best light to observe worms

VerminSkumNovember 13, 2012

Hi, I'm looking for a light to use when observing my worm beds. Don't know if I should use a red light, or some sort of UV light that might show the worms easier. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thank You'

Forrest

Urban worm Manager

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Wormsome(3a)

your question reminds me of http://hypernatural.com/digestivemov.html

Amy Young provides some info about 'Seeing Worms' that is a bit technical but maybe something of use for you.

http://hypernatural.com/digestive.html#

just scroll down a bit and you'll find the section 'seeing worms'

w

    Bookmark   November 13, 2012 at 6:54PM
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sbryce_gw

I would use the kind of light that shines from your lighting fixtures when you flip the switch on. Seriously, you aren't going to expose your worms long enough to harm them. If they don't like it, they will run for cover. You will see what you need to see, then cover them back up. No harm done.

    Bookmark   November 14, 2012 at 11:30AM
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mr_yan

By no means am I an expert but I just use the overhead incandescent light that was already mounted where I put my bins. If that light is not enough I'll either grab my LED head lamp or three D-cell MAG Lite - the lighting in my basement is sub-par at best.

My head lamp has a red lamp option. At best you can see shapes with this. I'm unable to really see anything of detail in my worm bin with it.

    Bookmark   November 14, 2012 at 9:40PM
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JerilynnC

Let's see...during the day, Sunlight is an all natural light source. At night, I do what sbryce does and turn on the light in the room with the worms.

There is really no need to try to get fancy here.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2012 at 1:46AM
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VerminSkum

I appreciate the low tech overhead light suggestions. The worm bins I am working with however, are about 40' long. If I had any decent over head light in the room, I would only see a small section before they all dove down. I am trying to observe them without disturbing them for several reasons.

    Bookmark   November 17, 2012 at 9:30AM
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VerminSkum

I appreciate the low tech overhead light suggestions. The worm bins I am working with however, are about 40' long. If I had any decent over head light in the room, I would only see a small section before they all dove down. I am trying to observe them without disturbing them for several reasons.

    Bookmark   November 17, 2012 at 9:57AM
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mendopete

I have read that a flashlight with red cellophane secured with a rubber-band will give you enough light for a peek in a dark room.

    Bookmark   November 18, 2012 at 7:32PM
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JerilynnC

Why even bother with the red cellophane? A 'normal' flashlight won't harm the worms. Think about it, many people use a strong light to harvest them, yes?

    Bookmark   November 18, 2012 at 7:36PM
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mr_yan

VermiScum, hate to say it but your size is far larger than almost all of us on this board. You may have to resort to some experimentation with this one.

The link in the second post mentions IR not bothering worms. This passes a quick common sense test in my mind - longer wave length, less energy, less damaging to cells. There are several IR cameras now available and even some IR vision sets. There are also low light amplification systems out there. Both are the basis for methods of night vision. Both can get really expensive quickly though.

Two cheap IR systems that jump to mind are game trail cameras for hunting and some baby-monitors with video feeds. Something like this may allow you to test it and return it if it does not work as required then step up in quality as you need.

    Bookmark   November 18, 2012 at 10:28PM
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equinoxequinox

VerminSkum, must use your handle because with a handle like that it just cries out for it.

Not quite sure why you want to see the worms. Usually observations are made on the results of the worms works as opposed to the more showy reach into the bin and rake through to get a wiggling writhing mass o worms for the camera. They pretty much just eat, poop and have sex. Which activity were you interested in observing? Are you making a movie? Are your worms going Hollywood?

    Bookmark   November 19, 2012 at 12:51AM
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VerminSkum

Thank you for the suggestions everyone. I think I'll juat use a headlamp with a red light option as it seemed to work well in my garden for collecting "crawlers" for fishing.

    Bookmark   November 19, 2012 at 5:22PM
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PeterK2

Yeah, I think there was some confusion in the posts between 'doing harm' VS 'natural observation'. A red filter might be all you need, works with fishtanks also. Giving time for your eyes to adjust to the dark also.

    Bookmark   November 20, 2012 at 12:29AM
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Aindra(8, BC)

Night vision goggles, anybody?

;)

    Bookmark   November 20, 2012 at 5:16PM
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