Gypsum and Worms

yolos - z 7b/8a Ga.March 17, 2012

I am getting ready to build 10" raised beds in my garden. I would like to work some gypsum into the red georgia clay that is currently in my garden before I add the raised beds on top of the clay. I am trying to prevent waterlogged beds and allow deep rooted veggies to penetrate the clay if needed.

But I am also trying to attract native worms to the beds. Will the addition of the gypsum to the clay prevent the worms from coming into the beds or harm the worms that will be added when I add my compost to the beds.

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11otis

by james ellison:
http://jellison.wrytestuff.com/swa15796.htm

Just spread it on the lawn, using the granular type, with a lawn spreader at the rate of 40 pounds per thousand square feet. Gypsum fertilizer can be spread any time of the year and only one application per year is needed. To get it started working, water immediately after applying. If applied properly it does not affect the pH of the soil, not harmful to humans and your animals and will not burn. And because Gypsum is neutral and will not change the soil pH, you can use it in places where plants like Azaleas, Camellias, Rhododendrons and other acid loving plants grow, they need a little calcium too. Of course, gypsum should be applied per directions.

    Bookmark   March 18, 2012 at 12:54AM
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