Question about lasanga gardening on the gallery ...

roselee z8b S.W. TexasMay 20, 2012

Posted by Campruby Zn8Tx (My Page) on Sun, May 20, 12 at 15:47

Anyone ever try lasagna gardening? Does it really work? It sounds wonderful, but I am skeptical. I live in rural southeast Tx where the bahia and nutgrass are prolific and stout.

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roselee z8b S.W. Texas

I put a link on the gallery to this forum so can answer here. Kathy, I know you have some experience and pictures of your success with the lasanga method. Do you think it will smother the plants mentioned above?

    Bookmark   May 20, 2012 at 10:04PM
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ogrose_tx

I used this method, and am a believer - weed problem has been greatly reduced, although still do get airborne weeds, but they're so much easier to pull, and the soil seems to really have benefitted. I put down the cardboard, wet it down really well, and just put mulch on top and I have rock-hard clay soil. Now when I dig down it's so much easier, and have worms, so I figure it's working!

    Bookmark   May 20, 2012 at 11:54PM
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PKponder TX(7b)

Hi Campruby,
Welcome to the Texas GW! Although I wasn't battling nutgrass and bahia, I love lasagna gardening. In my present home, I nearly eradicated asian jasmine and english ivy with a layer of cardboard, layer of compost and heavy mulch. I only put in a few (maybe a dozen) plants the first year but now I garden the entire area. The cardboard is completely gone, I do find random pieces of the tape when I plant. The only place that the unwanted plants return was right next to trees where it's difficult to cover.

    Bookmark   May 21, 2012 at 4:44AM
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carrie751(z7/8 TX)

We used it for our raised veggie beds, and it worked very well.

    Bookmark   May 21, 2012 at 8:25AM
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plantmaven(8b/9a TX)

Yes! It does work. My house is an example. Scroll down until you see my pictures.

Here is a link that might be useful: Lasagna

    Bookmark   May 23, 2012 at 6:55PM
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Lynn Marie

I'm going to chime in on the yes column too. I have several raised beds with veggies in them. They are probably 4-5 years old now. Just make sure you don't skimp on the cardboard. I do have bermudagrass that will get in there via runners, but nothing coming up from under.

    Bookmark   May 24, 2012 at 10:04AM
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lou_texas(8a N Central TX)

plantmaven, I looked at your pics again, and I still love those red poppies!!! : )

Your place is beautiful. Lou

    Bookmark   May 24, 2012 at 11:07AM
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patty_cakes

I have never heard of such a thing! From what i'm seeing and reading the idea seems to work, without the black fabric landscapers use, right? Is this only used for small plantings like flowers? How about a plant~small bush~in a 5 gal container?

    Bookmark   May 28, 2012 at 7:16AM
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patty_cakes

This site pretty much answered my question re:5 gal. plantings. It's amazing what can be learned on these garden forums!! ;o)

Here is a link that might be useful: cardboard..

    Bookmark   May 28, 2012 at 7:32AM
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plantmaven(8b/9a TX)

Patty, we used roofing paper, aka tar paper. This was much easier for us old people :>). We bought the cheapest we could find. Some have questioned the "tar". I had a picture of the huge earthworms I dug up the next year. But can't seem to find it. Tar is an organic and there is so little of it on the paper.

all my beds used roofing paper in Jan/Feb 2008 and these pictures were taken August 2008.

    Bookmark   May 28, 2012 at 9:51AM
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PKponder TX(7b)

it works! This is what we started with

and this is what it looked like later that summer after extensive lasagna gardening... ~600 sq ft

and now after 3 years

    Bookmark   May 30, 2012 at 8:39AM
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patty_cakes

Judging by the pics, I would have to say it certainly *does* work! Seeing the size of the trees makes me think the soil has become very fertile thru the years also. ;o)

    Bookmark   May 30, 2012 at 3:37PM
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