baby worms climbing up on the wall of the bin

supersamOctober 5, 2008

I bought 1 lb of redworms about 4 months ago. I put them in the rubbermaid tote. My tote is deep (about 2 feet, but the bedding is only 1 foot deep), I drilled about 20 holes right above the bedding on all four sides and 10 holes at the bottom. They have started to reproduce which is very exciting. I've done some research myself and I know they are really the red worm babies (long with a little pink color). I recently noticed quite a few red worm babies each morning climbing up on the wall of the tote and under the lid. I noticed some dried up ones as well. I use shredded news paper, peat moss, dried pines and coir moss for bedding. I don't think I have too much water because not too much water came out at the bottom holes. I could have too much food, but not a lot. The adult worms seem to be happy where they are at, only babies try to climb up. I kept them in my yard under the fence with no sun. I think I'm doing everything right, so I'm not sure why the baby worms want to climb up.

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
flanna

I'm not sure why the babies but not the adults. I see you said dry pines? Do you mean pine needles? That is a no no if its the case.

Darren

    Bookmark   October 6, 2008 at 9:50PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lkittle(6)

Hi supersam; The reason the baby worms are going up the sides and onto the top is the condensation on them the water is full of O2 and the worms want it. The water is not enough for the bigger worms and then it dries up leaving behind the baby worms to dry out unless they sense the drying process and crawl back down.

    Bookmark   October 10, 2008 at 9:08AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
supersam

Hi lkittle,
Thanks for your response. Yes I think you're right on the condensation. But this is not the due to too much water in the bin right? Should I be doing something to improve the bin condition and prevent the babies from doing that? Do you think most of them do crawl down? It is hard for me to tell.

    Bookmark   October 10, 2008 at 1:00PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
supersam

Hi Darren,
What's wrong with dried pine needles in the worm bin?

    Bookmark   October 10, 2008 at 1:03PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lkittle(6)

Hi supersam; I think most of them probibly crawl back down. The warm air flowing thru the bin if the bin cools faster than the internal temp then condensation occurs. the air will draw moisture out of the bedding even.

Pine needles are toxic to worms as is all evergreen plants that have pitch in them.

    Bookmark   October 10, 2008 at 8:12PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mndtrp

If it makes you feel any better, I only have adults crawling around in my bin. I haven't seen any babies in quite a while, but I don't go digging around in my bin anymore.

    Bookmark   October 23, 2008 at 1:38AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
11otis

Hi lkittle,
what is "pitch" in the evergreen? I looked up in my dictionary but no explanation relevant to plants/gardening.
Thanks.
Otis

    Bookmark   January 5, 2009 at 4:18PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lkittle(6)

Himotis 11; pitch is pine tree sap. Its very sticky and when dry is crystle like. It contains chemicals that are toxic to worms. All evergreen trees have it.

    Bookmark   January 5, 2009 at 5:47PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
11otis

Hi lkittle,
OK, I've got it. Thanks for explaining.
Otis

    Bookmark   January 5, 2009 at 6:22PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Greens vs Browns
I've done standard compost for a while now and I just...
duaroger
Shredded Cardboard Question
I am a vermicompost novice with two bins right now...
bassopotamus
Houzz Rule(r)s
Today I received an official welcoming gift via the...
chuckiebtoo
Coffee grounds and pine shavings?
I've ordered a pound of worms (E. hortensis) and have...
fireweed22
how fragile are worms?
I was harvesting vc and really had put some force into...
chazz1100
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™