So what did they find on Mars?

zofieNovember 22, 2012

The suspense is killing me. What is your guess on what they may have found? I think they found Twinkies.

..."There's no word on what they've found quite yet, but researchers are willing to say that it's something big. Like, historical event big." ...

Here is a link that might be useful: Mars Rover

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vgkg(Z-7)

I suspect that this new news will relate to the presence of organic carbon being discovered in the soil, possibly from decomposed microbe deposits which once inhabited the ancient seas on Mars. If so this would add weight to NASA's findings of fossilized microbes in a Mars rock over a decade ago (found inside a meteor discovered near the south pole of Earth, it was blasted off of Mars via an impact several thousand years ago). When NASA made that announcement they were confronted with skepticism back then even though they also painstakingly went through the evidence. That previous discovery is still unresolved with debate so NASA is being extra sure before releasing this new discovery. The idea is that the ancient Martian seas were too short lived to evolve much more than just rudimentary microscopic organisms and this rover's main goal was to find definitive proof that they once existed, just as they did in the Earth's early seas.

...either that or the rover stumbled across a crashed alien spaceship...

    Bookmark   November 22, 2012 at 5:43PM
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jodik_gw

I couldn't guess... though I would imagine there's probably a lot of heat and controversy should any sort of discovery be even remotely related to human origin or life discovered in a differing mode than what many theologians would have the world believe...

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 3:59AM
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tobr24u(z6 RI)

Maybe a sex scandal...

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 5:06AM
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sgtksw05(9A)

It was a penny that said "Made in China", dated 2025 and clearly left behind by a time traveling astronauts.

They just thought we wouldnt catch on.....

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 8:09AM
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pnbrown

No, of course it was a yen note with "E pluribus Chinum" on it, from 2125.

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 8:27AM
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tobr24u(z6 RI)

Stop picking on our new friends!

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 8:38AM
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Elly_NJ(NJ z6)

What they didn't find:
Arabian ostrich
Atitlan Grebe
Bali Tiger
Barbary Lion
Bubal Hartebeest
Bushwren
Canarian Black Oystercatcher
Cape Verde Giant Skink
Caribbean Monk Seal
Carolina Parakeet
Caspian Tiger
Caucasian Wisent
Colombian Grebe
Crescent Nail-tail Wallaby
Golden Toad
Grand Cayman Thrush
Guam Flying Fox
Hawai'i 'O'o
Heath Hen
Japanese Sea Lion
Javan Tiger
Kaua'i 'O'o
Laughing Owl
Laysan Rail
Little Swan Island Hutia
Palestinian Painted Frog
Paradise Parrot
Passenger Pigeon
Pyrenean Ibex
Roque Chico de Salmor Giant Lizard
Round Island Burrowing Boa
Ryukyu Wood-pigeon
Santo Stefano Lizard
Schomburgk's Deer
South Island Piopio
Tasmanian Wolf
Thylacine
Thicktail Chub
Toolache Wallaby
Western Black Rhinoceros
Wake Island Rail

STOP looking for life on other planets and start taking care of the life on ours.

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 9:01AM
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jodik_gw

"STOP looking for life on other planets and start taking care of the life on ours."

And our planet, itself.

Now, there's a novel thought... why don't WE mention that from time to time? Oh, wait... we do!

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 9:38AM
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vgkg(Z-7)

"STOP looking for life on other planets and start taking care of the life on ours."

We can and should do both, it'll enable us to better understand the nature of life itself and perhaps help us to preserve what we have here on the Earth. It's the only Earth we have and even finding another "earth-like" planet still won't be another Earth. We evolved here, we're stuck with just this one planet that fits our needs and we fit into it's native environmental parameters like a million sided piece of jigsaw puzzle, there is no substitute.

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 9:55AM
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ohiomom

"the suspense is killing me"

Me too :)

Jodik I had the same thought.

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 10:09AM
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hamiltongardener(CAN 6a)

OK vgkg... saving the planet we have has been mentioned now.

Does this thread go in the countdown yet?

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 10:11AM
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labrea_gw

Jimmy Hoffa

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 10:14AM
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vgkg(Z-7)

HG, no countdown applies...yet, need the magic word(s) to pass the more specific test.

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 10:26AM
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Elly_NJ(NJ z6)

In the last 50 years we couldn't find alternative sustainable energy but we can send rovers to mars.

Thank about the motives to pursue resources on other planets. All they want is fuel and ways to dominate. Another planet is just another source of oil, gas, etc. The Middle East will have the Gulf, and we will have Mars.

I'd love to see how the big oil companies fund these adventures.

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 10:31AM
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shymilfromchi

I am fascinated by the technology used to put Curiosity together; the hundreds (or thousands) of parts that seem to work so flawlessly. Its been such a short time in the history of mankind for the NASA scientists to be able to put this complex machine onto another plane, not only to take pictures, but to sniff the atmosphere, do an analyse of the rocks, and send the information back to earth. Amazing!

I can hardly wait to hear about the new discovery.

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 10:40AM
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Elly_NJ(NJ z6)

I am fascinated by the technology used to put Curiosity together; the hundreds (or thousands) of parts that seem to work so flawlessly. Its been such a short time in the history of mankind for the NASA scientists to be able to put this complex machine onto another plane, not only to take pictures, but to sniff the atmosphere, do an analyse of the rocks, and send the information back to earth. Amazing!

Agreed. But don't you think they could have found alternative sources of energy in that time? Right here on earth?

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 10:58AM
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jmc01

elly, you would not be sitting at a computer, posting on this site, if scientists from NASA hadn't been doing exploration of other types in years past. I'm with shymil and am anxious to hear about the discoveries.

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 11:57AM
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agnespuffin

Shhh, don't tell, but what happened is that everything stopped working, and no one wants to admit it.

I'll agree. Seems as if they could have found something better to use all that money for. But hey! It put a lot of people to work.

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 11:58AM
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nancy_in_venice_ca Sunset 24 z10

In the last 50 years we couldn't find alternative sustainable energy but we can send rovers to mars.

We have the resources to do both, but political will has been lacking for alternative sustainable energy. How that might be in light of campaign contributions, and a president and vice-president from the oil industry - well, we can connect the dots.

Drill, baby, drill!

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 12:09PM
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ohiomom

Exactly Nancy

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 12:17PM
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vgkg(Z-7)

Saturn's largest moon Titan has huge lakes of liquid hydrocarbons, watch out for the TransTitan Pipeline coming soon to a solar system near you....
...well...space tankers at best....or worst

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 5:01PM
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jodik_gw

The movie "Avatar" keeps running through my mind... I can only imagine that some folks would rather conquer and destroy in the name of wealth... than discover and learn...

Which thought, Ohiomom? The one regarding theologians? Or the one regarding Earth and the sad shape it's in? Or... maybe both? :-)

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 5:08PM
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pnbrown

VK, do you think Mars could also be experiencing global warming?

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 6:43PM
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don_socal

It will be interesting when we some how discover that there is energy in the space (not just air) around us emanating from our sun and all the stars that can be used to power our technology as it evolves. Clean and unlimited in the true sense of the word. That would end all the hubris about fossil fuels and destroying the environment.

Tesla was going in the right direction wanting to build giant coils to generate an unbroken cover of electricity to be free to all with the right receiving implements like fluorescent lights that just have to be in the vicinity. Fighting over what will be dead tech is anti-progressive when we should put more into research to free us of the burden of destroying to build in so many ways.

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 7:54PM
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ohiomom

Both Jodik :)

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 8:20PM
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elvis

"Jimmy Hoffa"

Some say he's buried around here, lots of gangster types used to come here due to the proximity to Chicago and the remote location. Dillinger's shoot out at Little Bohemia was here.

No Hoffa on Mars. I say candy bars.

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 8:20PM
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jodik_gw

Ah... I sorta thought so, Ohiomom. :-)

Personally, I think we're going to learn too much about our own planet through Mars exploration and testing. The unfortunate part will be that nothing much will change here, and this will one day be a dead planet, too.

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 9:49PM
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vgkg(Z-7)

"VK, do you think Mars could also be experiencing global warming?"

PN, you may recall a few years ago when swanz, maxter, and I danced around that question. I'm of the opinion that we haven't had enough time nor data to get a complete picture of Mars' long term climate change, if any. They argued that the sun is getting hotter so therefore Mars and all the planets are warming up, it was and still is a favorite GW debunking theme. It doesn't matter as CO2 build up in the Earth's atmosphere is the main influence locking in the heat. So even if the sun were warming up (ever so slightly over eons) it's not an either or situation as both would contribute to the warming. The recent decades of heating acceleration weighs heavily on mankind changing the chemistry of the atmosphere, not the sun...

...and it's getting dangerously close to this thread getting a number ;)

    Bookmark   November 24, 2012 at 10:03AM
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vgkg(Z-7)

...oh what the heck.....#92

Hey Zofie! come back! What do you think the rover found?

    Bookmark   November 24, 2012 at 10:18AM
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pnbrown

Oh, swanz and maxter, wherefore art thou(s)?

    Bookmark   November 24, 2012 at 10:37AM
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elvis

Jodi: "Personally, I think we're going to learn too much about our own planet through Mars exploration and testing."

I'm wondering how we can "learn too much". Like "hear no evil, see no evil..."?

    Bookmark   November 24, 2012 at 10:56AM
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zofie

vgkg, I hope they found signs of life in the soil. And maybe a bone or two. ;-)

    Bookmark   November 24, 2012 at 12:05PM
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jodik_gw

No, elvis... more like here we are, given a second chance, and we still haven't learned any valuable lessons. Like that.

    Bookmark   November 24, 2012 at 1:15PM
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david52_gw

It's a wrapper from a Snickers Bar, and they're looking for confirmation by spotting a Martian Mars Bar factory.

/the only possible explanation

    Bookmark   November 24, 2012 at 1:32PM
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marshallz10(z9-10 CA)

No, David, they discovered a Twinkees factory complex and so could allow the Hostess one to fail and sell off antiquated equipment and get rid of those pesky unions.

    Bookmark   November 24, 2012 at 10:00PM
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vgkg(Z-7)

Now that's Outsourcing!

    Bookmark   November 25, 2012 at 9:37AM
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elvis

Great; just great. NOW who do we blame?

    Bookmark   November 25, 2012 at 1:05PM
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jodik_gw

Whomever is at fault... isn't that the right way to assign it?

Though, instead of wasting time on that, shouldn't we be more concerned with the present state of our own planet?

    Bookmark   November 25, 2012 at 1:51PM
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marshallz10(z9-10 CA)

Too depressing

    Bookmark   November 25, 2012 at 2:14PM
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Circus Peanut

Personally, I hope they find Robert Heinlein living it up.

wherefore art thou(s)?

Ye, pnbrown -- plural of thou is "ye". :-)
Personal pronouns in Early Modern English

ÃÂ
Nominative
Oblique
Genitive
Possessive

1st person
singular
I, ich
me
my/mine
mine

plural
we
us
our
ours

2nd person
singular informal
thou
thee
thy/thine
thine

plural or formal singular
ye, you
you
your
yours

3rd person
singular
he/she/it
him/her/it
his/her/his (it)
his/hers/his

plural
they
them
their
theirs

    Bookmark   November 25, 2012 at 10:20PM
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nancy_in_venice_ca Sunset 24 z10

So what did they find on Mars?

Judge Crater!

I know; a pun is the lowest form of humour.

    Bookmark   November 25, 2012 at 11:53PM
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Elly_NJ(NJ z6)

This is most relevant, written by Carl Sagan:

"Look again at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there-on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known."
â Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space

    Bookmark   November 28, 2012 at 5:57AM
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steve2416

Elly, excellent post/quote.

    Bookmark   November 28, 2012 at 4:24PM
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demifloyd(8)

Elly--thanks for posting.

We are so insignificant, yet so unique and important.
Humans are the great cosmic contrariety.

My DH and I watched Carl Sagan's COSMOS series when we were dating and first married (several times)--he was a physicist.

I was so proud when I saved enough money to order the series on VHS tape and present to one Christmas!

Sagan was a great mind gone too soon.

    Bookmark   November 28, 2012 at 7:35PM
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elvis

The movie "Contact" based on Sagan's book is worth watching; another take on the existence of God.

    Bookmark   November 28, 2012 at 7:40PM
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vgkg(Z-7)

Whatever they found didn't warrant bragging rights yesterday. The "one for the record books" was suddenly back peddled into a "not so much" newz. Maybe releasing the rover's photos of that crashed alien spaceship was too much for the public to handle ;oP

    Bookmark   December 4, 2012 at 9:26AM
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M.compton

"Personally, I hope they find Robert Heinlein living it up.
wherefore art thou(s)?

Ye, pnbrown -- plural of thou is "ye". :-) "

And while you're at it "Wherefore" is incorrect as well.

    Bookmark   December 4, 2012 at 10:44AM
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Circus Peanut

Ha -true. "Wherefore art thou Romeo?" could be translated as "Why do you have to be, of all things, Romeo?" as Juliet wrestles with the vagaries of family feuds.

    Bookmark   December 4, 2012 at 1:13PM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

Bill O'Reilly, obviously.

    Bookmark   December 4, 2012 at 1:30PM
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heri_cles

Life as we know it is dependent on Earth's atmosphere, its minerals, water and oxygen. That begs the question as to why we are looking for life where those conditions do not exist. The best answer seems to be that we are simply on a scientific exploration to Mars which may yield clues as to the formation of the Universe, although even that does not sit well with Creationists who choose not to know.

    Bookmark   December 4, 2012 at 2:03PM
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Embothrium(USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA)

They choose to know the wrong information. More Americans now believe in angels than evolution. Wow!

    Bookmark   December 4, 2012 at 2:58PM
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mylab123(z5NW)

I read that too bboy - the superstitious business about the angels/evolution beliefs.

It sure does explain a *lot*, doesn't it.

    Bookmark   December 4, 2012 at 3:49PM
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rob333

Carbon? Does that mean they found diamonds?

    Bookmark   December 4, 2012 at 3:53PM
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vgkg(Z-7)

If life exists on Mars today it's most likely under the surface, perhaps in moist caves and/or under the icecaps. This particular Rover was designed to find signs of past life. To detect the chemical fingerprints of ancient microbes that may have existed during the very early wet Mars phase, around the same time that microbes first evolved in the Earth's young oceans 3-4 billion years ago. Even if today's Mars is completely dead just discovering that life got a foothold there but failed would be pretty darn interesting if not thought provoking. If NASA does eventually confirm past life from the surface soil tests then my bets are on some tough nut microbes still living there somewhere deep and wet.

    Bookmark   December 4, 2012 at 5:28PM
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don_socal

heri_cles, There is life at the sea floor where the vent tubes emit gasses that we could not live in at temperatures almost above boiling. Gives new thought to where and what life takes form as.

Here is a link that might be useful: Life in the Abyss

    Bookmark   December 4, 2012 at 6:37PM
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