what are your Top 5 Mango varieties?

tammysf(9b/10a or sz15/16)December 8, 2009

it is so awesome that we have some members that have been lucky enough to no only try but grow so many different varieties of mangoes.

what are YOUR top 5 mango variety for whatever reason? it can be the taste, productivity, disease resistence, growth habit.

name them...

i have VERY little (almost none) experience but so far my top 2 that I am getting excited about would be my lancetilla and glen.

i have not tried them yet but they are fast growers.

hopefully i will have more to add in the next few years.

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andrew78(6)

Tammy,
I am in the same boat as you, not to much experience but i am hoping to gain some knowledge from you because you are doing the same thing even though we live in diffrent zones. Can I see an update on all your mangoes? You could post it here or email me. Just curious. By the way, I am VERY pleased with Julie which I bet will make it some where in your top five list. I have never heard a bad thing about Julie's flavor, and I bet it would be a good grower for you with your lower humidity.
Andrew

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 12:07AM
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tammysf(9b/10a or sz15/16)

Hi Andrew,

let me see if i can locate the images i took of my mango trees...it was awhile ago so i may have already posted them.

this is of my glen..i wish i had pruned this right when i got it but i was pregnant and lazy....

this is my lancetilla...it was much taller but i cut off almost 2 feet when i got it to make it smaller and more compact.

the stem is actually around 9 inches before the first branch so the tree is taller than what it appears in this pot...the pot is only 1/2 full of soil.

all of my mangoes are in pots and were really neglected. in feb i left them outside, uncovered when i went on vacation and they got pummelled by a hail storm that blanketed the neighborhood...i came home from mexico to my plants totally shredded. the carrie and icecream have not done much of anything since i got them. i pruned them to sticks with a few leaves...so i will have to wait and see if they survive but now i want an edward mango so if one dies i get to replace it ;)

i will probably plant my lancetilla and glen in ground in the spring and see how they do.

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 12:58AM
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andrew78(6)

Hey Tammy,
Congrats on your baby. Your Glen looks very nice, but I think you could prune it now if you wanted. I wouldn't swear buy it but I lve the red color on the leaves! How long after you got your Lancetilla did you chop it? I am agonizing over this! I know I should wait a while but I got a little worried with over watering and I actually let the Lancetilla dry out more than i should have. The poor tree lost about 7-8 leaves but I think it is ironic that it lost its leaves where I want to cut it. I can see buds on the top growth and as soon as they show any signs of growth, I am chopping it off!! I wish nurseries would take it out of the condo category, after seeing Harry's pic. there is no wayit is a condo but I wanted it because I figured if it was as vigorous as most people say, then maybe I can get fruit faster. I know you won't have to wait near as long as I do. I am hoping that maybe this summer I can try my first Julie from my tree. It is fairly large. Harry said his is 6-7 feet and mine is 4.5. I know it needs to grow wider, but I can't wait. Cogshall is a ways away. Thank you for giving me your input on Ice Cream. I checked out Pine and they have changed there mango viewer. I looked at the pic of the Ice Cream fruit and they are pretty small. The fruit fit in the bottom of a hand! Glad I changed my mind. You should check out the pic of the Lancetilla fruit. Someone put a $20.00 bill on the fruit and I could not believe how big it really was!! I will let this tree grow as large as possible. I ddon't care if I have to hook up the tree to the back of my car to move it!! Those fruit are so huge. I am so excited, I can't wait!! How tall is the Glen now?
Andrew

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 1:49AM
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mostro(jax/9a)

Hi:
Most mangos I really really like are heirloom varieties local to Santiago in Cuba, but I've had some Florida/Miami grown fruits (variety not known) that were very good and large. The fruits I've gotten from the grocery store are usually quite terrible...

A couple of years ago I bought a Julie mango tree and planted it in my yard. It did not perform very well at all! In two years it only put out new growth one time and I eventually pooled it out and through it in the trash. Has anyone had something like that happen with Julie mango trees in Florida?

My two seedling mango trees grow very well, so I think their was definitely something wrong with the Julie, what a waste of greenÂ

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 11:27AM
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andrew78(6)

MOSTRO,
What happened with you and your Julie is typical for most people in Florida. The anthracnose from what I have heard is the big problem. It slows growth and mango production. That is typical for Julie in FL.
Andrew

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 11:45AM
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puglvr1(9b central FL)

I'm not a Mango expert, but I've read that Julie does NOT do well in FL because of our high humidity, its prone to anthracnose and fungi problems.

Read about it below from Pine Island Nursery.

Tammy, you will LOVE Glenn, it is one of the best tasting mango I've ever had! Very sweet, smooth and fiberless, very flavorful IMHO. I am still waiting to taste Cogshall and Lancetilla...I've had Keitt before also very good!! The Keitt doesn't have the pretty colors when it ripens though, I've eaten them green. I had a Keitt tree in my old house 6 yrs ago! They are very lanky trees but the fruits were HUGE!!

Here is a link that might be useful: About Julie Mango...from Pine Island Nursery

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 3:08PM
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jsvand5

Of what I have tasted my favorites are
1. Julie
2. Carrie
3. Nam Doc Mai
4 Ataulfo
5 Marathon
Wasn't a fan at all of Mallika (actually threw the last one away) but I know a lot of people love them. Glenn was just Ok for me. Maybe it was due to the weather when they were getting ripe, but my Glenn's were kind of watery tasting and did not have the stong sweet flavors of my others. Just a bit mild for me.

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 4:53PM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

For me, this is not that easy of a question. Reason being that on a given day, a particular perfectly tree ripened mango may beat all others in flavor and in the enjoyment it gives despite it not being in the top group that I am going to mention. So, my ratings are based on consistancy and my memories of the best occassion for that particular mango ever (with the understanding that there can be variability in quality from year to year based on conditions.

In the very top group would be Maha Chanook, Dot, Edward and Cushman...in no particular order. These would consistantly rate 9.0 or higher on a 10 point scale. After these, there is a group that, while not always in the top group, can, on a given day rival those in the top group. These would include Julie, Carrie, Graham,Mallika, Cogshall, Pickering, Okrung, Nam Doc Mai, Spirit of 76, Ice Cream, Valencia Pride and Southern Blush. These would consistantly rate 8.0-9.5 on a 10 point scale.

I also have a seedling tree grown from a Mallika seed that has fruit that has flavor with the best of the best...but is knocked down because of abundant fiber.

I reserve the right to be reminded of any other mango out there that I have neglected to give appropriate credit to. So...sorry for the long and convoluted answer...but this is my best answer. And, of course....this is all IMHO.

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 7:14PM
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swrancher

In no order...these are five types I recall thinking to myself "this is the perfect Mango!"

1. Carrie
2. Julie
3. Fairchild
4 Valencia Pride
5. Bombay

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 8:32PM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

P.S. I'd also put Bailey's Marvel in the second tier of mangos flavorwise...but production is not up to the other's standards.

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 9:20PM
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squam256

1. Edward - still haven't found one better
2. Spirit of '76 - On 2nd thought, maybe I have...

3. Fairchild
4. Beverly
5. Kent

That list might change some next season though.

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 10:34PM
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andrew78(6)

Tammy,
Did you prune your Lancetilla as soon as you got it? I am curious to how long it took for it to produce growth. I may end up waiting till spring. I am worried about a lot of new growth all at once and not being able to get it to mature indoors. I spent way too much money on these(as you did also!) trees to lose them now.
Andrew

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 10:47PM
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tammysf(9b/10a or sz15/16)

Pug and JSvand, isn't it interesting how different peoples taste buds are.

Harry and squam, I have not heard much of spirit of 76. Can you describe and where did you get them.

I really, really want an edward now. Pine says they will have in spring.

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 11:26PM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

P.P.S......I think I missed two more. I would rank both Kent and Neelum up in that second tier of mangos.

Tammy.....I got mine from Zill High Performance Plants. They do much of the mango grafting for the nursery trade here is So. FL. I got it about 15 years ago when we were able to go to Zill (ordinarily whole sale only) as part of one pf the field trips in my Sub-Tropical Fruit Class I took. I believe it is a Haden seedling....has a super Haden flavor but doesn't have the fiber.....nice sized fruits (20-24 oz) and beautiful sunset coloration when mature. A great mango.

    Bookmark   December 9, 2009 at 11:41PM
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andrew78(6)

Harry,
Well, I did it. I chopped Lancetilla down to just under two feet. I hope I didn't kill it. I had too. I noticed a lot of leaves that were browning all along leave edges. I think this was from shipping. Julie didn't have so many leaves with this problem. The lower leaves on Lancetilla look healthier, and I see buds that may grow now. I will keep my fingers crossed and post what happens next.
Andrew

    Bookmark   December 10, 2009 at 1:26AM
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squam256

Tammy, I had first heard about Spirit of '76 in some old mango literature that described it as having outstanding flavor. It was a Haden/Zill cross by Lawrence Zill.

Was not available in any nurseries though and it was not propagated commercially.

Finally got to try it at the Fruit and Spice park in Homestead last summer and it was easily the best mango I tried that day.

Sent an email to Zill's High Performance Plants asking if they still sold it and they said they'll be selling it wholesale in 2010, so places that use Zill's like some Home Depots and retail nurseries in south Florida should be carrying it.

    Bookmark   December 10, 2009 at 3:56AM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

See...just as Squam says.......this mango tasting thing is very much a day by day thing. You could just catch a particular fruit at its peak of ripeness and flavor and think, MY God....that's the best mango I have ever had!" Then, the next week, that very same variety won't get to 5th place on a table of other excellent mangos. The point is, there are a large number of excellent flavored mangos. Your personal tastes will dictate some general preferences. However, if you like mangos (or love them) all of the excellent ones, on a given day, have the potential of blowing you away taste-wise.

Good example...one of my friends never had a mango. He tried it....got hooked and was craving mango in the off season. He was up in British Columbia over the early season this past year and he kept calling me to tell me how wonderful the mangos were there and how shocked he was (since it was Canada). When he described the mango, I knew that he was tasting Ataulfo (Champagne). He kept telling me how these were as good or better than what he had tasted of mine the previous year. I told him to pack some up when he was ready to come home and we'd do a taste test with some of my early mangos. Well.....suffice it to say, his mangos didn't even make 10th place on our tasting table.....him being the judge. But, again, it is still a personal matter of taste and even I had to admit that the Ataulfo (CHampagne) even though store bought.....was a very eatable and enjoyable mango.

    Bookmark   December 10, 2009 at 8:11AM
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tammysf(9b/10a or sz15/16)

Hi andrew

I missed your post. I pruned mine pretty soon after I got it. I think a week.

    Bookmark   December 10, 2009 at 11:09AM
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puglvr1(9b central FL)

Hi Tammy, you are SO right! Taste is very subjective and things that could affect taste such as water, sun, location...all I know is this Glenn was one of the best I've ever eaten! I can still remember how good it was,lol...

Andrew, although I've never pruned mango trees in the winter, I would suggest you give it as much warmth/light as possible. I'm sure it will do fine...but might be slow and take longer than if you would have it done it in spring or summer to getting new growths. Good luck! Pictures below might give you some comfort.
Here' my severely "Pruned" Glenn after a "freeze" almost killed it...

Taken end of August...Please keep your fingers crossed for us...no severe freeze this year.

    Bookmark   December 10, 2009 at 11:35AM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

Puglvr1:
Glenn gets an excellent rating in most mango books. The bouquet is always superb. The flesh is fiberless and juicy. Here in So. FL., it tends to be a bit watery or flavor diluted I guess I would say. It can still be quite good but in my yard it doesn't crack the top tiers. Becasue of its meatiness, it is one of my favorite mangos to dehydrate.

Thanks for the picture of your pruning. I am not able to do the kind of pruning that you guys do. I just don't have the heart or the patience. But, I have experienced severe break down of limbs from too much fruit in my Bombay tree where the 15 foot tree broke all limbs down to the trunk and others, like Duncan, where Hurricane Wilma took it down to a stump. Those trees have scome back beautifully. So...mangos are very, very forgiving when it comes to heavy pruning.

    Bookmark   December 10, 2009 at 12:36PM
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jsvand5

"Here in So. FL., it tends to be a bit watery or flavor diluted I guess I would say. It can still be quite good but in my yard it doesn't crack the top tiers."

That is exactly what I noticed with mine. I am wondering if less rain during ripening may have helped make the flavor a bit stronger? Just compared to the julies I was eating the punch of flavor was not quite there. Still VERY good though compared to the crap that they sell in the supermarkets (aside from Ataulfo's and the Marathons when they are in season).

Harry, do you know if the marathons are actually Kents, or Keitts? I have heard they were one of those but never got confirmation. Here is one I had last season.

    Bookmark   December 10, 2009 at 12:54PM
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andrew78(6)

Dear Pug,
I wanted to tell you that somebody here told me to actually look at your pruning posts when I was concerned about chopping my lancetilla. I left a good 22 inches for bud growth. I know you guys get the weather channel and right now we are being hit by a major winter storm. So far my area has not been hit hard. I get very concerned with my lilac trees and roses. Last year I lost a lot of growth on roses due to snow piling up on top. Just to give you an idea of how cold it is, the twmp right now is 20 degrees. My bedroom( I call it my Florida room..LOL!) is the warmest in the apartment and that is where my mangoes and most tropicals spend there winter. I bet it is in the mid 70's all winter. I think if my citrus, caimito, and all the rest can grow and be happy, so can the mango but keep your fingers crossed. I will be really upset if any of my mangoes die. The lancetilla is the only one that looks sad but I just pruned it yesterday. Pug I wil keep my fingers crossed that there are no freezes in FL this year. It is actually a lot more important for us then I think you realize. I rermember either last winter or the winter before that, FL had a hard freeze. I went to my favorite grocery store for produce and almost had a heart attack. The produce prices were sky high! Well on anything from Florida they were!! So it is a huge concern for everyone in the northern half because we get our fresh produce from FL. in the winter, and from California. Right now my favorite orqanges are in season and I am not trying to offend any of my Florida friends but personally I like California navels better then any Florida orange. I never tried the honeybell and from what I hear they are superb. Even when they are in season in Fl. they are still not cheap. I also love the Moro blood orange which comes from California too. I will say that I also like the Florida ruby red grapefruit...okay enough with the citrus talk in a mango forum! I guess what I am saying is Fl and California produce is what we have access to in winter and I love fresh produce in winter, so no freezes for you guys!
Harry:
I can see why it would be hard to prune your fruit trees. I was almost doing a coin toss when I whacked down the lancetilla but I figured that it would be better for the tree to focus its energy on a smaller amount then on the whole tree. I remember a pic you posted of an avocado tree. I showed a buddy of mine and he couldn't believe it. He said that he had seen them like tht in P.R. I was thinking that that branch would end up snapping from the weight. I would think that wold be reason enough to prune, even if you didn't want to. I can't wait to see your trees this summer. Maybe I can take a few lessons from the master!
Andrew

    Bookmark   December 10, 2009 at 1:00PM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

jsvand5:
Less water would probably help Glenn's flavor here. Unfortunately, when the fruits mature....we have the rainy season. So that is easier said than done

Re: Marathon mango.....I have never heard of it or seen it. It is defintiely not Kent or Keitt. If anything, it looks most like Jakarta. Have any shots of one cut open that shows flesh color, texture, and seed size? Did it have the resinous twang a la Julie?

Andrew:
Hope your plants do OK in the cold. Meanwhile, we are having record heat here in Florida. It is suppposed to be close to 90 today. The mangos don't seem to mind it. However, I am very concerned how this warmth will affect the lychee and longan bloom.

    Bookmark   December 10, 2009 at 1:16PM
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jsvand5

It did have a strong flavor, but didn't have the coconut taste like the julie. Had a little fiber, but nothing like normal supermarket types. I did not take any pics of the interior. It has a large seed that was more round than most mangoes I have seen. The color a a nice orange. I'll see if I can find a pic online.

    Bookmark   December 10, 2009 at 3:29PM
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andrew78(6)

Harry,
Can you PLEASE send me some of your heat to western NY? Oh by the way I found this quite interesting. I know this is not the forum for this but I like to force several flower bulb during the winter so I can have flowers during the cold bleak winter. It helps with chasing away the winter blues. I 100% believe I suffer from seasonal depression. Anyhow, back to what I was saying. I force paperwhites occasionally around christmas (not every year). I had watched Martha Stewart one day because the owner of Logees was on discussing growing tropical fruits indoors. After they were done, they took questions from the audience. One guy had asked what to do with paperwhites when they were done blooming. I had always thrown them away because I always believed them to be to tender to grow here even though I am in a microclimate zone 7. Byron and Martha both agreed that trying to force them again would not work but said that you could plant them out in the spring. I did this and thought that they would never amount to anything. A few weeks ago I was looking at my flower bed deciding what to prune before the heavy snows came. I noticed that there were sprouts coming up and sure enough they are the paperwhite narcissus! I couldn't believe it!! I can only say that maybe being so close to the house, they get extra warmth that protects them. I just hope they stop growing. I know if they don't the flowers will never fully develop, but what an ego booster!! Has anyone in a northern climate had success with this??
Andrew

    Bookmark   December 10, 2009 at 3:32PM
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squam256

I had the same experience with Glenn this year. Bought a case of them from a grower in the Redland.

Still thought it was a very good mango though even though the flavor doesn't compare to some of the top tier varieties. I'll probably buy more next season since they are on the cheaper side.

Also, Glenn is supposed to be an extremely productive and consistent tree and the disease resistance is reportedly good as well.

    Bookmark   December 10, 2009 at 8:37PM
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sour_diesel(10b Hollywood, FL)

hard to say because they vary so much.

my favorite Thai variety is Nam Doc Mai, if i had to have one tree, that would be it.

my favorite Carribean variety would be Julie and my favorite Florida cultivar would be Carrie.

ive never tried an Indian mango yet.

here is a list of the varieties i tasted last year at Spykes (first mango season in Florida) and what i remember from them

Phillipine (WOW, i never knew about Thai mangos, now my favorite type)

Edward (looked like an average florida mango but tasted like a less pronounced Thai mango)

Glenn (better flavor than average, although one of the first mangos of the season i tasted was a very small Glenn that got alot of sun color, the flavor was incredible, i have a feeling it didnt get alot of rain)

Tommy Atkins (blah)

Valencia Pride (huge, but unremarkable although everyone else LOVED them)

Carrie (my favorite non Thai mango)

Southern Blush (pretty, but unremarkable)

Ice Cream (the one i tried was hard but ripe when i cut it and the flavor was different, nice texture of flesh though, not watery. i have to try another one to accurately assess it.)

Champagne (superb Thai taste, the only mango i will buy from the markets)

Madame Francis (fibrous but has a creamy texture like Carry, sweet, but fibrous)

heres a list of the trees i am currently growing:
nam doc mai
po pyu kalay
chou anon
okrung tong
Tong Dam
Alphonso
Alampur Baneshan
Zebda
Julie
Rosiegold
Carrie; which may become a turpentine, my dog chewed it down to a few inches above the graft if it becomes a turpentine i will let it grow for seeds for rootstock

    Bookmark   December 11, 2009 at 8:55AM
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andrew78(6)

Is it ever possible to buy a grafed champagne mango?? I would bewilling to pay over $100.00 if I had to. Seems like the price would be worth it since they are impossible for me to find and I love this fruit. I have only had the supermarket ones. I can only imagine what a homegrown fresh one would taste like! If anyone knows how or where I can find one Please let me know!
Andrew

    Bookmark   December 11, 2009 at 11:28AM
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sour_diesel(10b Hollywood, FL)

yes its possible.

i love Champagne mangos too, the reason they are so suberb is that they are grown in Mexico, where it is dry and the fruit do not become watered down. Florida is supposedly not suitable for mangos because of this reason, but obviously they flourish here.

Champagne is a commercial name of an Ataulfo mango. they may also be called Manilla mangos.

they are an Asian variety so the seed should be polyembryonic (many sprouts, the surviving one usually being true to type)

    Bookmark   December 11, 2009 at 3:42PM
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jsvand5

The ataulfo is supposedly slightly different than a normal manilla. I searched for about a year for an ataulfo but they don't seem to be grown in fl. I ended up getting a philippine which is supposed to be the same or very similar to a manilla. The tree is growing incredibly well for me and it is actually one of the few of my mangoes that does not have any black mold problems.

    Bookmark   December 11, 2009 at 3:51PM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

I have a Philippine tree. The fruit is considerably different than the Ataulfo (champagne) that I have seen in the stores. My Philippine is from Zill High Performance and the fruits are similar in color, but are much more cylindrical. The Ataulfos I have seen are somewhat flat. This what the ones that I have seen look like.

In looking through the internet there doesn;t seem to be as much difference as I seem to recall. Check this out:

Or this:

I am going to have to pay closer attention to this when I have fruits next year. It could be that these are related seedlings with some variation. Yes, while these are poly-embrionic, there is always a sexually produced plantlet that will grow from each seed. It is not always easy to select out the clones from the sexual reproduction at the early stages of growth that this is done. I remember touring Zill's nursery many years ago. Gary Zill was showing us how they used turpentine mango seedlings for their root stock. He showed us how mulitple sprouts coming out from each seed grown were plucked out leaving, what they thought was, the most vigorous growing clone. He was asked how he selected the cloned sprout and he said it was by sight. But, the only way to tell for sure is with chromomsomal examination. He confessed to probably only getting it right about 80% of the time. But that was good enough as the use of the turpentine root stock wasn;t essential to success. it was just a known quantity that did not have any incompatibilities. So, maybe that is what has occurred with the Ataulfo over the years and different growing areas in Mexico might be growing clones through grafting of different, but very similar Philippine or Manila mangos.

    Bookmark   December 11, 2009 at 11:28PM
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sour_diesel(10b Hollywood, FL)

click the link below,

Here is a link that might be useful: this guy gives great analysis on Mangos

    Bookmark   December 11, 2009 at 11:43PM
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andrew78(6)

Hey Harry,
I appreciated that information. Maybe I will get a Phillippine this summer. I really wanted the Champagne but I don't think I will ever find a grafted tree. I would love to have the experience you had. I think that is very interesting. I have taken botany classes and several landscaping classes. I enjoyed it very much bu decided to drop landscaping because I didn't want to have to resort to snow removal during the winter. The botany class was very educational, and the hands on research in the greenhouses was very intense but at the same time invaluable. I learned a lot about cloning and germplasm. If I had lived in the southern half of the U.S. I would have perued my landscaping degree or nursery managment. The tropical fruit classes would have come in handy for me now! I would like to find some good educational books on cultivation of tropical fruits. I would also like to try growing orchids from flasks. Right now I am looking at 1000 watt metal HID light setups. I know my mangoes will require more light and heating. Can you recommend any texts that I could purchase online to further my knowledge on tropical fruit culture? I realize that I am growing in pots but u8nderstanding thee needs will make it easier for me to evaluate what is/is not realistic for me to attempt to grow here. It kills methat Logees is trying to sell Cacao knowing that they need an abundance of heat/sun in order to grow and produce. For you I know that when they are small they need a certain amount of shade to prevent scorching of leaves but our light intensity is lower. Now do you see why I would like a good textbook? I know Logees is trying to make a buck but I feel for the amateur growers who think they can grow this because Logee's has made it sound like it is atainable. thanks Harry.
Andrew

    Bookmark   December 12, 2009 at 12:09AM
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swrancher

Andrew -

I keep seeing Ataulfo/Champagne Mango tree's listed on ebay, don't know if they are worth it or the real deal though.

Tony

    Bookmark   December 12, 2009 at 5:39PM
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sour_diesel(10b Hollywood, FL)

i bet Ataulfo would do really well in the Southern San Diego area.

    Bookmark   December 12, 2009 at 6:22PM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

Andrew:
The only book I have is the Julia Morton, "Fruit of Warm Climates". It is online now, so you needn't buy it. I have some Florida Gardening books that I don't think would be particularly helpful for you as the information is geared towards our conditions. I have gained all of my knowledge through either the Sub-Tropical Fruit Course at Broward Community College (which I took three successive years), the Rare Fruit Clubs (Miami and Broward), and just growing fruits here in Florida since I was a kid....and that was almost a half century ago.

Here is a link that might be useful: Julia Morton...Fruit of Warm Climates

    Bookmark   December 12, 2009 at 6:39PM
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sour_diesel(10b Hollywood, FL)

Carabao is another variety i believe is very similar to Ataulfo

    Bookmark   December 12, 2009 at 10:35PM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

Yes, Carabao is supposed to be. I bought a case of them a few years ago at one of the Fairchild festivals. Excellent! Planted the seeds from some and eventually planted out the most vigorous grower of the seedlings. The tree fruited....like barely....the fruit was nothing like its parent. Different in shape and every other way. When Hurricane Wilma knocked the tree down and I couldn't get it to prop back up, I swore I was going to chain saw it out of the yard. But, it still is growing 4 years later and still blooming but not setting very many fruits. This year I will apply more copper and if it still does not produce it is the end for this tree.

    Bookmark   December 12, 2009 at 11:08PM
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andrew78(6)

Swrancher the Autolfo you see on ebay are seedlings and for me they are too risky. First of all I don't know if I would end up with quality fruit, it might end up being something else. I also want a grafted tree. I think the seedling would be more vigorous and I would have a battle on my hands trying to control the growth but thanks for telling me they are on ebay.
Andrew

    Bookmark   December 12, 2009 at 11:10PM
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andrew78(6)

Does Zills have a website? I have to say that you guys who live in Florida are sooo lucky. I would love to find some of these curator's choice mangoes but I have to rely on the nurseries that do mail order. I am going to make a call to my tropicals greenhouse in Erie PA and see if they can help me but I am not to optimistic. I would love to grow the Emerald mango. Funny how just the other day I cught myself saying "No morer mango until I can try the fruit." I have all ready considered that idea a wash. I am just going to have to go with what people have to say here and hope for the best!
Andrew

    Bookmark   December 13, 2009 at 2:18AM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

Sorry, Andrew....to my knowledge Zill High Performance Plants does not have a website. They are striclty wholesale in any case. The only way I got in there was with that class I took. The prof. of our class had the connection to Gary Zill.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2009 at 10:49PM
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sour_diesel(10b Hollywood, FL)

i go to a local nursery that has Zill fruit trees. i asked him for a list of the trees Zill has and he didnt know of one, he would just order common varieties.

i called Zill not to long ago to find out what varieties they carried and they said they carry 25 different varieties wholesale only and there was no way to access a list of said varieties.

somewhat confused by this i thanked the lady and didnt want to bother her about the specific varieties they carried.

im looking for a Maha Chanook, according to a local mango guru that is a superior variety

    Bookmark   December 14, 2009 at 11:07AM
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dghays(Z10A FL Brevard)

If you're buying a few trees, Excalibur will go get from Zill whatever you want from there, they've done it for me a few times.

My Philippine is really strange, it only does one growth flush per year, it's small, but looks healthy enough. Someone else I know says the same thing about theirs.

Gary

    Bookmark   December 14, 2009 at 12:34PM
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sour_diesel(10b Hollywood, FL)

Excalibur has many varieties listed, im pretty sure all of Zills varieties are listed on their site.

anyone familiar with Excalibur mango?

anyone try Val Carrie? i love Carrie but refuse to plant two trees of the same variety.

Here is a link that might be useful: Excalibur plant list .PDF

    Bookmark   December 14, 2009 at 1:28PM
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dghays(Z10A FL Brevard)

I don't think so, Pim Saen Mun is one off the top of my head that I believe Zill supplied to Exc for me, perhaps Okrong Tong also if memory serves.

    Bookmark   December 14, 2009 at 5:19PM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

Sour diesel:
I don't have and neither have I tasted a Val Carrie. I forget, but I think it is supposed to be a cross of Valencia Pride and Carrie and it is a mid-season mango. I once saw a huge potted tree at a nursery along Griffin Road. They wanted a pretty good bit of money for it. I forget who I spoke to about it, but the review they gave was not that great. Something to the effect of "BUy carrie or buy Valencia Pride....but don't bother with Val Carrie." So I never bought it.

Re: Excalibur mango......I bought one. Acording to Wilson, the main knowledgeable assistant at Excalibur it is a very large and excellent mango with no fiber. That was good enough for me.

    Bookmark   December 14, 2009 at 5:49PM
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j-grow

i have a val-carrie but it has not fruited yet. when i went to zill over a year ago to get some other things i happened to ask the guy helping me what his favorite mango was and he told me val-carrie so i picked one up. it is planted in a bad spot of my yard with to much shade though and i may have to part with it

    Bookmark   December 16, 2009 at 3:43AM
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sour_diesel(10b Hollywood, FL)

i love Carrie, but im afraid that a hybrid with valencia pride may water down the creamy texture.

i want to try a DOT mango, thats a seedling of Carrie.

also i want to try Graham and see if it tastes like a Julie.

I think ice cream is supposed to come from the same cultivation program as Julie or maybe the same seedling strain, i tried one but i think it was under ripe.

those are my goals this mango season, lol.

Harry, do you have a picture of a Maha Chinook mango or what it resembles? the only place i have ever seen one is on the Broward RFVC list.

    Bookmark   December 16, 2009 at 9:10AM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

Sour diesel:
I have no personal pictures of it. From the internet you will find it spelled maha chanok. It supposedly means "King's Mango" or something like that in Thai. BRFVC got the bud wood for this tree from me and they now have one growing at their 208 nursery. It was sent to me from Thailand many years ago. Here are some internet shots.

    Bookmark   December 16, 2009 at 9:39AM
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kennyn

Has anyone tried a florigon mango?

    Bookmark   January 21, 2010 at 8:02PM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

Florigon is a "Saigon" type mango. Mostly green with a yellowish cast when mature at my house. Flesh is fiberless and orange with a very nice sweet flavor. It doesn't have a lot of complexity as compared to "Indian" cultivars. It fruits very regularly and quite heavily. At my house the season ranges from May through possibly as late as July.....depending on the season. It is pretty anthracnose resistant and is a pretty vigorous grower. Defintely not a dwarf or condo mango.

    Bookmark   January 21, 2010 at 10:47PM
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squam256

I tried Florigon last year and thought it was pretty good.

    Bookmark   January 21, 2010 at 11:22PM
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tropicalgrower89(10b)

My haden has always been giving great mangoes. But, now I also have a grafted glenn, which I bought from Lowes a couple of months back. Haven't eaten any glenn mangoes, but so far I've heard it's better than haden, so I'm looking forward to eating one. The haden and the glenn are now producing green knobs. Could be flowers or new branches. Honestly, I have never eaten any other type of mango. There's a type of mango that my mom remembers from when she was a little girl in Cuba, that was small and yellowish/orange and was very fiberous. The way you would eat it is by squeezing it and biting a piece of skin off and sucking the juice out of it. The juice of that mango was extremely sweet and delicious. What type can that be?

    Bookmark   January 22, 2010 at 12:51AM
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squam256

tropicalgrower, the small, yellow, and fibrous description sounds like Turpentine, which is mostly used as a rootstock now. There are a couple different types of Turpentine and they are labeled by number (ie, Turpentine 10, etc)

You might be interested to know that Turpentine was one of the parents of Haden (along with Mulgoba)

    Bookmark   January 22, 2010 at 2:11PM
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tropicalgrower89(10b)

Cool. Thanks!^

    Bookmark   January 22, 2010 at 2:15PM
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kennyn

Well I had a Florigon mango tree, never got a single mango out of it, I think its dead now from the great freeze of 10'. Anyways, my wife is letting me buy 1 mango tree to replace it. What should I get???? I want the perfect tree (if there is such a thing) I want a highly productive, and very good tasting tree, (mango appearance and color dont matter when im eating the deliciousness). Sooo, I have to do this right. I looked at the trees at PIN website and they list like 15 trees as both excellent taste and excellent flavor so I thought I would turn to you guys. I was thinking:
nam doc mai
kent
glenn
millika
those seem to match my criteria according to PIN's website.
Also, 1 last thing, I dont know what kind are in grocery stores (ive heard that they are either VP or keitt) I dont want a tree that will produce fruit I could just go buy.
Please help me!!! I have to get the perfect tree becasue I can only have 1! Thanks.

    Bookmark   February 27, 2010 at 4:49PM
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j-grow

the age old question! you cant go wrong with Glenn or Carrie

    Bookmark   February 27, 2010 at 5:56PM
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jsvand5

Only one of the ones on your list are one of my favorites, but maybe you should wait until summer so you can try a bunch of different types. That way you can see what you like the best. My favorites so far are Carrie, Nam doc mai, but there are tons that I haven't tried. I recently bought and Edward, and a Pickering which are supposed to be excellent. I am hoping to try the "Tebow" this season. Sounds like it should be a great one. Good luck on whatever you choose. Personally, I would buy three and hide two from your wife for a while.

    Bookmark   February 27, 2010 at 7:10PM
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squam256

Kenn, from those 4 you listed I would pick Glenn based on your criteria (trying to maximize production and flavor).

Have you given any thought to Fairchild at all? That is also a very productive variety that tastes excellent (and has a pretty small growth habit too). Its also got good anthracnose resistance, unlike Kent, which may taste just as good.

    Bookmark   February 27, 2010 at 8:26PM
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mango_kush

i think he might be better in the long run with a larger tree, get it growing big and it will be able to take our next freeze (hopefully in 10 > years!)

as long as the tree survives above the graft it will always grow back.

i would go with a Kent or Tebow, which would get larger then a Glenn. Glenn will get probably 20 feet full size.

    Bookmark   February 27, 2010 at 8:59PM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

Kennyn:

All four you list are excellent and you would not be going wrong with any of them. Do you have any preference for the season of the mango that you are going to choose? That could further help you decide. Also, have you thought about planting more than one tree in the same hole, so you can have more than one variety to choose from. Or, you could graft onto whatever tree you decide to buy to allow for the addtional varieties. Unless you taste these manoges personally, it is really very tough for us or anyone to definitively tell you which is the "best one" for your particular tastes and preferences.

Harry

    Bookmark   February 27, 2010 at 10:34PM
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kennyn

I guess I was a little vague about "taste delicious". What I meant about that was just something widely considered one of the top varieties. Highly productive is a must. I guess to narrow it down a little I would like something that isnt so lanky like my florigion was (but maybe that was due to pruning). So hard to decide, so many options.

    Bookmark   February 28, 2010 at 1:14PM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

Of the four you mention, Kent and Glenn are the heaviest bearers at my house. Glenn is early season and tends to drop all of its fruit by the end of June. Kent is a late variety and seems to hold its fruit a bit longer.

    Bookmark   March 1, 2010 at 7:48AM
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kennyn

Of those 2 trees, which one looks better? Are they both about the same size? Which one taste better to you?

    Bookmark   March 1, 2010 at 9:09AM
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stanofh

For the bay area-Manila is best. Im not sure if ANY other type has born normal sweet fruit here. My Manila had in 2006. 2007 just about killed it. A second Manila was doing so well-excellent. I made the mistake to plant it in a spot that turned too damp in winter..and it caught anthracnose.
Manila is worth another try.
Right now,in the name of trying something else,I have a Bailey. I hear good things on its hardiness,not so good on fruiting in California. Oh well,I have it. Might as well see how it does even if it just makes a nice potted dwarf tree. It did well this year-but I did put in the garage for two nights in December. The rest of the winter unprotected and in full sun.

    Bookmark   March 1, 2010 at 11:44AM
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kennyn

Ok, I did it today. Bought a Glenn. It is in a 7 gallon pot and it is about 6 feet tall. It is only a trunk and leaves, not a single branch. I obviously want it to branch out, more branches more mangos right? Anyways, on the top it has a good size nub, should I just chop the nub off or should I get a little more agressive and chop it to about 4-5 feet tall? Orrrrrrr should I just leave it be. Thanks for the help guys.

    Bookmark   March 3, 2010 at 3:46PM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

Kennyn:

You might want to check out this thread. I didn't chop it yet. Mine had some fruit set until this latest round of cold winds. I'm debating on what I am going to do with it. If you are growing in a pot, you probably should chop it.

Harry

Here is a link that might be useful: To prune or not to prune

    Bookmark   March 3, 2010 at 7:11PM
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kennyn

Harry, I saw that forum earlier today when I was searching for purning. My tree looks just like that one but mine is about 2 feet taller. I am going to leave it in the pot for about another week (the weather says its going to finallllllllly heat up night time temps in the mid to high 60s) I'm thinking about cutting the top 2 feet of it off tonight and leaving it in my house in the heat to recover for a week or so then planting it when my other tree was. What do you think?

    Bookmark   March 3, 2010 at 7:22PM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

Kennyn:

Chopping won't be a problem and the people supposedly in the know say that pruning is a must. I am not from the heavy pruning school. Not because I don't think it can be effective, but rather because I am very much into instant gratification and I am exceedingly short on patience. I therefore haven't the heart to chop all that new growth off. But I am willing to admit that my method may not be the best method, but with my mangoes, it hasn't seemed to matter too much while the tree were young. Once they got some size, taking out the central leader is important if you don't want a monster sized tree. In any case, if you chop, I don't think it will be necessary to bring the plant inside. It'll do fine outside. The more light, the better. Good luck, and may your decision work out for you and your new tree!

Harry

    Bookmark   March 3, 2010 at 8:31PM
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kennyn

I just cut the top 3 notches off (about 2-2.5 feet) My tree is now 5 notches high (about 4.5 feet). When will I see some growth? Will it be pretty instant? Should I take it down another notch? (haha, take it down another notch) Some articles I read says cut it at the second notch, but I think they might be referring to smaller trees. I couldnt imagine cutting a 6 foot tall tree to a foot and a half. I think 4.5 feet is pretty good. Opinions?

    Bookmark   March 3, 2010 at 9:10PM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

I think your fine.....leave it be, I think you'll be happy with the results. As far as timing for seeing growth, there are many factors that might affect the speed at which the new buds push. Generally, the warmer and more humid the weather, the faster the new growth pushes. It won't be long under any circumstances....unless you're like me....in which case I would remind you of the old adage....."a watched tree never pushes new growth." Sure seems like that sometimes anyway.

Harry

    Bookmark   March 3, 2010 at 10:49PM
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puglvr1(9b central FL)

I agree with Harry...you should be fine. Weather def. has a big role in the growth speed. Mine takes anywhere from 3-6 weeks when the weather is nice and hot/humid. Keep it in a warm place tonight. We're suppose to have another chance of frost tomorrow morning :o( at least in my area. Since you live in St.Pete you probably won't get any...but better safe than sorry.

    Bookmark   March 4, 2010 at 10:35AM
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kennyn

I plan on keeping it in the house all day and all night in a sunny window until monday. Weather.com says starting Monday we will have highs in the 70s and lows in the 60s so I think thats a good time for it to be planted.

    Bookmark   March 4, 2010 at 1:40PM
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kennyn

Do mango trees get root bound? Is this something to worry about, or are mangos pretty good about being in small pots then being planted. Just curious.

    Bookmark   March 4, 2010 at 6:49PM
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mango_kush

mangos can definitely get root bound, which is why Fairchild only sells small trees.

they have a taproot that can be irreversibly spiraled

    Bookmark   March 4, 2010 at 8:00PM
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kennyn

I bought a 7 gallon glenn the other day, it was about 6-7 feet tall so its probably been in a pot for at least 3 years I would think (probably started in a 1-3 gallon, who knows when they moved it to the 7) I havent taken it out of the pot yet, how will I know if its root bound? If it is root bound what are the side effects?

    Bookmark   March 5, 2010 at 10:12AM
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mango_kush

generally the taproot, the large root the tree is directly connected to, should be facing downward. you want to dig a hole and loosen the dirt beneath the tree so this taproot can hit the water table.

a rootbound taproot will look spiraled, which is great for a bonsai tree, but not one that going in the ground. if the root doesnt go down deep enough the tree will never be established and it has a greater risk of getting blown over

    Bookmark   March 5, 2010 at 5:16PM
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bulldawger

Top 5:
Edwards - indescribable sweet, melting factor that makes it special
Julie - unique hint of pineapple
Nom Doc - sweet lemony flavor, silky texture
Carrie - juiciest of all, rich, sweet flavor
Mallika-honey like(if properly ripened; if not it has turpentine flavor)

I had a few glenn last year that also had a very watered down flavor, not impressed. But will give it another shot considering I have one in the yard.

Cuban ones that you squeeze the juice out may be Prieto or Toledo

    Bookmark   May 10, 2010 at 5:31PM
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tropicdude

Wow, top 5? as mentioned by others, the same variety may taste different depending on season, and location where it was grown.

oddly I have not tried many "American" varieties of mangoes.

I have tried, Keitt, Tommy, Haden, and Palmer. out of those 4, the Palmer was the best. but the Keitts from my mothers yard are very good, actually they are the best Keitts I have eaten. which has me wondering is thats what they really are.

Ok, here in the Caribbean we have dozens of varieties, and although I sampled a lot of them, I can say I did it when they were at proper ripeness, one mango that stands out in memory was the "Pascual" a very big mango, which was almost like a citrus.

personally I do not care for a mango that is all sweet but little flavor.

Growing at the moment, Lancetilla, plan on getting soon, Alphonso, and Nam Doc Mai. those varieties are not common here, this is why I want to grow them. dozens of others are available everywhere here.

    Bookmark   May 11, 2010 at 6:48PM
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mangojoe_1975(Guatemala)

1. Nam Doc Mai
2. Mallika
3. Haden
4. Choconon
5. Carrie

    Bookmark   May 16, 2010 at 12:30PM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

mango joe:

Thanks for posting your fave top five mangoes. I try to size up people's taste for mangoes based upon what they tell me they have tried and like. Your top 5 I find a bit puzzling. I get the NDM, Mallika and Carrie. But, how did Haden and Chocanon slip in there? What do you find about the eating exeprience of these that causes you to put them into your top five?

Harry

    Bookmark   May 17, 2010 at 1:35PM
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tammysf(9b/10a or sz15/16)

puglvr,

my glenn looked just like yours... :) i also thought it was delicious.

i REALLY do not have room for anymore mango trees but i am just so tempted to get another and this thread makes it so much harder for me to resist mango fever again!

    Bookmark   November 22, 2010 at 2:33PM
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jfernandez(10B)

1.Bizcochuelo
2.Manila/Manilita( Mexico Yucatan)
3.Madame Francis
4.Haden
5.Mallika

    Bookmark   November 22, 2010 at 7:39PM
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mango_kush

never heard of Bizcochuelo, had to google it:

A Taste of Old Cuba: Bizcochuelo Style

The mango: no other fruit has the historic association, or is so inextricably connected with the folklore of the great people of Cuba. Since the early 1700s when the mango arrived in Cuba from Jamaica, it has been one of the nation's favorite fruits. With so many tropical fruits and abundant sugar in Cuba, you can only imagine the wonder of the 'Bizcochuelo' mango of Santiago de Cuba, a succulent fruit that you can squeeze and enjoy fresh or as a milk-shake. There are several other races of Cuban mangos. The 'Filipino' was traditional in Cuba and later was popular in Mexico, and eventualy Florida. It is a delicious mango loved to this day throughout the region. The 'Mango Chino' of the Quinta Aviles at Cienfuegos, 'Manga Mamey' well known in Havana, or the 'Manga Amarilla' and 'Manga Blanca' (the yellow and white mango, respectively) are just a few of the wondrous mangos found on the island.

Not only is Cuba blessed with the mango, nature's candy, but its culinary dishes are filled with wonderful flavors.

Here is a link that might be useful: http://www.virtualherbarium.org/tropicalfruit/mangorecipes.html

    Bookmark   November 23, 2010 at 4:05PM
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jfernandez(10B)

I first try this legendary mango in 2005 in Havana and again in Barcelona Spain in 2006. It lived up to its billing......sweet as honey, fiberless creamy, juicy - the perfect balance. I was wondering if Harry or any of the mango experts have a seedling growing in Florida. Evidently, it's a regional mango from Santiago de Cuba and unique to that climate, ultimately it falls short it you try to grow it anywhere else in the island.

    Bookmark   November 23, 2010 at 8:23PM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

@jfernandez:

I don't have a Bizcochuelo mango. At least, not called by that name. I would like to see pictures of the fruit....many mangoes have local names that vary from country to country even though they are actually the same cultivar. I had never even heard of it before this thread. I do have a friend that is Cuban and who is also a rare fruiter with may more years of growing than I have had. I am going to check with him to see what he knows of it.

Harry

    Bookmark   November 23, 2010 at 9:14PM
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stanofh

Well,another vote for Baileys-mainly because it has real cold hardiness.Lets face it-taste doesnt matter if the tree's are dead every 3 or 4 years. Of,course what good is a Mango that wont fruit..but lets not think negative-lol.
btw,Despite being tip pruned- it just kept that narrow vertical growth.So narrow I have it under the eaves of my old garage. At 6'+ 1' of plastic nursery pot it just about fits perfect.

    Bookmark   November 24, 2010 at 3:25PM
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jfernandez(10B)

Thanks Harry,

For those who live in the Iberian peninsula or plan on visiting Spain in June, I bought my bizcochulos in "El Corte Inles". They specialize in fruits and products from Cuba.

Joe

    Bookmark   November 24, 2010 at 10:58PM
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adiel

How about the "Angie" cultivar? No one has mentioned it so far.

Adiel

    Bookmark   January 3, 2011 at 4:06PM
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mango_kush

Angie is a new cultivar here and last year because of our crazy extreme weather patterns mango season was pretty much a wash.

Jean Ellen I was told was poor by two different people last year but again this was during an abnormal season

    Bookmark   January 6, 2011 at 11:37AM
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esco_socal

Joe
How did you go about importing tree(s) coming back from outside the country?

thanks

Tim

    Bookmark   January 6, 2011 at 3:06PM
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jfernandez(10B)

Tim -

Oh no, I was refering to the fruit.....I wish I had a bizcochulo tree but maybe you could find one in a Canary Island nursery. Perhaps Felipe (pikorazi) could find out if they sell that variety in Gran Canaria, he is from Tenerife.

    Bookmark   January 7, 2011 at 11:14PM
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adiel

I also heard the Jean Ellen was not as good as the Rosigold for "super" early season mango. I went with a Rosigold. I will post pictures in the future. Has anyone tasted the "Angie" cultivar?

Adiel

    Bookmark   January 8, 2011 at 8:51AM
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adiel

Here is a picture of the Rosigold tree. Notice the two rocks hanging to the side branches to promote horizontal growth. These new branches developed when I top pruned it a while back:

Adiel

    Bookmark   January 8, 2011 at 10:24AM
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dannyduprey(z10 FL)

My Rosigold is still young. The first fruit I got from it (February 2009) didn't have much flavor. In 2010 the winter fruiting was light, and I didn't get a taste. But last July the fruit was very good. I don't know if a summer fruiting tends to have a richer flavor than a winter one. Maybe the increasing maturity of the tree makes the difference? There are a few fruit on it now that I may get to try in a couple weeks, if the pests (animal and human) don't get it first.

    Bookmark   April 2, 2011 at 10:19PM
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sleep(10a/b)

Like many of the others have stated, it is hard to make a list. But, as of now, and from memory, I would say my top 3 are:

1. Hindi Bessenara
2. Val-Carrie ( tree tagged Valkyrie at the Fruit and Spice park
3. Julie

My Wife would say:
1. Glenn
2. Mulgoba
3. Haden

Daughter: ( 5 yrs old)
1. Glenn
2. Kent
3. Mulgoba

You can see how much personal taste plays a part in the evaluation. Also like others have said, growing conditions, etc . Play a big role.

I have had some exceptional Glenn's from my tree, but as others said, it seems to taste better when rainfall is sparse. My Hadens also vary quite a bit. It seems the longer they remain on the tree, the better they taste.

I do not care much for Valencia Pride, and when that tree is full, I end up giving a lot of them away.

I have, thus far, not been impressed with my Rosigold, Cogshall, or Alfonso. Maybe it is because they are young trees and they were unable to produce quality fruit being so young.

I also have quite a few other varieties growing, my young trees are maturing, and the trying of new varieties will expand my taste base. This list may very well change as time goes on :)

    Bookmark   April 3, 2011 at 1:45PM
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squam256

Sleep, I'll gladly take those Valencia Prides off your hands. :)

    Bookmark   April 3, 2011 at 10:29PM
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MangoDoc

Harry, Can you tell me where I could get a Maha Chanook tree from, Thanks Joe.

jsvand5, From what I can see from your photos, and from your description of the flavor It sounds like a Jakarta.
Hope this helped.

Here's the link to Zills. Say Hi to Lisa for me!!
zillhpplants@hotmail.com

    Bookmark   April 4, 2011 at 10:18AM
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hmhausman(FL 10B)

Maha Chanooks are importable from Thailand. See recent post from OhioJay:

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/tropicalfruits/msg0314142720771.html?24

Frankie's in Hawaii has had them also, but may not presently.

I keep threatening to graft some to make my fortune. However time and very poor grafting success has limited my accomplishing what I intended.

Harry

    Bookmark   April 4, 2011 at 12:52PM
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MangoDoc

Harry, Would be glad to graft some for you if I can keep one for myself. Let me know, thanks Joe.

    Bookmark   April 4, 2011 at 1:57PM
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rockmaker(z9 AZ)

Of the ones I have fruited in AZ, my list would be:

1. Nam Doc Mai
2. Glenn
3. Okrung
4. Kiett
5. Valencia Pride

I had a Carrie that flowered every year but never set a single fruit in 10 years. Freeze of 2007 got it. Freeze of 2010/11 took out Glenn and Lancetilla. Supposedly 50 year freezes 4 years apart....

    Bookmark   April 6, 2011 at 4:57PM
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mangodog(palm springs 9B)

rockmaker - I assume you are near or in Phoenix. My manila seems unfazed by our scorching sun, did the Nam Doc Mai, Glenn, Kiett or Valencia Pride need any shading in the beginning?

I ask because I have some young plants of those varieties in the ground....

mangoAfghan

    Bookmark   April 6, 2011 at 9:53PM
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jofus(9b/10a Englewood, Fl)

Hi Tammy,
I have been so fortunate in stumbling upon the 4 greatest mango varieties to be grown here in South Florida. I started out in Islamorada in the Upper Keys when I finally retired for good in 2001. I had a smallish lot but had a 50' x 20' raised bed already installed using railroad ties. ( lots of coral in the Keys )
Not knowing a damn thing about mangos except that I loved the taste, I drove up to Ray's Nursery on Krome Ave in Homestead to start my search. A good choice, met Armando ( who was born in Cuba ) and told him my story. Only looking for one tree, my very first, he unhesitatingly recommended a Glenn. An instantaneous winner,..wow, was hooked when I drove back up 6 months later for my 2nd. Armando hesitated for only 3, 4 seconds before recommending a Kent.
The rest is history, his 2 great choices led me to a Nam Doc Mai next ( the only mango tree available today that has been undisturbed genetically from it's origins 4,000 years ago in Thailand & Burma ). Then I bought a Valencia Pride, ( huge tree, huge late ripening, colorful, tasty fruit ). Thats it, I stopped at four but along the way tried a Julie on a whim. Bad mistake, even in the Keys, where everything grows, I had problems with that guy. Dug it up and threw it out a year after planting it.
Am now in SW Florida and salivating on next spring & summers harvest,..content in the knowledge that I have four of the finest mango trees in the world ! Surely more than enough to keep this retired farmer busy,..but giving away about 1/3rd of my harvest has also made me many good friends ! LOL

    Bookmark   October 1, 2011 at 12:48PM
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charleslou23

i didnt see anyone mention pickering and cogshall, or maybe i just missed it, are these 2 varieties arent high on taste and sweetness?

    Bookmark   February 6, 2012 at 5:47PM
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tropicdude

@charleslou23

Its a long post, hmhausman wrote this:

" In the very top group would be Maha Chanook, Dot, Edward and Cushman...in no particular order. These would consistantly rate 9.0 or higher on a 10 point scale. After these, there is a group that, while not always in the top group, can, on a given day rival those in the top group. These would include Julie, Carrie, Graham,Mallika, Cogshall, Pickering, Okrung, Nam Doc Mai, Spirit of 76, Ice Cream, Valencia Pride and Southern Blush. These would consistantly rate 8.0-9.5 on a 10 point scale. "

I personally have not tried the pickering, but have seen many posts in which Pickering was suggested as a great condo / container mango.

So is it the best in the world?, maybe not, but it may be the best variety, if space is limited. and still probably 10 times better than anything found at a supermarket. I have not read anything bad about pickering.

    Bookmark   February 7, 2012 at 1:59AM
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manny8077

i have a lancetilla that dried up can it come back in the spring I cut it to 5 inch trucnk

    Bookmark   July 9, 2013 at 1:17AM
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puglvr1(9b central FL)

If the roots are still alive it will regrow new leaves...have you checked the roots or you can "lightly" scratch the trunk with your fingernail and if the tree is alive you will green if its dead it will be very hard and brown in color...Good luck!

    Bookmark   July 9, 2013 at 3:33PM
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Dexter_FTG

My top 5 (in no particular order):
Manilita
Pickering
Keitt
Nam Doc Mai
Ivory

Each mango is pretty much totally different than the next, but all are great in their own way!

    Bookmark   August 20, 2013 at 3:03AM
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stanofh

For the record- Baileys fruited less then two years later at 7' tall of skinny tree. The following winter- Jan '12, it was nearly killed by a single night of 32f frost...something it had taken in stride pre fruiting. So,it spent all last summer trying to grow from below the graft. It was covered to protect it from last Jan '13's real cold of 31f..and did fine. Only,the '12 frost had cut it down to about 2'...and right now is a fairly bushy 3'. Without a doubt about half as fast as the the Baileys graft had been in growth. Or less.
Its now Haden it appears. With the woody little trunk..its like a 3' Bonsai Mango. No need to get out any pruning utensils.

    Bookmark   August 20, 2013 at 10:07PM
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rockmaker(z9 AZ)

Well, the THIRD "50 year" freeze in the last 6 years last winter has me down to one mango tree, but it is just the rootstock of the Valencia Pride. I assume this is Turpentine as the tree came from Pine Island Nursery. Not coincidently, this one is planted next to the house. I guess I'll be grafting on to it next spring. Want to try Cushman and Ice Cream.

    Bookmark   October 29, 2013 at 8:34PM
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demeter_26

Hi Harry,
If you had ONLY two last spots in your yard to grow two mango trees and you had to choose two among the three... a Dot, a Cushman and an Edward, which two would you pick? Sorry Harry, I don't mean to paint you into the corner but your answer would be greatly appreciated.
I'm here in Hollywood, FL. > 3 miles from the beach.
Thank you :)

    Bookmark   October 30, 2013 at 5:28PM
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demeter_26

Harry,
I forgot to ask you > Are any of those 3 mango trees (I mentioned above) dwarfs or semi-dwarfs or are they all vigorous growers?
Thank you.
John

    Bookmark   November 1, 2013 at 3:15PM
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stanofh

I wonder what Tammy's tree's are like? I haven't seen a post from her in a long time. I wish I had book marked her blog.
And a young lady in San Jose had also planted a few Mangos...another that hasn't posted in a while.

    Bookmark   November 19, 2013 at 8:54PM
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safire33

Is there anyone that owns a Maha Shanook mango and a Pickering mango and would be willing to offer a seed of those trees for sale?
Thank you.

    Bookmark   December 8, 2013 at 2:57PM
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brandon1971

Maha chinook and Pickering will not come true to seed because they are not polyembryonic seed. The only common varietes that come true to seed are Philippine,nam doc, Fairchild, florigon, Kensington pride, turpentine, Jakarta and Madame Francis. Below is the list but it's split into 2 photos.

This post was edited by brandon1971 on Tue, Jul 15, 14 at 14:59

    Bookmark   July 15, 2014 at 2:46PM
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brandon1971

Top 1/2 of previous photo

    Bookmark   July 15, 2014 at 2:51PM
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jofus(9b/10a Englewood, Fl)

This old blog is stil going strong, and for good reason. 'Tis the season, so why not rehash our updated lists on the best mangoes we've ever tasted ?
I've been at this now for 15 years, first in the Upper Florida Keys, ( Islamorada..zone 11 ), and now for last 10 yrs in SW Florida,..zone 9b. Have tasted 90 % of what's available and IMHO the best tastting mangoes come down to only three ( 3 ), and as as far as I am concerned, will not denigrate any of them to the # 2 or # 3 position,..they are all # 1 in my book.
The Glenn, The Kent and The Vallencia Pride.
Just in last day have completely processed every fruit from my youngeist 4 yr old, 12 ft tall Glenn,..just fabulous mangoes,- had more than a few neighbors & friends drooling over the 40 + fruits.
The Kent was fruitless this season, but next yr will be different.
The Vallencia Pride, ( couldn't post a pic for some reason ), at 15 ft, is also only 4 yrs old, - has still not dropped a fruit as of today, - am salivating over the 50 + huge fruits that will start ripening at July's end.
Feel blessed at having selected these three, however have two babies just starting out at 5 ft tall,..a Maha Chanook and a Tebow. so maybe in another two years will be able to add one more to that list of fantabulous mangoes !!

    Bookmark   July 19, 2014 at 11:07AM
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greenman62

Jofus
i am in 9b and am thinking of buying a tree from Pine Island, or another nursery.
i read there is no difference in cold hardyness between varieties is this true ?
and that valencia pride was a good choice in case it got damaged in a freeze, it would grow back fast.
other names were Golden Nugget and alphonso
alphonso likes a lot of water, and we get a lot of rain here in New Orleans
i have a 3ft Florigon which is an early bearer

    Bookmark   July 20, 2014 at 2:45PM
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ChuckUrso1

Nice to see people close to me in! Hello to Jofus in Englewood, My top picks are

1. Dot- ( the new Zill releases IMHO will never match this fruits complexity)
2. Himsager ( most would have it in there top 3 if they ever tasted it. Similar to Dot in flavor, with a slight hint of coconut.
3. Edward- a truly superb mango mango
4. Orange Sherbet- this fruit when on, has a rare and truly great flavor.
5. Keitt (because it tastes so good and is so late when all others are done producing. Great on salads when your waiting on your heirloom tomato crops to come in).

I also have a 19 year old Carrie mango tree that I am using as the mother tree for a few of the new releases, I just accomplished grafting Pina Colada on to her, and will add Lemon Zest, Himsager, Peach Cobbler, and Dot very soon.

    Bookmark   July 20, 2014 at 6:54PM
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