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Grafting experiment

Posted by kodom087 9 (My Page) on
Thu, May 23, 13 at 13:05

When I was doing the repotting of my DRs in April I did some root pruning as well. I had cut off a couple of undesirable roots that were either in the way or eventually would not add to the over all appearance of my oldest DR. Rather than just throw away the decent sized roots I wanted to experiment with grafting. Unfortunately I didn't take any before and during pictures but here is the result of the experiment.

This root was at the very bottom of the DR growing between two other nice fat roots in a horizontal path. I was worried it'd grow in such a way to trap dirt and such that might could eventually lead to rot. Besides, it was underground so it wouldn't never really see the light of day. I did the flat (slightly angled) graft and then planted it vertically. I'll be curious how this root develops over the years.

I should add that the grafts were perfectly flat. While it was bonding the scion pushed down to form that weird gap. I'm guessing because of young tissue growing faster than old tissue of the root. But it's filling in fast as you can see by the last two closeup shots.

So if for some reason you have a need to prune off some big roots due to rot or what ever I suggest saving them cleaning of the rot and do a graft. What do you have to loose?

Kirk


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Grafting experiment

Wow....that is interesting experiment. Please keep up post from time to time.
Marie


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RE: Grafting experiment

Thanks, Marie.

I also did a micro graft of an albino seedling onto one of my regular pinks to try to keep from losing it. So far it's in the start of it's second week and seems to be ok. I'll be posting about that one too.

Kirk


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RE: Grafting experiment

Just a little update on the graft experiment.

Kirk


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RE: Grafting experiment

Krk,
Well done, surely this must be a first? Never heard of grafting directly onto a root before. When you think about it water and nutrients have a shorter journey to the graft. I think you are really onto something. Keep us updated.

Brian UK.


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RE: Grafting experiment

I never thought about that, Brian. Is food for thought! I figure the root will take years to look interesting although not concerned with the overall look of it. I plan on using this graft as scion stock in the future and not worry about taking scions from my original plant unless pruning.

Kirk


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RE: Grafting experiment

Kirk this is amazing thanks for sharing, maybe I will try to experiment with my seedlings


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RE: Grafting experiment

Very cool - thanks for the update... will think about doing some root pruning now....


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RE: Grafting experiment

Hi Kirk!!

This is just awesome!!

Congratulations on a job well done... Love the updates!!

Keep posting pics..

Take care,

Laura


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RE: Grafting experiment

Thanks! It has got me wanting to do a couple of more odd root grafts. I may do that later this week. Can't wait to see what you all come up with in your experiments.

Kirk


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RE: Grafting experiment

A little update on this graft experiment.

First, please ignore the spider mite damage. I have been away from home for a month. It seems the spider mites took over pretty much all my adeniums while I was away and the person left in charge to water my plants isn't exactly what any one would call a gardener. So I'll be working hard this week on damage control!

This is what I came home today to see on my grafting experiment. It's first buds. I don't have faith they'll make it through the spider mite treatment but one can only hope. Non the less, I'm excited.

Kirk


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RE: Grafting experiment

That is quite the experiment, Kirk. That is really something to see it forming buds.
Rick


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RE: Grafting experiment

Hey Kirk,

So glad to see you are back. I was wondering about where you had gone. I'm glad your graft is still doing well and producing flowers for you. That is wonderful.

I imagine if you use any chemicals you will lose leaves and the bud. Perhaps you want to just spray with a strong shower of water a couple times a day to get rid of them and still see your plant bloom? Then begin using the chemicals.

Glad you are back...Missed ya!


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RE: Grafting experiment

Kirk, very interesting experiment. I see the joint is getting stronger too. You think it can still support once the tree gets bigger?


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RE: Grafting experiment

Amazing experiment!! Well done! :-)

Chuy


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RE: Grafting experiment

Wow, that is fast. Your picture was on May 23 and now only mid August. Only 3 months to flowers.....very good experiment.

Marie


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RE: Grafting experiment

Thanks, everyone!

Otis, I think it'll be able to support it just fine. I do think the blooms may droop this first time being it's a young graft but I think by next year it'll handle them pretty well.

Kirk


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RE: Grafting experiment

Well, the bud fell off as did the leaves. Oh well. At least I should be able to expect some flowers in it's next cycle and hopefully be spiter mite free.

Kirk


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RE: Grafting experiment

Sorry to read about the spider mite attack. I hope your other plants weren't as attractive to the nasty critters. That is one very cool graft!

Cynthia


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RE: Grafting experiment

Updating this thread.

Since most of my plants are starting to wake up I decided to show the progress of this graft experiment. Remember how this was a completely underground root that I cut off and decided to graft onto just to see if it'd work? Well just check out how that graft area has been changing over the winter during dormancy.
The part of the root that has been exposed to light and air since the graft is getting some green and the scar at the scion is filling in very nicely. I'd say this cutie is coming along nicely!

Kirk


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