Thinking of next year's maters

ilovecucumbersAugust 9, 2014

I currently have late blight. The woman at my local ag extension advised me not to grow maters in those beds for 3 years.

No problem. I have other beds I can grow them in. But now I can't stop thinking about the spores. The spores. The damn spores. Have some of those spores drifted into the other raised beds--the ones the I grew onions or cukes in?

I am spore obsessed. If they float and settle everywhere, why wouldn't they also get into the other raised beds?

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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

They very well may but as I mentioned in your other post p. infestans requires living tissue to survive the winter. That's why it is aka the potato plague because it can survive on potatoes or other root crops left in the ground.

Whether or not you choose to not use those beds again next year is your choice. Many do it with no problems as the fungus requires very specific environmental conditions to survive or to develop. One reason why it is the least common of the many tomato diseases. Plus there are always ways of treating potentially infested soil to reduce the odds.

There is a wealth of research info on LB available from very reliable sources so now that you have experienced it it would pay to research it well so that you know what are valid concerns and what aren't.

Dave

    Bookmark   August 9, 2014 at 5:09PM
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ilovecucumbers

I have been researching the topic, but there's a lot to take in, with conflicting points of view. I'll have lots to read about this winter.

Although blight may have done them in eventually, these were huge heirloom maters (no resistance) AND they were planted too close. I planted them 3 feet part, as per growing instructions, but they just grew into one another, and pretty soon it was just a jungle. No air circulation. People always tell you not to prune your tomato foliage, and I took that too literally. I've not been growing maters for 20 years--this is my 4th year. Garden and learn. And read.

    Bookmark   August 9, 2014 at 8:55PM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

What sorts of conflicting information are you finding on Late Blight? For example, no tomato variety has resistance to Late Blight and pruning or plant spacing are also irrelevant. When LB spores are in the area and the weather conditions are right - cool and wet - it will infect any tomato plant regardless.

Cornell University Extension is one of the most authoritative sites for info on Late Blight. And the specific disease even has its own monitoring organization with up to date news at http://usablight.org/

Dave

Here is a link that might be useful: Cornell Ext. - Late Blight

    Bookmark   August 9, 2014 at 9:19PM
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ilovecucumbers

The conflicting information is on whether or not it's okay to grow in the same spot the next season.

Your post made it clear that there wasn't anything I could have done. I was feeling guilty about the spacing and the dense foliage, I guess.

Thank you for the links.

    Bookmark   August 9, 2014 at 10:42PM
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seysonn(8a WA/HZ 1)

The conflicting information is on whether or not it's okay to grow in the same spot the next season.
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I think rotating is irrelevant when it comes to air borne diseases and LB is air borne. LB fungi, bacteria (whatever it is ) cannot survive in the soil. That is what I have gathered.

    Bookmark   August 21, 2014 at 10:24PM
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Daniel_NY(7a)

In mid January this year we had 5' F. Is that cold enough to kill those little gizmos ?

    Bookmark   August 22, 2014 at 9:10AM
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digdirt2(6b-7a No.Cent. AR HZ8 Sun-35)

In mid January this year we had 5' F. Is that cold enough to kill those little gizmos ?

They tend to just go dormant, not die, when exposed to cold. Live fungus spores have been found in the arctic. :)

Dave

    Bookmark   August 22, 2014 at 11:35AM
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