with Posey and Trudi, postage will be my treat. Nothing like helping out a fellow gardener :)

    Bookmark   April 16, 2007 at 5:36PM
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gonefishin(z7bTx)

I have noticed that Bonnies plants at H.D. have both a Large Red Cherry and a Huskey Red Cherry. Is there a difference, or are they just being called different things.

Trudi, neonposey and sirtanon, your compassion and generosity are remarkable and I am sure that many members would join with you if the need were there. However, from looking at the date of registration and lack of other info, I wonder if someone is rattling your cage, yanking your chain and pulling your leg.
Bill P.

    Bookmark   April 16, 2007 at 9:22PM
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trudi_d

Human Nature is what it is. I will be optomistic Bill. Some people don't own computers and must post from work, school or library. Much of the Northeast was impassable because of the storm and many worksites, schools and libraries were closed because of flooded roads or buildings. Also, many people are proud people and they muddle through on their own with their heads held high ;-) God bless them all.

    Bookmark   April 16, 2007 at 9:45PM
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SirTanon(z9 AZ)

Bill.. I've posted this elsewhere, but I'll repost here in explanation to your question about cherry red and HUSKY cherry red:

--------

All THREE of the Husky series tomatoes - Husky Red, Husky Gold, and Husky Cherry Red - are a very compact, tree-like semi-determinate with RUGOSE foliage.. but foliage-type aside, all three are quite nice for container growing. Considering they fall under the ISI category (Indeterminate, Short Internode), they will continue to produce fruit all season, but will stay quite compact, and don't require MUCH staking. Read that as "fairly self-supporting, but a stake or small cage wouldn't hurt."

--------

So basically, in answer to your question.. Cherry red is basically your standard indeterminate plant producing red cherries.. and HUSKY cherry red is essentially a 'dwarf' that produces red cherries.

Given the choice, I think I'd probably grow the husky variety, but that's because the compactness and reduced maintenance requirements are both of real value to me. Both are very nice.

    Bookmark   April 17, 2007 at 1:33PM
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gonefishin(z7bTx)

Thank you sirtanon, I do appreciate it and was just curious. I did not buy any of the Husky red cherries.
Bill P.

    Bookmark   April 17, 2007 at 5:21PM
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deweymn(z4mnstpaul)

mari, mari, mari....
Welcome to this site. I'm fairly new here myself and an experimenter. Hopefully you will get some seeds from fellow members. In the meantime, search thru many forums here and pick up some hints. You can make your own potting soil, compost pile, garden tools, and garden area just by following your instincts.

You can also make it a learning experience for your kids if they are old enough. (A two year old can turn the soil and set a plant etc.). Any container with drainage and care can become a nursery if placed in sunny window and cared for. A discarded waste basket can become a container to hold plants. The oven can turn yard dirt into decent planting soil. You will find all the info you need here if you got the time to search. Good luck.

I have seeds from American Seed that I got last fall by asking my hardware store guy what he was going to do with that seed rack and the left over seeds packets. He said, "they are yours if you want them." Yup, I did. Email me with what you would like and I will send them to you.

Tomatoes are the easiest to grow, I think, and the best tasting veggie around. I gulp a handful of Large Red Cherry tomatoes everytime I pass the plants.

    Bookmark   April 18, 2007 at 9:39AM
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californian

With regard to Husky tomatoes, what does Rugose foliage mean? I bought a sixpack of tomato plants at Home Depot that were labeled Sweet 100 cherry tomato, but the plants don't look like sweet 100 and are very compact with extremely dark green, healthy looking foliage. On another visit to home depot I saw some plants that were labeled Husky red cherry and they look like the one I planted. All of the plants have tomatoes on them, and the biggest ones look bigger than sweet 100 tomatoes. I assume these are hybrids so it is not worth saving the seed.

    Bookmark   May 13, 2007 at 10:36AM
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trudi_d

Think of the root of the word ~ RUG. Where have you heard that before? I ask you to think about that because it will help you visualize what rugose is.

Rugged--that which is not level, having observable courseness.

Corrugated--imagine a cross-section of corrugated cardboard. Cor is the heart (corornary arteries bring blood from the heart.) The core is the centre of things. Corrugated Cardboard has a center section which is not smooth or flat.

Rugose means "not smooth".

    Bookmark   May 13, 2007 at 12:04PM
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gonefishin(z7bTx)

At any rate, the Large Red Cherry tomato that I put out in the garden is looking great and has several on it, and many more blooms.
Bill P.

    Bookmark   May 13, 2007 at 5:25PM
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trudi_d

Right! Make me jealous Bill! Harummmph.

T

    Bookmark   May 13, 2007 at 9:12PM
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gonefishin(z7bTx)

Right! Eat your heart out Trudi! Actually, I am way behind most of these other Texas mater growers, and I thought that it might well illustrate those rug ed leaves you so eloquently described. ":^)
Bill P.

    Bookmark   May 13, 2007 at 9:20PM
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gonefishin(z7bTx)

As a bit of an update, I continue to be well pleased with the Large Red Cherry. The is growing like a weed and it continues to put on of tomatoes.

My only attempt at rooting cuttings failed last year, but Kristi was kind enough to encourage me to try again with more detailed instructions. So, I thought that this vigorous plant might be a good candidate and cut a sucker off and plopped it right into some most potting soil. That was around noon yesterday and this morning it does not even look . If this works and it roots, I will try it again with a Big Beefsteak that looks like it may be prolific with big Toms.
Bill P.

    Bookmark   May 18, 2007 at 12:34PM
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SirTanon(z9 AZ)

Bill,

That Large Red Cherry plant you have there looks more like a Husky Cherry Red to me.. very rugose foliage and a fairly compact habit.

Perhaps there was a mixup at the store?

    Bookmark   May 18, 2007 at 2:31PM
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gonefishin(z7bTx)

Well Sir, that is always possible, but in just those few days it has already grown above the top of the cage and seems to be just getting started. It would not be the first time that has happened. I bought a six pack of pepper plants last year that was supposed to be sweet banana peppers, but they did not even resemble the sweet bananas. Either way, I am eager to taste some ripe maters off it to see whether or not to save seed.
At this point it does seem very healthy, vigorous and looks like it is going ot be prolific.
Bill P.

    Bookmark   May 18, 2007 at 3:01PM
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deweymn(z4mnstpaul)

Just came in from watering and was looking up some old post and ran across this one.

I started Large Red Cherry Tomatoes from seed again this year. Too many maybe. I have them in containers and in the ground. The ones in the ground are already 6' high even tho I spread the vines out and tie them up. The fruit is almost the size of table tennis balls on some clusters and should be ripening soon.

For taste, I think they are a good addition to the table. I use them in salsa, salads, and in omelets and I think they are superior to the red cherry variety. I also have no cracking with them as I did with the smaller variety even tho I reduced watering.

I luv LRC's.

    Bookmark   June 28, 2007 at 9:46AM
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HoosierCheroKee(IN6)

Dewey, hmmmm ... seems a tennis ball size tomato exceeds the common notion of "cherry tomato." How long have you been perpetuating this particular Large Red Cherry?

Bill

    Bookmark   June 28, 2007 at 10:21AM
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jwr6404(8B Wa)

Bill
Ping Pong,when I was a young hoosier, used to be referred to as table tennis. Perhaps Dewey was referring to Ping Pong Ball size fruit.

    Bookmark   June 28, 2007 at 10:59AM
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HoosierCheroKee(IN6)

Oh yeah, JWR, I read Dewey's post too fast ... missed the "table" in "table tennis balls." I love those size cherries ... the saladette size ping pong balls. Wonderful!

Bill

    Bookmark   June 28, 2007 at 11:27AM
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gonefishin(z7bTx)

Mine are , but have a really good taste when fully ripe. Even those not yet quite to the peak are delicious when you just pick them off the vine in the garden and pop them in your mouth and chomp. I really like them better cut in half and sprinkled with salt, but that is just my preference.

The sucker cutting that I rooted and put into the ground is and has blooms, but they are tiny, much smaller than those were on the parent plant at this point.
That may be just that they have not really got those roots down into the "good stuff" well, yet, or the incessant rains that have plagued us for going on the 20th day in a row, pretty often two times per day. are detrimental to them.

The seedlings that I started from seed that I saved from some of the first ones (they have a lot of seed in them) are also and the leaves look like the parent plant.

As Arnold once said "I'll be Bach" (if we all don't drown)!
Perhaps I need to take a cue from that new movie just out, which looks like it is going to be funny, and start building a big ark. If that comes to pass, and He will let me, I am going to leave some of the worst insect pest off the boat. ":^)
Bill P.

    Bookmark   June 28, 2007 at 12:47PM
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deweymn(z4mnstpaul)

ping pong ball is what I meant. I was in a hurry and wasn't thinking and used the old terminology for ping pong.

I wish they would ripen so I could pop one in my mouth on the way to work. And, make some salsa.

    Bookmark   June 29, 2007 at 3:15AM
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tomatogreenthumb(6 WV)

I have grown Large Red Cherry for a few years now........they are extremely large vines with tremendous production when well-grown. About 1 1/4 inches in diameter. The only complaint I have with them is that they are just a tad on the sour side for my taste buds. I like a sweeter tasting mater, but that's just my personal preference.
I have found an OP unnamed red cherry that is same size, and just perfect tasting though; not quite as vigorous producer, but the increased sweetness makes up for it.

    Bookmark   June 29, 2007 at 10:04AM
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deweymn(z4mnstpaul)

Dewey screwed up again. I looked tonite. I have a LRC plant that is growing quite well next to a purple tomato plant. The purple has some nice fruit that is now taking on the plumb shape and I mistook some of these for the LRC fruit. The large Reds are not as big as I posted. Good size but most are half the size of a ping pong ball.

I am going to use a few cuttings from the purple russian that I got from a church sale and see what I can get from planting them. I might root them and try a few in the upside down container style as well as in a new area. I think they will add some zest to salsa etc?

    Bookmark   June 30, 2007 at 6:26AM
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deweymn(z4mnstpaul)

Checked on the garden today and on a cut off stump between my tomato plants was a LRC all nice and red with a couple of small bites taken out of it! Now where did that squirrel find a ripe one? Nice of him/her to leave it for me to see. So I got down on my hands and knees (not that easy anymore) and looked in the two plants nearby. The purple russian plant has nice fruit setting but no red ones and this one was round, over an inch in diameter with no cracking.

And there at the bottom was a nice red cluster of three and an empty stem. So, I harvested these and brought them in to the DH. Of course I popped the reddest one in my mouth first. They were delicious. I measured one of them and it was over 4" around and a little under an inch and a half diameter. Not quite ping pong ball size but pretty close I think. And, there were a lot more like that on the one plant. Checking other plants I think I will have some roma and beefsteak coming shortly. Good cause I just bought two BS at Cub for $1.05 @ 99Cents a pound. Red cherries were going for 2.99 a pint. My tomato habit would break me if I didn't grow my own.

How are yours doing in Z4? BTW, no cracking which is why I switched to the LRC variety.

    Bookmark   July 4, 2007 at 5:40PM
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deanriowa(4b)

I picked 10 ripe ones last night and had them in a salad. They tasted great. They are not as sweet as some cherries but nice full flavor. I will definitely be growing some of these next year.

Note: They produced before my early girl tomatoes.

    Bookmark   July 12, 2007 at 2:08PM
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monicadow_gmail_com

I know the last post on this thread was in July '07, but I have to comment. This summer I planted ONE large red cherry that I bought at home depot. It's now 6 ft high and more than that around... and still growing. The main plant is tied to a 5' high metal trellis. Some branches are growing into a lilac bush, some into my very strong agastache, some into the neighbor's bush. A few of my fellow gardeners at the community garden have suggested that I prune it but I can't because, frankly, I'm in awe of it. It's obviously trying to take over my garden. The fruit is tasty and not thick-skinned, smaller than campari tomatoes but just as fine for salads or eating directly off the bush. Last year I had sweet 100s and I found them to be too sweet (duh), and too small and thick-skinned. I will definitely plant another Large Red Cherry next year, but in a different part of the garden where I can trellis it on three sides!

    Bookmark   August 6, 2010 at 9:06PM
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peachgrove

I enjoy the flavor of Large Cherry Red and that's coming from a guy who grows 30+ varieties of maters each year so can compare. Is it the sweetest of the cherries? No, flavor is more or less "tomato" with a nice texture but at times that is preferred. The one thing I love about this variety is the fruit size... Over an inch!!! Which makes for easy picking. I tend to let sweet 100s rot on the vine simply because they are too small. High yields. I have picked over a gallon a week in peak season And reliable... I first grew these for a 4-H project 30 years ago in northern illinois and now growing in the Southeast with equal success year after year, even last year when sweet 100s and chocolate cherries and I candy all failed to bear.

Now to address the other issue in the comments. Large Cherry Red is an excellent choice for both people of fixed income and people of novice garden experience because it is so reliable. And no reason not to get the 10 cent packet... For some the choice isn't between a 10 cent packet a $1.10 packet, or $2.00 per pound from the produce department but a10 cent packet and not having fresh produce at all. I am a professional and sell both seed and plants, it is not uncommon to interact with people who don't have the 10 cents for seed that are humble enough to ask for help. I give seed away when someone asks and seed left at the end of the season goes to a local ministry which distributes them to people in need as it takes pressure off the food pantry. The one person I will always remember was an unemployed single mother who asked if I could spare some seed, who's primary interest wasn't food production (though a very important aspect of her request ) but so she could let her young daughter have a sense of pride and security in having food they could produce themselves, something that wasn't a hand out. For people in that circumstance, a variety like Large Cherry Red which is very prolific and reliable and good flavor is ideal

    Bookmark   January 24, 2015 at 10:21PM
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seysonn(8a WA/HZ 1)

Last year I grew a large red cherry (description, not name) from a store bought Heirloom. It turned out as semi-det. , a plus form me. It wast juicy and meaty at the same time. Good size for salads or just to eat off the hand.
So I no longer grow small red cherries like sweet 100 which has HUGE plant and TINY fruits.

Seysonn

PS: Edited to add pic.
Heirloom Cherry Tomatoes from Trader Joe

This post was edited by seysonn on Sat, Jan 31, 15 at 13:05

    Bookmark   January 25, 2015 at 5:04AM
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digit(ID/WA)

Fun!

Well, I shall go back and read every post from nearly 8 years ago.

It makes me feel good to see words and thoughts from gonefishin' Bill P., and others.

Steve

    Bookmark   January 25, 2015 at 9:45PM
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john11840(z6/CT)

I've grown large red cherry for the last 10 years. It's great, and 1 plant will keep a whole neighborhood supplied.
John A

    Bookmark   January 31, 2015 at 11:09AM
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suncitylinda

Great thread! Actually, I have about 5 Large Red Cherry babies just now popping up! I'm looking forward to it. =)

    Bookmark   February 1, 2015 at 2:02AM
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bragu_DSM 5

It's good to see the successes, and not so successful things people have tried to grow over the years. It's fun to see folks add yet-another-variety to their yearly grow lists.
As always, YMMV: what works for some may be a challenge to others.

dave

    Bookmark   February 1, 2015 at 2:31PM
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Deeby

PeachGrove, your post of love and kindness has brought tears. God bless you and thank you for all that you do.

    Bookmark   February 1, 2015 at 4:35PM
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Hi- There's a guy locally that is selling rabbit manure...
DrMario
T-5 Grow light question on seedlings that just germinated
I should no this by now, but seedlings with out true...
thebutcher
Critique Varieties please for 2015
My garden each year seems to expand here in N. Indiana...
hoosier318
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