Creeping charlie problem

newbee_31April 24, 2010

Hey all! I have been dealing with a horrible creeping charlie problem since we bought our home 4 years ago. Last fall a friend came over and sprayed our yard (I have no idea what he used, but he is a farmer), and yay, charlie was dead. This spring, our lawn is very very thin because so much of the yard was charlie and I have been reseeding and fertilizing like crazy to try and get the grass healthy enough that charlie doesn't have a chance to take over again. The problem? Charlies already coming back and growing so quickly! I swore up and down I would not use chemicals, but one application leads to more. My questions are how often can I apply weed b gone max before it damages the grass and how often should I fertilize? Prior to the herbicide application last fall we had never used any fertilizers or herbicides.

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Kimmsr(4a/5b-MI)

Creeping Charlie, aka Creeping Jenny and ground ivy (and possibly many other names) "Glechoma hederacea", prefers to grow in poorer soils that will not grow a good, healthy turf. So the first step in control is a good, reliable soil test to see what might need be done to improve the soil since your best means of control is a good, healthy turf.
Spraying something to control any weed is simply treating the symptoms of the problem and is not a cure.

Here is a link that might be useful: About Creeping Charlie

    Bookmark   April 29, 2010 at 7:35AM
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Beeone(4 N. Wyo.)

You may have some roots that survived the herbicide treatment last year, or the lawn is well seeded down from years without treatment so you have a lot of seedlings. Your best long term results will be from thickening and re-invigorating the grass, however in the mean time continued treatments when the creeping charlie appears will control the new flushes without harming the established grass. Generally you will not need to treat more than a couple times a year, which will not be excessive or damage your established grass. By keeping the competition from the creeping charlie down, the grass will normally recover and thicken within a couple seasons. Just follow a normal fertilizing schedule, you won't need massive amounts as long as the competition from the creeping charlie can be kept down. This was how I handled the problem a few years ago and it worked well. I think I sprayed once or twice a season when the weeds were well leaved out, and probably fertilized the first year only. (I only fertilize every couple years normally).

    Bookmark   May 1, 2010 at 3:56AM
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Kimmsr(4a/5b-MI)

Spraying any poison is detrimental to the environment you live in and spraying any poison more than once per year is an unnecessary expense. Correct the soil problems that exist, create a good, healthy soil for your grass to grow in and that grass will crowd out any "weeds" that wnat to grow there and most likely the "weeds" won't because they don;t like the soil conditions.

    Bookmark   May 1, 2010 at 8:18AM
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