Anyone had success with Cantaloupes?

jackbenny(4/5)February 11, 2007

I'm going to be planting - at last count - 16 different Cantaloupe melons (not the netted kind, those are muskmelons, not cantaloupes) in hopes of finding a variety that will do well around here. (This extreme measure is due to the fact that I've been unable to grow nary a melon to full term for the past two seasons.) Here being the hourglass sands of the Wautoma area. I'm looking for the names of varieties that some of you may have grown around here with success.

On a side note, I was wondering if you call them Muskmelons or Cantaloupes. Growing up, we always called the netted melons muskmelons as is correct, but I've found crates of muskmelons in stores mislabeled "Cantaloupes." In doing research, I've found that in America that it is common for people to misname muskmelons as cantaloupes. I'm curious to find out if maybe calling them muskmelons is a regional thing...you know like "bubbler," or if I'm in the minority.

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zeedman Zone 5 Wisconsin

>"In doing research, I've found that in America that it is common for people to misname muskmelons as cantaloupes."The same way that sweet potatoes in the U.S. are commonly misnamed "yams".

I garden literally just east of you, about a mile away from Highway 21, just outside Omro. I have grown a muskmelon (the green-fleshed "Montreal") and a hybrid cantaloupe called "Ambrosia". Both matured about 50% of their melons before the vines died back.

Mind you, that was with transplants. I start all of my cucurbits (melons, watermelons, squash & cukes) in peat pots; since I am a seed saver, I want to give them the best chance that I can. For melons & most winter squash, starting as transplants can give them just enough of a head start for at least some to reach maturity, except in the worst years. For our zone, I don't believe that direct-seeded plants will be able to mature - unless global warming gives us a longer season. ;-)

    Bookmark   February 12, 2007 at 12:29AM
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elvis

We always call the orange fleshed ones 'cantaloupe' and the others (green, etc.,) 'muskmelons'.

That being said, I had success with 'Minnesota Midgets', and that's all I've ever tried.

This year I'm growing 'Jenny Lind' muskmelon. I also grow sweet potatoes...yup, here in Z3.

We have a very helpful system for extending the growing season--of necessity!

The garden is covered with black plastic with openings cut for the plants. No weeding and hot ground. Also, no dirty knees or shoes!

We made an underground hose system with the water pumped from the lake, so the water is warm and nutrient filled, and when frost threatens, we simply turn on the sprinkler, and voila! No frost.

Just a couple suggestions, as long as we're talking about (zone pushing) growing cantaloupes.

Constance.

    Bookmark   February 12, 2007 at 12:40PM
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vino_man

If you are looking for melons that would succeed in the area, you may want to try the Seed Savers of Decorah, Iowa. They are all heirlooms, and grown in similar zones and sandy conditions.

Another source that I just came across is a Rare Seeds out of Missouri. They have the true authentic Cantaloupes, yes Cantaloupes, from Europe and norther Africa.

    Bookmark   February 19, 2007 at 6:48PM
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tasty

Hi I am planting cantaloupe in a pot in my house what month do plant it inside

    Bookmark   February 21, 2007 at 1:16PM
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jackbenny(4/5)

Thanks for the responses everybody.

"Hi I am planting cantaloupe in a pot in my house what month do plant it inside" -tasty

Tasty, if you're planting your cantaloupe to transplant outside, plant it four weeks before your last predicted frost date.

    Bookmark   February 24, 2007 at 10:58AM
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greenbeans

Just chiming in on the naming question...

I grew up calling the green-fleshed melons honey dew, and the orange-fleshed melons cantaloupe.

I like "honey dew." It's so charming...

    Bookmark   February 24, 2007 at 8:19PM
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tasty

Hi thanks for the info tasty

    Bookmark   February 25, 2007 at 10:28AM
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fez920(Z5)

Whatever you call them--Those round thingies-orange in center--Ambrosia,Gold Star,Harper--Start in peat pots--all do well.Green Bay area

    Bookmark   March 10, 2007 at 8:38PM
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kaoszone

I'm originally from Maryland and we called the orange fleshed netted ones Cantaloupes and the green fleshed ones honey dews also. I'd never heard of a muskmelon until I moved out here. I haven't had much success with either since I moved here. My soil's too rich (and my preschoolers pick them to play catch.)
That being said, however, my parents had a large farm in Maryland and grew about 40 acres of both melon types though and they *love* sandy soil. Dad grew them on plastic mulch and gave them tons of water and they were incredible. Maybe the plastic would help yours? They like warm soil temps.
Just a thought.
Karen

    Bookmark   March 31, 2007 at 9:22AM
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