staked tomatoes more or less quit producing

civ_IV_fanAugust 16, 2011

I have three staked tomatoes - one Mr Stripey and two beefmaster. All three are six to seven feet tall, and I pruned most suckers in early growth.

Mr. Stripey hasn't made even one flower and his lower half looks brown and dead.

The beefmasters both started strong and gave me 10-12 tomatoes between them by the first week of august. But now I only have like two small ripening tomatoes. The beefmasters also look yellow and dead-ish on the lower half while the upper halfs look green and strong.

This is my first time with tomatoes. Can I expect or encourage a second round of tomatoes? Should the bottoms of the vines be yellowing and looking dead? If Mr. Stripey hasn't produced yet, can I give up on him?

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dickiefickle(5B Dousman,Wi.)

Can you provide a picture ?
What are they planted in ?

Did you fertilize your plants?

    Bookmark   August 16, 2011 at 2:09PM
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civ_IV_fan

I will provide a picture. They are planted in a border bed, more or less an amended topsoil. I fertilized with 10-10-10 type pellets in mid June.

I am in an urban setting and sunlight can be dappled. When we moved in, tomatoes in that same spot grew pretty well, but the fact is they are only getting about 6-7 hours of direct sunlight a day. I'm wondering if that has something to do with it.

    Bookmark   August 16, 2011 at 2:46PM
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missingtheobvious(Blue Ridge 7a)

6 hours of direct sun is considered "full sun." Tomatoes would be happy with that. For instance, for many years I grew tomatoes right up against the east wall of a house: no sun after noon. They did fine.

That amount of dappled sun might be a problem.

    Bookmark   August 16, 2011 at 4:24PM
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civ_IV_fan




Sorry about the picture quality.

    Bookmark   August 19, 2011 at 12:07PM
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qaguy

How's the weather been? Hot and/or humid conditions can
prevent fruiting.

I'm in SoCal and I get fruit early in the summer and then
the heat hits and I get very little fruit set until it
cools down some.

    Bookmark   August 19, 2011 at 8:22PM
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missingtheobvious(Blue Ridge 7a)

Really hot weather (highs above 90-95, overnight lows above 75) prevents tomato pollination/fruitset. Really high humidity can do the same. However, there should still have been flowers.

    Bookmark   August 19, 2011 at 9:02PM
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civ_IV_fan

the more i watch the spot, the more i think it is a simple lack of sun. i live in a sort of complicated urban sun environment, with part sun/ shade and full sun/shade all mixed together. i think two of my shrubs are starting to shade out the tomatoes after noon, plus the sycamore above seems to have filled out substantially this year, blocking almost all sun before noon. it is kind of hard to tell because i'm at work all day so today (saturday) i'm going to see when they start getting sun.

    Bookmark   August 20, 2011 at 8:35AM
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