Is this poison ivy?

edger99June 15, 2014

Can someone please tell me if this is poison ivy? Hesitating to pull it out or not.

Thank you!!

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adidas(6/7)

Not sure what it is but it is NOT poison ivy!

Here is a link that might be useful: poison ivy

    Bookmark   June 15, 2014 at 4:18PM
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edger99

Thank you adidas. That link was helpful. I do have some of those very typical poison ivy in my backyard as well. Wanted to make sure this is not some sort of cousin of PI.

    Bookmark   June 15, 2014 at 10:01PM
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adidas(6/7)

You're welcome! Come to think of it...what you have there (I think) is wild strawberry :)!

Here is a link that might be useful: wild strawberry

    Bookmark   June 18, 2014 at 1:20PM
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lecorbeau(7b)

I can't tell the difference from the photo, but it could be mock strawberry, Duchesnea indica, which is invasive. Wild strawberry has white flowers; mock strawberry flowers are yellow. Barren strawberry (Waldsteinia ternata) also has yellow flowers and is native, but the leaves aren't as pointy at the tips.

    Bookmark   June 25, 2014 at 9:35PM
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floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK

It's a Rubus species - either blackberry or raspberry.

Definitely neither strawberry nor mock strawberry.

    Bookmark   July 3, 2014 at 12:48PM
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lecorbeau(7b)

Floral uk,

What are the clues that lead you to rubus? I would like to learn.

Thanks.

    Bookmark   July 3, 2014 at 1:42PM
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adidas(6/7)

Interesting. My property is overrun by Rubus phoenicolasius (wineberry) and I would never have guessed Rubus because these canes don't have the smooth stems of the plant in the pic. Even when very small, the stems are hairy. Do other Rubus sp have such smooth stems?

    Bookmark   July 4, 2014 at 2:41PM
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floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK

I find it hard to explain how I know what plants are. I don't see 'clues' - I just see a clear Rubus species. I have no botanical training - I've just been looking at plants for an awful long time. So I can't describe the features. It's like asking how I can tell my children apart when they share the same physical characteristics - two arms, two legs, etc.

However... the pictured plant has obvious stems with leaves coming off them and a pointed terminal bud. Strawberries and mock strawberries have basal rosettes, not long stems. The individual leaflets in the photo are a different shape and texture too.

And yes, adidas, many Rubus have smooth canes, others have thorns, others have hairs. Rubus covers all the blackberries and raspberries and many other berries e.g wineberries, cloud berries , logan berries etc.

    Bookmark   July 5, 2014 at 10:23AM
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lecorbeau(7b)

I didn't even notice the stems. So the strawberries and mock strawberries will have long runners, but at the end of each runner is another rosette rather than one leaf.
Thanks!

    Bookmark   July 5, 2014 at 10:49AM
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OldDutch(4)

That could very easily be poison ivy or poison oak. It has the smooth ivy stems, the alternate leaf pattern and leaves with three leaflets and the leaflets can be toothed in a variety of ways. Poison ivy is also highly variable. I can't say for sure, but I also will not rule it out. It definitely resembles some of the pictures of poison ivy I have seen. Look it up in Wikipedia for some of them.

Not wild strawberry or any rosette growing plant, and seems to have too smooth a stem for a Rubus, it should be more upright to be a Manitoba maple seedling (box elder). It could be a young Virginia Creeper that still hasn't developed 5 leaves.

Better a bit too careful than a bit too careless, especially with poison ivy.
.

    Bookmark   July 5, 2014 at 11:49AM
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lycopus(z5 NY)

The characteristics are subtle but it looks like Rubus to me as well. If you compare the leaves of Rubus occidentalis to the images in the OP the resemblance is uncanny. Poison ivy is variable but wouldn't have teeth like that. The pattern of the veins and the shape of the lateral leaflets is also consistent with Rubus. It wouldn't be that unusual for such a young specimen to lack obvious prickles though they might be present and not evident in the image.

    Bookmark   July 5, 2014 at 10:14PM
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ctnchpr

It looks like a dewberry.

    Bookmark   July 6, 2014 at 1:07AM
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wisconsitom

And if I'm not mistaken, the various members of Rubus like to wink at each other when in sufficiently close proximity, and you know...interbreed. Adds to the potential for ID'ing confusion.

+oM

    Bookmark   July 10, 2014 at 7:57AM
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