Prolific PL won't stop - genetic anomaly?

EBHarveyOctober 29, 2011

I have a single Plattefoot Brandywine that I grew in a container isolated from all my other plants. It has been cranking out tomatoes for months and as of this morning when it started snowing, was still flowing and setting fruit - its almost November! All of my other plants, of every variety, have long-since succumbed to late blight, withered, and died-off. Fearing a hard freeze, I just picked the remaining green fruit off it - probably close to 4 pounds worth.

So my question - is this just what happens when a plant never catches blight? Do all tomatoes have this potential, or is this plant a genetic anomaly? Of course, I saved seeds so I can at least try to answer this question next year, but does anyone have any input or had a similar experience with a plant that just wouldn't quit?

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carolyn137(z4/5 NY)

Just to say that you're referring to Yellow Brandywine ( Platfoot) so folks don't think it's a Brandywine, which is pink. Seeds to me from Gary Platfoot of Ohio who lives near where Yellow Bandywine was first known and named and a strain that I and others hgave found to be much better than the seeds circulating for Yellow Brandyine.

I've had many varieties that continues to produce well and do so until they were cut down by a hard frost. If I let the weeds go they could protect from a light frost by taking the brunt of that, but not a hard frost.

So I take it no frosts in you area yet.

(So my question - is this just what happens when a plant never catches blight? Do all tomatoes have this potential, or is this plant a genetic anomaly? Of course, I saved seeds so I can at least try to answer this question next year, but does anyone have any input or had a similar experience with a plant that just wouldn't quit?)

I think it depends on which specific diseases you refer to when you say blight since that word is often used to indicate a sick tomato plant.

Where I live we don't have serious problems with soilborne systemic diseases, but do have the common foliage pathogens.

And I do find that most of my PL varieties tend to do better with the foliage pathogens and have suggested in the past that it could be due to the thicker epidermis of PL leaves.

But I have absolutely no proof of that and while some would agree with me, some wouldn't.

So near the end of the season I can see many PL varieties hanging in there while those with certain foliage infections have bit the dust.

Hope that helps.

Carolyn

    Bookmark   October 29, 2011 at 1:20PM
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abayomi

I live in a frost free country and have a few varieties of brandywine started. Will see how many years they last.

    Bookmark   October 29, 2011 at 3:32PM
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