Violent behavior linked to Nutritional Deficiencies

silversword(9A)September 17, 2013

Could the increase in violence be due to anything other than guns?

WASHINGTON, DC,, Aug. 30, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE)

-- Deficiencies of vitamins A, D, K, B1, B3, B6, B12 and folate, and of minerals iodine, potassium, iron, magnesium, zinc, chromium and manganese can all contribute to mental instability and violent behavior, according to a report published in the Spring 2013 issue of Wise Traditions, the journal of the Weston A. Price Foundation.
The article, Violent Behavior: A Solution in Plain Sight by Sylvia Onusic, PhD, CNS, LDN, seeks reasons for the increase in violent behavior in America, especially among teenagers.

"We can blame violence on the media and on the breakdown of the home," says Onusic, "but the fact is that a large number of Americans, living mostly on devitalized processed food, are suffering from malnutrition. In many cases, this means their brains are starving."

In fact, doctors are seeing a return of nutritional deficiency diseases such as scurvy and pellagra, which were declared eradicated long ago by public health officials. Many of these conditions cause brain injuries as well.

Symptoms of pellagra, for example, include anxiety, hyperactivity, depression, fatigue, headache, insomnia and hallucinations. Pellagra is a disease caused by deficiency of vitamin B3. Zinc deficiency is linked with angry, aggressive, and hostile behaviors that result in violence. The best dietary sources of zinc are red meat and shellfish.

Leaky gut and gluten sensitivities may exacerbate nutrient deficiencies. Gluten intolerance is strongly linked with schizophrenia.

"Making things worse are excitotoxins so prevalent in the food supply, such as MSG and Aspartame," says Onusic. "People who live on processed food and who drink diet sodas are exposed to these mind-altering chemicals at very high levels." In an effort to curb child obesity, the dairy industry recently petitioned FDA to include aspartame and other artificial sweeteners in dairy beverages featured in school lunches, without appropriate labeling. Recent research has established the fact that aspartame actually leads to weigh gain because of its effect on insulin.

Other ingredients in the food supply linked to violent behavior include sugar, artificial colors and flavorings, caffeine, alcohol and soy foods. The toxic environmental burden includes mercury, arsenic, lead, fire retardants, pesticides, heavy metals and Teflon. Adding psychiatric drugs to this mix puts everyone at risk.

"The only solution to the mounting levels of violence is a return to real, nutrient-dense food," says Sally Fallon Morell, president of the Weston A. Price Foundation. "We must create a culture in which eating processed food is seen as uncool, and in which home cooking is embraced as a life-enhancing skill."

The Weston A. Price Foundation has pointed out the poor nutritional quality of school lunches and the flaws in the USDA dietary guidelines, which schools receiving federal funding are required to follow. At a press conference in January, 2010, the Foundation proposed guidelines that include eggs, organ meats and healthy animal fats. "Our brains need cholesterol to function properly," said Fallon Morell, "and our children need cholesterol-rich food for optimal mental and emotional development." Studies have shown that depressed individuals, offenders who show the most violent behavior, and the most violent suicides have low cholesterol levels.

Here is a link that might be useful: Link

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
demifloyd(8)

So why aren't the starving kids in India and Africa on rampages?

    Bookmark   September 17, 2013 at 2:33PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
silversword(9A)

Maybe they have too few resources? Simply trying to survive - plus they aren't being fed a bunch of absolute junk... when they eat, they eat what they've been eating for generations.

Kind of like how obese people may really be starving to death.

I don't know, just making a guess...

    Bookmark   September 17, 2013 at 2:43PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
demifloyd(8)

Interesting, anyway.

Another book is about about the downside of grain--Grain Brain.

    Bookmark   September 17, 2013 at 2:47PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

When kids in Africa get a little older and get access to guns they often do rampage.

A starving small child is of course too young and weak for this.

    Bookmark   September 17, 2013 at 3:08PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
demifloyd(8)

Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
Tue, Sep 17, 13 at 15:08

When kids in Africa get a little older and get access to guns they often do rampage.

A starving small child is of course too young and weak for this.

*

Another excuse for pirates?

    Bookmark   September 17, 2013 at 3:11PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
rob333

They are on rampages in India. But it's the poor who don't eat well whoo also must suffer from the rampages. Instead, the Dalit, who eat the poorest, die from being disallowed water from proper sources, discriminated against, homes burned down, raped, murdered, and other atrocities I shall not go into.

Nutrition is made up of many varied hues. But It is not solely from nutrients that make/break a person's psyche. Cyclical violence being perpetrated and is witnessed by younger genrations. They're carefully taught in India to hurt the Dalit. Just because you picked India. It's ok to be rotten to this caste system in their eyes. If I could, I'd rescue them all and help them any way I could.

Here is a link that might be useful: Violence AGAINST the Dalit

    Bookmark   September 17, 2013 at 3:11PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
rob333

I dunno, would you go "crazy" (nutrient filled or not) if you were Bikram? And he's not the one perpetrating the violence. From today's paper:

"Report by Priyabrata Nayak, Bhubaneswar: For 13-year-old Bikram, a dalit student in Kendrapada district, mid-day meals at school has been a painful and humiliating experience. Bikram along with 50 other dalit students studying of Chakada Sashua School, have been barred from attaining classes, as they opposed this unethical practice by the school authority.

Bikram, a class VII student came all the way from his village to air his grievances against this disparity, at a public hearing on ‘Mid-day meal’ organized by Right To Food Campaign, Odisha, here on Tuesday.

He alleged, during this Ganesh Puja in the school all the students belongs to the dalit castes were asked to stay away from performing the rituals along with the upper-class students. When they vowed to lodge a police complaint, some anti-socials are threatening them with dire consequences. Amid threatening dalit students are forced to shun their class.

'Acting on the directives of the school authority, the cook in our school forced us sit separately from the upper caste students during mid-day meal. Few days back I was assaulted and humiliated by the lady who prepares our mid-day meal and my fault was that I touched the salt jar. It’s very painful for me to go to the school any further,' said Bikram.

“Sometimes the food is almost thrown at the plates of dalit students from a distance and frequently most of the food given to upper-class students,” he added.

Ashok Mallik, secretary of National Confederation of Dalit Organization said the differential treatment mated out by the school authority has left the dalit students in a state of misery.
“When Bikram’s parents complaint over this matter, the school committee suppressed the issue very trickily then. But later on this sarcastic practice continued to hunt the feelings of innocent pupils. They feel embrace and avoids to go to school,” Mallik alleged.

This is not the lone story of discrimination at this particular school in the state. According to a study carried out by Indian Institute of Dalit Studies (IIDS), twenty percent of students left hungry as they served inadequate quantity of food. Another 20 percent said dalit children were not allowed to serve food, whereas other 14 percent alleged separate seating arrangements during mid-day meals. Likewise 13 percent pupil complained that food dropped on their plate from a distance.."

Maybe I'd feel differently, if we were saying nutrition in America is "affecting" violence.

Here is a link that might be useful: Dalit students protesting

    Bookmark   September 17, 2013 at 3:21PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jodik_gw

Yes, Silver, it very well could. I brought this up in another thread in which we were discussing nutrition and foods, but the idea and the article I brought to the thread got little to no response.

Our environment and what we consume are inundated with chemicals, forming a mixed soup...and we have no idea of long term effects due to exposure.

I'm willing to bet this is a part of our societal problems...

    Bookmark   September 17, 2013 at 5:04PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
cookie8(zone 5 ON)

I just finished reading his book, Nutrition and Physical Degeneration. It is an interesting read. I can't believe the medical community overlooks much of it.
If this is your thing, I would definitely recommend this book. I got mine from the library - after a 18 month wait. Oh, and the book is old, it dates to his travels in the 1930's when he did his research.

    Bookmark   September 17, 2013 at 6:58PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
nancy_in_venice_ca Sunset 24 z10

Another excuse for pirates?

I hope this was written tongue in cheek.

    Bookmark   September 17, 2013 at 9:23PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
momj47(7A)

Deficiencies of vitamins A, D, K, B1, B3, B6, B12 and folate, and of minerals iodine, potassium, iron, magnesium, zinc, chromium and manganese

To be deficient in that many nutrients, you'd have to stop eating entirely.

And who is Sylvia Onusic? About Sylvia P. Onusic, PhD, LDN, CNS Licensed and board-certified nutritionist, writer and researcher. BS in Home Economics, Foods and Nutrition Education;, MS in Health Administration; PhD in Public Health Education; completed the dietetic program at Penn State, University and the CNS Certified Nutrition Specialist program. Fulbrighter to Slovenia in Public Health. Speaker at Weston A. Price Foundation Conference and International Raw Milk Symposiums. Member of the American College of Nutrition. Creator and tour leader for "Taste of Slovenia, a Real Food Tour."

Hmm............

    Bookmark   September 17, 2013 at 9:48PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
october17(5chgo)

I think we have evolved on a mostly vegetarian diet. One without pesticides and fungicides. The current American diet, with it's lack of vegetative nutrition and inclusion of toxins, probably plays a huge part in psychiatric issues.

Some people here on HT could use some Zinc maybe.

    Bookmark   September 17, 2013 at 9:50PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
momj47(7A)

No, we didn't evolve on a mostly vegetarian diet. If we had, we would still be back hiding in the forests.

The great evolutionary leap for humans is the result of meat eating, and especially cooking meat to eat it, and cooking vegetables too, of course. When food is cooked, it's much easier for the body to absorb nutrients, so man could spend less time hunting and gathering. And with the increase in nutrients the brain and body evolve to be smarter and faster and stronger. It also meant that babies were healthier and better able to survive, because the mother was stronger and healthier, in relative terms. And so there were more of us.

Don't confuse a 21st Century "vegetarian" diet with a paleolithic vegetarian diet of roots, a few fruits and very few actual vegetables. By 10,000 BCE, man was learning to farm, but just, so the crops were very poor in nutrients. And until recently, man was more likely to be the prey, not the predator.

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 12:03AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
october17(5chgo)

I guess you are right momj47. Of course you are.

How much of human evolution has taken place since 10,000 BC?

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 5:59AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
tobr24u(z6 RI)

Damn those Twinkies!

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 6:49AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
pnbrown

"I guess you are right momj47. Of course you are."

Of course, not necessarily. She is presenting one school of thought popular with some scholars. There are other scenarios indicated by evidence as well. One problem with the theory is our long intestine.

Regarding the OP, it makes total sense to me. The food supply is shockingly impoverished. Truly, I do not know how anyone could survive solely on modern processed foods, as some do. Not very well.

If we look at people now in their middle age, we find that on average, their health is not so good. Now consider that people in their 50's and 60's were raised - even if they ate all processed foods - on stuff not as impoverished as today's supply, because crop breeding and soil impoverization have both accrued a lot toward demineralization of crops since 40 or 50 years ago.

Apparently some studies indicate that the sharp rise in allergies in the last couple decades could be connected to the change in wheat, which is constantly being "improved" for ever more protein, and probably ever less digestibility. This is not the wheat our ancestors were eating in Europe two or three hundred years ago.

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 7:24AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
momj47(7A)

LOL - How much of human evolution has taken place since 10,000 BCE?

You are kidding, aren't you? Apparently not as much as some of us think.

Computers were pretty primitive back then, so we've made progress there.

This is 4000 years of history.

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 7:40AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jodik_gw

Mom, there is no way my eyes can read that... is there a summary somewhere, by chance?

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 7:45AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
momj47(7A)

No, It's terribly small, isn't it. I had to copy and save it and make it bigger to read it. It's interesting, though, to see things side by side.

There's another one, but it's even harder to read

Here is a link that might be useful: Link

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 8:01AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
pnbrown

Mom, the map looks quite interesting, although like Jodik I can't make out much of it.

Not sure how your comment re: last 10k years is relevant to the issue of whether hominids were serious red-meat eaters. Since, as you say, our bodies have changed extremely little for many millennia, then the presence of the long intestine indicates that we did not eat much meat pre-fire.

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 8:04AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
labrea_gw

one other factor in addition to diet that has been suggested is exposure to lead.

Here is a link that might be useful: Lead in the head

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 8:18AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lionheart_gw

"Since, as you say, our bodies have changed extremely little for many millennia, then the presence of the long intestine indicates that we did not eat much meat pre-fire."

Actually, in comparison to other animals, we have mid-sized intestines. Herbivores have much longer intestines and/or multiple "stomach compartments" (ruminants, for example) or proportionately larger cecums for breaking down vegetative matter and extracting more nutrients and calories from food.

Carnivores have smaller intestines than we have.

Compared to herbivores, our digestive system is much simpler. In that regard, it more closely resembles the digestive systems of carnivores.

Humans can't digest cellulose. It's utterly useless to them. Technically speaking, no vertebrate can directly digest cellulose, but herbivores have gut bacteria that will break down cellulose; humans do not have this.

It takes a lot of eating and digesting to power a 300-400 pound gorilla or a 1,000 pound cow. Ever notice how much of their day is consumed (ha!) by foraging and eating and digesting? :-)

Anyhow, humans have been eating meat for at least 2 million years, possibly longer. The deliberate cooking of food appears to have happened sometime after that - about 1.4 MYA. I don't know how long you have to be doing something before it's considered "natural".

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 10:35AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
TxanGoddess

It seems like I recall reading in a Pollan book that the intelligence of a species increases with the diversity of it's diet. I remember very distinctly that put forth the claim that koalas for example, had decreased in intelligence with their eucalyptus only diet (they had once been wider ranging herbivores).

Anyway, that was a digression based on the evolution of our diet sidebar.

It makes perfect sense to me that the excitotoxins in particular are part of a cause of the culture of violence.

My younger brother struggled with hyperactivity when we were kids, and my parents were advised (read: commanded) to put him on Ritalyn by a few different schools. Well, my mother wasn't down with that, so she put him on the Feingold Diet (no artificial colorings or flavorings, no preservatives). And I know it's gotten its fair share of knocks, but I'm a believer. My cousin was also on it ... you could take either of these boys and have them behaving nicely enough for an audience with the Pope, give them a red or an orange soda, and they'd be bouncing off the walls no matter what rewards were promised (or punishments threatened).

That kids are eating so many more of these excitotoxins even now compared to when the three of us were kids, and simultaneously being expected to be even more sedentary for many more hours if not the whole day is a recipe for a mental fubar imo.

I'm surprised our society is even working at the level it does, when I really stop to think about it.

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 10:50AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
silversword(9A)

Texan, do you mind me asking what year-ish your brother was put on that diet?

I'm a believer too.

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 12:58PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
pnbrown

Here is an interesting timeline regarding diet and other developments from hundreds of millions of years ago, with many references to scholarly works:

Here is a link that might be useful: omnivory

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 4:58PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
pnbrown

From reading the wiki entry on digestive physiology of animals it seems that modern humans/chimps are very similar to rats and pigs digestively.

In the case of modern humans the use of fire to cook food is a total break-out-of-the-box. Although our physiognomy has had little time to adapt to cooked foods, nevertheless cooked foods allow us an immense range of nutrient sources especially plant-based. Pre-fire indeed it would have been very difficult to be healthy on a pure plant-based diet whereas now it is easily managed.

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 6:01PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lionheart_gw

That's a good timeline. Thanks for posting it.

Cooking food also kills parasites and makes most foods easier to eat. This would have been a big advantage to prehistoric humans.

Having lost quite a few molars over the years, I can testify about how hard it is to eat raw carrots when there are empty spaces where teeth once lived in the back of the mouth. :-)

Carrots are one of the few veggies I like, so now it's either cooked or none (I'm currently being evaluated for some strategically placed implants). Prehistoric humans didn't have dentists.

And, well, killing parasites for which there were no treatments also had to help with general health and perhaps increased longevity.

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 6:34PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
elvis

"That kids are eating so many more of these excitotoxins even now compared to when the three of us were kids, and simultaneously being expected to be even more sedentary for many more hours if not the whole day is a recipe for a mental fubar imo.

I'm surprised our society is even working at the level it does, when I really stop to think about it."

It's not working so well, is it? it's not just the kids eating "these excitotoxins," it's a large part of the population. Probably moreso the uneducated portion of the population, IOW they don't know any better. And the ads says the stuff is delicious and nutritious.

What do we do about that?

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 7:33PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mylab123(z5NW)

"What do we do about that?"
Excellent question, IMO Elvis.

I believe that a very good start would be our society to insist upon truth in advertising.

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 10:43PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
TxanGoddess

Not at all silversword ... lemme see ... I believe I was 8 years old myself, which would make it 1985 or 1986. My brother is 3.5 years younger than me, so he was 4 or 5 depending on the time of year when we started ;).

Beyond hyperactivity, my brother had also been very sickly and losing weight as well. My aunt had been through a similar experience with a cousin who is a year older than I am, and she advised my mom that a new diet might be worth a try.

I was a pretty focused book-wormy kid, so I didn't need the help, but I was pretty much on the diet then too. My mother made an exception for a few of the natural foods my brother couldn't have, like my favorite Granny Smith apples (fruits with salicilates are forbidden on the diet, though I've long forgotten why).

It worked okay. He's a beast now! Runs a gym for a living lol.

ETA: sorry elvis, I just saw your post too, after responding to silver.

I'm not sure what we should do comprehensively of course. But I think a really good first step would be to revamp our agriculture laws in a really big way to make corn and soy less profitable, and therefore produce less of a glut.

Not that they are specifically excitotoxins, I'm not sure they are, though they may be too, I really don't know. But their widespread prevalence in nearly everything from canned goods to boxed dinners cannot be good for us. Especially when they are GMO crops too.

When we talk about processed foods, it's an easy thing to say. But canned, pickled, dried and jellied foods are pretty traditional and don't violate ... well let's go with the Pollan food rules if you will. And yet even they are also full of HFCS nowadays because we created an ag culture where the race was to the one most profitable crop (corn) and then had to create a food culture to use that corn, and now we're feeding a constant cycle.

Just the best idea I have at the moment for a jump off point.

This post was edited by TxanGoddess on Wed, Sep 18, 13 at 22:58

    Bookmark   September 18, 2013 at 10:45PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jodik_gw

Ah, yes... thank you, Mom. Much better.

It's not really so much WHAT we eat, but how it's been processed and adulterated and changed by human hands, read as corporations, that is distressing and unnatural to our bodies... to put it in abridged terms.

We quite obviously developed, or evolved, to be omnivores... we can eat and digest both animal and plant matter. But that's not what's harming us. It's how those things are changed through production and processing that is harming us... and it's all to make a buck.

    Bookmark   September 19, 2013 at 9:38AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
TxanGoddess

I've "Liked" a page called anti gmo foods and fluoride water on facebook, and they just linked up to the list below, which I found pretty interesting.

One baddie they do not discuss in this article is azodicarbonamide which is used in rubber and foamed plastics, also in ... bread. Sounds disgusting doesn't it? Sorry the page only gives me one chance to link ... google it.

Here is a link that might be useful: 20 Ingredients to Memorize and Avoid

    Bookmark   September 23, 2013 at 6:42AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
pnbrown

Salt, soy, and corn all have their place in our diet, but not in the ways and amounts that the food industry uses them.

    Bookmark   September 23, 2013 at 7:14AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
cookie8(zone 5 ON)

Soy should be non-gmo as with the corn (good luck finding any). And if you do eat the gmo version you would be better off eating it in rotation and not as a staple which unfortunately is hard to avoid because both these products are in abundance in processed foods. Popcorn is usually made with non-gmo corn. A new great oil I have been playing around with is avocado oil.

    Bookmark   September 23, 2013 at 8:08AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jodik_gw

We lean toward coconut oil of the cold pressed variety... but there are other oils that are healthy.

GMO is distressing because unless everything is labeled specifically, we don't know that it has been modified, or how it's been modified, for what purpose. And we have no real "long term" to look at for health comparisons.

What blows my mind is how many harmful substances, whether known or potential, are allowed by the very government agencies charged with helping to preserve American health through our food source.

I wonder at the price our health was sold for...

    Bookmark   September 23, 2013 at 9:57AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
pnbrown

Cookie, you can find it in your garden if I send you seed of Hickory King and you plant it come spring....

    Bookmark   September 23, 2013 at 1:39PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
cookie8(zone 5 ON)

Sure. I can send you an e-mail as the one I have linked to gardenweb is kind of messed up. I will include my e-mail address. Thanks.

    Bookmark   September 23, 2013 at 1:55PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sjerin

Without having read all these posts, I want to mention that my middle daughter used to react to artificial dyes, all of them, by turning very angry. It was actually fascinating to watch the change in her eyes, and then her behavior, but a huge pain to deal with. So the poor girl and her sisters had to grow up without jello, pop and colored candy. Yeah, I don't really mean that was a bad thing.

What still gets me is the fact that doctors don't seem to understand this possibility and, as far as I know, don't pass it on to new parents.

    Bookmark   September 23, 2013 at 3:24PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
cookie8(zone 5 ON)

Sjerin - that is me and dairy. I get "ragey" if I have anything with milk in it. I can do whole whipped cream with no additives and most hard cheeses. Anything else, I have to spend the next twelve hours alone, or I should spend the next twelve hours alone.

    Bookmark   September 23, 2013 at 4:54PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sjerin

I'm smiling at your last sentence, cookie. I asked 24-year-old daughter recently whether it still happens to her if she should happen to ingest coloring, and she said that it does. Every once in awhile she'll eat colored candy and has to isolate herself. :)

Gotta wonder how much bad behavior by kids is prompted by a problem with what they eat!

    Bookmark   September 23, 2013 at 7:36PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
pnbrown

I was on a job site the other day talking to a concrete truck driver I hadn't seen in a long time. Turned out he had been out of work over a year with severe colitis. He went to many different doctors until finally being put on some kind of very powerful "cancer" medication. I asked him what did they tell him about diet and he said no doctor told him any change of diet was indicated.

I looked up colitis and it is the same deal, it is not believed to have any strong link to diet. Does that make any sense? That a severe intestinal problem has nothing to do with a typical modern diet?

    Bookmark   September 24, 2013 at 7:34AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jodik_gw

On a cellular level, everything is linked to diet... but medical school isn't about diet or nutrition or how it's linked to our overall health. This is an area that doctors have to study on their own. Mine did.

I've been very pleasantly surprised several times in the recent past at how small changes in diet and supplementation have wrought huge positive results in health.

For example, my husband has traded his ADD medication for the proper dose of iodine... with excellent results! Who knew?!

    Bookmark   September 24, 2013 at 7:46AM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Oh, Golly, shoulda seen this coming: Westboro to picket Nimoy funeral
don't know The Inquisitr's stance or standing, but...
sylviatexas2
This made me cry. So beautiful.
Jacob is beautiful. Wonderful letter, please read. Happy...
enmc
GOP flawed charge that Obama's immigration policy is unconstitutional
GOP leaders have been gloating that the courts agree...
dublinbay z6 (KS)
Living in terror in the Middle East - ISIL kidnapping Christians
ISIS Continues Its Assault on Christianity With Latest...
momj47
And now Gov. Walker - is it "pile on the President" week?
Gov. Scott Walker: ‘I don't know’ whether Obama...
momj47
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™