What to do with the low branches on mango?

sapote(10a)August 11, 2014

My Cat-Hoa-Loc, a suppose to be very famous Vietnamese variety I bought from TopT this spring, is sending many low new growths closer to ground, but above graft line. The top also has two new big branches. Should I cut off these low new growths or just leave them alone to help build up the root system and the trunk? They are just about 1" above the graft line which is about 1" above the ground. Here are some photos. I'm sure a normal properly prune tree should not have the 1" off the ground branches. What should I do?

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sapote(10a)

A close-up photo

    Bookmark   August 11, 2014 at 6:44PM
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tropicbreezent

I'd trim off the low ones and let the top go. The low ones just become a nuisance.

    Bookmark   August 11, 2014 at 9:26PM
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GreeningTheDesert

Speaking theoretically! I'd air-layer them and make them into more new trees.

Ask the experts first if at this stage they can hold up, and the main trunk can survive the procedure.

    Bookmark   August 12, 2014 at 10:07AM
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sapote(10a)

Those young branches are too tender for grafting or air layer. I just cut them off last night and felt sad. I should have cut them off when they were 1", instead of 8" healthy looking mango. I didn't cut them off because I was thinking more leaves meant more energy gain from the sun for the tree, but now I agreed that those lower water sprouts will slow the top main growths.

I very much water all the mangoes every day now in 80's degrees. No more burnt leaves as I had before.

    Bookmark   August 13, 2014 at 3:38PM
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sapote(10a)

I learned that air-layering is agood way for more Longan and Lychee, but bad result for citrus and mango since the root system will be so weak that the young trees just sit there for many years doing nothing. Graft to a root stock is the only way for mangoes and citrus.

    Bookmark   August 13, 2014 at 8:04PM
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tropicbreezent

Wed, Aug 13, 14 at 15:38
I very much water all the mangoes every day now in 80's degrees. No more burnt leaves as I had before.>>

That's lower than our winter temps, LOL. But I agree about the airlayering. Your grafted plant would do better on the rootstock it was attached to rather than its own. Which is why it was grafted in the first place. To airlayer would be going backwards.

    Bookmark   August 14, 2014 at 5:58PM
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sapote(10a)

"To airlayer would be going backwards."

I'm not sure this is generally true for all fruit trees, since I have yet seen a Lychee or Longan that has root stock grafting -- they all are air-layered. I think some plants do very well with air-layer and some don't, hence we have many different propagation methods.

    Bookmark   August 14, 2014 at 8:06PM
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tropicbreezent

We were talking about airlayering your mango, not other fruit trees.

    Bookmark   August 15, 2014 at 9:23AM
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