Russian Sage

osmomJune 12, 2008

Hello, I am hoping you can help me. I dug up one of my Russian sage's to plant where I had lost one this past winter. I also bought a new one to put in the dug up one's spot. Anyways the one I dug up and replanted (in the lost one's spot) looks wilted- its still green. I think I may have put it into shock. Is there anything I can do?

Btw, a day ago I added some soot stimulator to water and watered it with that.

Thanks for the help

Julie

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tsugajunkie z5 SE WI

They wilted when I moved mine in May of last year, so I imagine moving them now would do the same. As you undoubtedly discovered, they have a veeeeeeery long taproot. If we keep getting the rain we've been getting it should recover.

tj

    Bookmark   June 12, 2008 at 6:36PM
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janetpetiole(4b)

I moved mine and it was sulking too, so I was watering it regularly. Now with all the rain it looks ok.

    Bookmark   June 12, 2008 at 8:40PM
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macthayer(z9a NV)

Russian Sage resents being moved -- in case you hadn't noticed. It may "sulk" for quite a long while. Just be patient, and keep it watered without overwatering it, and it should come back. These are hardy plants. When we moved into our new home, I transplanted 6 Russian sages, and I didn't lose any, but they were very "sulky" for quite some time. The one thing I did that I believe helped a lot was to cut back the top right down so that there was only about 3 inches of foliage for the roots to support. This may help in your case if your plant is still "sulky". And don't worry about cutting it back at this stage. It's so early in the season that the only thing it will do is make it bloom slightly later than it would have, and it will be a little shorter -- no harm at all to the plant. MacThayer

    Bookmark   June 23, 2008 at 3:38PM
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pondwelr(z5 WI)

A good idea Macthayer. My Russian Sage has seeded and rooted itself all over a big area of my south border. I want to transplant it all to a backyard spot, but was dis-heartened by the looks of some I dug for a friend.
They still may sulk, but by cutting them down, at least I wont have to see the wilt. Thanks for the good idea.
Pondy

    Bookmark   June 24, 2008 at 6:12PM
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greencatpaws

Hi; I need to move my Russian Sage, I have 3 and want to replant them so they are happy and bushy. Now they are tall but not strong so they are easily blown sideways. AND THE RABBITS think they are a lovely winter salad.
Q: should I trim back in Fall? or cover them somehow to save?
Q: When is the best time to transplant?
THX! PS I live in North/Central Iowa

    Bookmark   September 11, 2010 at 10:45AM
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tsugajunkie z5 SE WI

I have only moved mine in spring. Since they say they overwinter better with their stalks left on, I'd suspect spring is the better time but that's just a guess.

tj

    Bookmark   September 12, 2010 at 11:39PM
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