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Monkey Tree?

Posted by TweetyPye z8/SC Al. (My Page) on
Wed, Jun 15, 05 at 12:20

OK, folks, has anyone out there ever heard of a Monkey Tree? This tree is very tall with no limbs until the very top. It has huge, lobed leaves, and the tree trunk is very straight and the same size from top to bottom. It has a very smooth, gray bark. My daughter and I call them "Elephant leg trees"! There are several of these trees in the garden surrounding a house my daughter recently purchased. Someone told us they were Monkey trees, but I can't find anything like it on the net. Any ideas? I will post a photo when I can remember to make one. :)


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Monkey Tree?

Monkeypuzzle tree, Araucaria araucana, on HortiPlex.

Here is a link that might be useful: Google


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RE: Monkey Tree?

Well, the description sure doesn't fit the Monkey Puzzle tree, which has anything but huge lobed leaves and very smooth bark. I'm also going to take a wild guess: what about a banana tree? Or one of the palms?

If not, can you attach an image or try to describe the leaves more fully? We all love to be detectives.


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RE: Monkey Tree?

I too could not think of anything but a monkey puzzle tree - and didn't think the description matched either. However, I would LOVE to have a monkey puzzle tree - my aunt has one in her yard in GA - anyone know of a place i can buy one?


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RE: Monkey Tree?

How about trying the Chinese Parasol Tree. Tony


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RE: Monkey Tree?

Wow, I knew someone out there would know what we have! Thanks Tony, you hit it right on the head with the Chinese Parasol Tree. I researched and found great photos online of this tree. It is a pretty unusual looking tree, but it has one big drawback that I can see. SEEDLINGS, everywhere, so I don't believe I'll be transplanting any of them to my garden! Thanks to you all for the follow ups.

Tweety~Pye


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RE: Monkey Tree?

Rosey, your aunt in Georgia may have a China Fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata), which is often called Monkey Puzzle in the South. The true Monkey Puzzle trees don't thrive in our climate, although I know some people do try to grow them!

If you can find one, there is a blue form of the China Fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata 'Glauca') which is really nice... a great substitute for Colorado Blue Spruce in our part of the country.


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RE: Monkey Tree?

Thanks Dave - I think you must be right - i did a search with that term and it does look like the same tree. Very Pretty - i might have to look into it one of these days! It will have to wait a little while though - my DH says i can't handle what i have & to not buy anymore - and he is actually right....if only i could win the lottery and retire....


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RE: Monkey Tree?

ok i saw a small tree and i cant remember exactly but it had a small trunk with big leaves it was inside plant with the bamboo would anyone on her know what it was called? i was at lowes in the area with bamboo any ideas? i think it sold for $11.97? can remember numbers not words.


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