California transplant seeks info

lios389(7)August 5, 2007

I have spent the last 25 years gardening on the central coast of California. The Sunset Western Garden Book was our bible out there. Is there a "bible" for Eastern gardening? If anyone has any recommendations for books, publications, web sites etc... it would be most appreciated.

Thanks!

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gardener_sandy

Virginia Tech has loads of information in their publications available online. Here's a link...

Here is a link that might be useful: VA Tech publications index

    Bookmark   August 6, 2007 at 9:12PM
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lios389(7)

Thanks - that is indeed a lot of info. It doesn't take much time to figure out that there will be a lot more bugs to learn about. I have already noticed that even though it may be hot as hades, things don't dry out as quickly as they do in the West. Though I also imagine that means more chance for diseases to take hold too.

    Bookmark   August 8, 2007 at 11:57AM
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DWA in AZ Sunset zone 12(9a Tucson AZ)

Not sure what part of Virginia you're in. Here in northern Virginia we have northern and southern characteristics intermixed.
One book I've used for years is not regionally specific: Barbara Damrosch's Garden Primer. A recent acquisition that is currently my most-consulted is Tracy DiSabato-Aust's Well-Tended Perennial Garden.
Southern Living,the southern equivalent of Sunset, has an encyclopedic garden guide. Also look for Adrian Higgins, a Washington Post garden columnist. All should be available at your public library for evaluation.

You might enjoy books by Henry Mitchell, who wrote the Earthman column for many years, for a perspective on challenges of gardening here.

Green Spring Garden, a Fairfax County garden whose purpose is demonstrating what grows here, has an informative web site with lots of lists, including notes on how specific cultivars have fared. http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/parks/gsgp/gardening.htm

    Bookmark   August 19, 2007 at 8:42AM
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the_virginian(Zone 7 NoVA)

You might be interested to know that even in Northern Virginia you can grow three types of palm trees-yes, palm trees outdoors. The dwarf palmetto (Sabal Minor), Needle Palm (Rhapidophylum histrix) and Windmill Palm-has up to a 20 foot trunk (Trachycarpus fortunei). We also can grow as a perrenial a cold hardy banana, Musa Basjoo. Check out my website as it might give you some ideas.

Here is a link that might be useful: Panama John's Tropical Zone

    Bookmark   August 22, 2007 at 11:17AM
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