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Light and Leaves

Posted by lucky123 none (My Page) on
Thu, Apr 24, 14 at 17:29

I set up a leaf nursery. I took two leaves off existing plants, put them in plastic, watered very sparingly and now the leaves are still looking good. Not long enough for plantlets but it looks promising.
The question is, what about light? I am treating these leafs like I would treat seeds, just with drier soil as I have had problems with leaf rot when I tried this before.
Are they similar in culture to seedlings?
I have any degree of light and right now they are in bright light out of direct sunlight but should I keep them in bright shade or dark shade
The choices being *a few hours of direct sun Or *bright light with no direct sun (just outside direct sun) Or *bright shade (in the bathroom with small window) Or *dark shade (down behind the wood stove)??
At least no rot so far and just a hint of condensation inside the sealed bags, usually early in the morning.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Light and Leaves

Bright light. Anything green and above soil level must have lots of bright, indirect light.


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RE: Light and Leaves

Everything says "bright indirect light" but they don't need as much as a blooming plant. Your "bright shade" and my "bright shade" might differ too. No sun though! (It's possible that bathroom window might be fine at least until you see mouse ears.)

Diana


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RE: Light and Leaves

All right
I put them back just a touch. I have them where I would put very tiny seedlings, just enough light without any heat or glare. I will watch closely for any reaction.
Also, I saw a video and the guy from Lyon Greenhouse seemed to say to bury, not just the stem but also the leaf blade 10-30%. I may have misunderstood because most videos show just the very bottom of the leaf touching the soil.

How deep do you plant the stem/ leaves? Is angle important?

I suppose the leafs should be facing the brightest source of the light in the pots, not turned around or broadside to the source. It wouldn't matter with overheads but I have windows so I wondered about that also

Rot has always been the downfall of my leafing but maybe this time I have that controlled.
So far, so good!


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RE: Light and Leaves

There is a lot of good info on the Forum on propagating leaves. Some helpful people have posted photos regularly. To read through these, you can do a Search using key words such as, Propagating Leaves, or, Propagating AV leaves, or, Rooting Leaves. It
takes a while to see results. Anywhere from a few weeks to many months, depending on the leaf.

This post was edited by fortyseven on Sun, Apr 27, 14 at 0:26


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RE: Light and Leaves

Yes, it is hard, when the response is so long in the making to know if it is done right.
I suppose as long as the leaf doesn't rot or decay, then it is planted and lighted and watered correctly.
But can't count the harvest while plowing the field.

This post was edited by lucky123 on Thu, Apr 24, 14 at 20:10


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RE: Light and Leaves

There are various ways of setting leaves. I think you may have misunderstood something on the Lyons one though. I didn't see it.

If you are leaving a stem, which I do unless it's not possible, it should be around 1-1/2" or so. It's not rocket science. I have one rooting that is probably 1/8" and I'm sure some have been longer and in between. If you bury them too deep, the babies have to come all the way to the top so try to set them just a little ways in - not to the bottom of the pot.

Some do bury and have the leaf touching the mix. I assume they have a rather short stem. I've done it but I think I was just tired.

You can set a leaf tip or top which is a bit different but there is no stem in that case.

Cut the end at a 45 deg. angle and just insert it so it stays in the pot. There are photos of this many places. Sometimes you have the babies come up behind so I figure I did something weird but not often.

Good luck.

Diana


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RE: Light and Leaves

The FAQ section of this forum was written by members and has many tips on various topics.


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RE: Light and Leaves

Luck,

I do not bury the leaf base although some do. I have found it to be an invitation to rot in my conditions. Since you have had problems with this in the past, I would not plant too deep.

The angle of the leaf in the cup is not an issue but I tilt mine back a bit so the babies grow in front of the leaf. Cutting the stem on an angle exposes more tissue for the development of babies. Cutting the short part of the angle towards the front of the leaf allows the babies to come from the front, as well.

My leaves are in the same light as the rest of my plants.

As Diane says, don't over think this. Sometimes, when I break a leaf off by accident, I stick it in some water and forget about it. Weeks later, there's the babies!

Linda


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RE: Light and Leaves

Good Advice All
"Don't overthink this " That is the best advice

Not much thinking but I keep having this urge to dig them up and see if they have roots yet.

Maybe I should stick some in water just to see how the whole thing works.


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RE: Light and Leaves

I am way older than you are and I do dig them up to see if they have roots. I don't necessarily recommend it. If you must, try to wait about 3 or 4 weeks and do it very gently. And rebury them gently too.

But - I try not to do it too often. I also use vermiculite/perlite so they come up and go back in fairly easily, although that's still no excuse.

Diana


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RE: Light and Leaves

Lucky,

You have a good idea-put a leaf or two in water and watch the process. Although propagating leaves in water has gone out of favor a bit, it is still a fascinating way to watch the plants develop.

Linda


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RE: Light and Leaves

There is info on this forum on hydroponics. The process of forming roots is often very slow. The roots are tiny. If you want to experiment, you can remove a few leaves and experiment with different methods.
. The roots grow from the bottom of the stem

This post was edited by fortyseven on Thu, May 1, 14 at 1:42


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RE: Light and Leaves

Linda
I saw mention of a piece of saran wrap over a shot glass. Poke the stem through the plastic. It didn't say whether the shot glass had water or soil or whether the leaf was covered above the shot glass.
Joanne:
I have done everything any amateur can do to kill that Cora (?) and it answers me with yet another bloom
Diana
Do you use vermiculite/perlite alone, no other mix? I am thinking about rooting in sand and potting in some mixture of well rotted manure and garden loam. But I am not quite that crazy yet.
.


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RE: Light and Leaves

Yes, I use vermiculite/perlite alone. It's a fairly standard method.

Diana


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RE: Light and Leaves

Lucky,

The saran wrap refers to growing in water. It helps to keep the leaf suspended. In soil, you don't need a support as the leaf supports itself.

Linda


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RE: Light and Leaves

aviolet6 is sending a few leaves with the fiery sunset crown.
Now I will have more leaves to practice with so I am setting up a covered plastic cup arrangement, mixing up perlite/vermiculite.
I think I have been burying the leaves too deep and using too heavy a mix. I am being more careful and I don't see any rot at all (yet)
I hope this all works.
I really like healthy plants. I don't much care about bloom I just like a big green furry plants.. Flowers are extra


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RE: Light and Leaves

Lucky,

I use the same mix that I grow my plants in. One-third each of perlite, vermiculite and peat. I have used plain perlite in the past as well as a perlite and vermiculite mix. They all work just fine.

Linda


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RE: Light and Leaves

Hmmmm
I noticed one interesting thing.
The Temperature is going to be in the 40's at night all week.
I will have to bottom heat the trays with heating pads, like seedlings and cover the entire thing at night to keep it warm.
The leaves need 60 degrees to root or they root faster at that temperature.
Night temp's in 40's is a recipe for rot in any potted plant especially with high humidity environment.
A cool, dry environment is a balancing act between too dry/low humidity and the moist/cool conditions that favor ~rot~
I Hate Rot!
I forget it is still early spring. Next month the temperatures are mild day and night. The cooler is turned on, which raises the humidity. It is just March/April that are the problem months. The heat is turned off and the cooler hasn't been turned on.
Spring is almost Here

This post was edited by lucky123 on Sat, Apr 26, 14 at 22:05


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