Lots of blossoms, few fruit

ellenrr(7a)July 6, 2011

Things seemed to be going well until recently, when I noticed that I had many blossoms, but few fruit. And some of the blossoms dry up and fall off.

Any ideas what I should do?

The plant is a Rutgers Ramapo in a big pot. I water it every day. I haven't been fertilizing it. The soil is combination of hummus and compost and some potting soil. And I put some little bit of fertilizer in the mix.

I have a few tomatoes and except for a few yellowing leaves, the plant looks good, but this blossom situation can't be good.

Any feed-back appreciated.

ellen

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terrybull

"And some of the blossoms dry up and fall off"

agrant, phosphorus isnt making the blossoms fall off. if its to hot they will gum up and drop. do a search for blossom drop.

    Bookmark   July 6, 2011 at 4:26PM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

Agree that it is just blossom drop. Normal for much of the country this time of the year.

Dave

Here is a link that might be useful: Blossom Drop FAQ

    Bookmark   July 6, 2011 at 5:22PM
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ellenrr(7a)

thank you.
I will check out the link to blossom drop, and the other link.
I'm glad to read that it may be a normal phenomenon and not the end of my tomato plant!

btw, do most of you fertilize the tomato plant?
If so what do you use?

    Bookmark   July 6, 2011 at 6:49PM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

Yes, even in ground tomato plants need feeding a couple of times during the season. But plants in containers require regular feedings because the nutrients wash out every time you water. Many feed a diluted 1/2 strength fertilizer every 4-7 days. The fertilizer is your choice but if you search the word 'fertilizer' here (search bar is at the bottom of the page) you'll find many discussions about various brands and types.

You don't mention the size of your container and that alone will determine how often it needs to be watered - daily is usually only needed in exceptionally hot and dry weather unless the pot is too small - and fed. Over-watering is harder on the plant than under-watering is.

Dave

    Bookmark   July 6, 2011 at 7:58PM
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Edymnion(7a)

Yeah, its just normal blossom drop. If daytime highs are over about 95 degrees for any extended period it will prevent fertilization of the flowers and they'll die off. Wait a bit for it to cool off (a day or two of rain moving through, for example) and you'll start getting your 'maters.

I've had the same problem, what with being in the South. My Mr. Stripey only had 2 tomatoes growing no matter what I did (shaking, hand pollinating, etc). And then last week we've had scattered thunderstorms and lower temperatures and I've got 3 new tomatoes growing already.

Not much you can do to help it along unless you just feel like installing air conditioning for your tomatoes. =P

    Bookmark   July 7, 2011 at 10:47AM
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ellenrr(7a)

this is what i found re tomato fertilizer-
should have low N, High P and medium K
example- 8-32-15 or 6-24-24

This writer likes "tomato Tone" by espoma. Since I like other espoma products I'm going to try it.

    Bookmark   July 7, 2011 at 4:48PM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

this is what i found re tomato fertilizer-
should have low N, High P and medium K
example- 8-32-15 or 6-24-24

Keep in mind that is just one person's opinion and many will differ with that recommendation, especially with those high P and K ratings. There is no ONE perfect fertilizer for tomatoes and millions of pounds of tomatoes are grown each year using all sorts of fertilizers.

However, whatever you choose you need to focus more on the fact that your plant is in a container, not in the ground. That makes its needs very different as already mentioned. More frequent feedings but using weaker dosages.

Plus a dry fertilizer is very difficult to add to a container without doing root damage. Liquid fertilizers are much easier to use on container plants.

Dave

    Bookmark   July 7, 2011 at 5:39PM
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ellenrr(7a)

good points.
thanks.

    Bookmark   July 8, 2011 at 6:26AM
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