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asian sweet potato recipes

Posted by chesnok z6 AR (My Page) on
Wed, Aug 24, 05 at 16:46

here in the US sweet potatoes are almost always eaten same way--w/ butter and sugar. i'm looking for other ways to eat them. sweet potato is a major crop in east asia, what are some ways to eat it? i know they're often eaten in china just roasted. i'd especially like to hear of ways to eat them that are savory instead of sweet.


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RE: asian sweet potato recipes

I don't HAVE any recipes per se, I just make them up as I go along. So here are a few I like. A potato peeler is handy to get them ready for some of these.
Peel and grate sweet potato, and stirfry in butter.
OR fry up some sausage with lots of garlic and black papper, then stir in leftover baked sweet potatoes.
Or make a curry, these are some general recipes I used this summer with what I had on hand:
Fry whole cumin, coriander, and fennel seeds in oil for 1 min. You can skip this part just add the powdered herbs along with curry pdr now and fry for 1 min more. Add some water to keep from burning, or if you have the veggies handy, throw them in now and stir fry a bit before adding the water. This summer I used cubed sweet potatoes, chopped amaranth (redroot pigweed to be specific), lots of garlic, maybe some onions. I served them with idlis, an easy fermented "bread" of lentils and rice flour. I have gluten intolerance, so this is very nice for me.
This time of year I do lots of curries. Again fry up your spices, I like LOTS of curry, cumin, coriander, fennel seed. When I use bitter melon, I like to add anise seed and plenty of sweet veggies. For a good curry you must have the 4 flavors they taught you about in school, sweet, sour, salty, bitter (usually the curry pdr, the turmeric esp, provide the bitter) and the 5th flavor felt all over the mouth: pain, I mean heat. In addition, a curry requires something stodgy to sort of "Hold it down" The last of your greenshell beans or peas are good for this, also meat. You can of course serve it with rice or chapatis or idlis. Garden veggies suitable for curries include nearly everything. I have used: okra, green or greenshell beans, onions, peppers and hot peppers, potatoes, tomatoes, apples, pears, tomatillos, squash, sweet potatoes, carrots. Just remember it needs lots of ingredients, an absolute minimum of 3, and it needs to be sweet and hot and tart and bitter all at once. Easy to get addicted. And those are only Indian type curries. I also got into making Thai curries, with ginger, lime, and fishy sauces, but haven't done that in a while, so can't reel any off the top of my head. Donna


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RE: asian sweet potato recipes

  • Posted by chaman U S east coast (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 12, 05 at 22:10

Donna_in_TN,
You have excellent knowledge about curry preparations.I would suggest one more ingredient and that is "Drumsticks", more than foot long thick bean like fruits and the leaves of Moringa Oleifera.This will add crispy mildly bitter appetizing taste.You can buy them fresh or canned from Indian grocery stores.


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RE: asian sweet potato recipes

Sweet potatoes are sliced into 1/2 inches and fryed in brown sugar. Then the sweet potatoes are skewered into bbq sticks and sold as kamote Q (sweet potato bbq). Another way is to slice the sweet potatoes in sticks like french fries and fried as well in brown sugar. When cooked the sugar will give the sweet potatoes a crispy coating. I also like the saba bananas done the same way. Very yummy. You have to keep turning the sweet potatoes or saba bananas because the brown sugar will stick to the bottom and burn.

Or sweet potatoes tempura style. Or tepan style. Both yummy as well.

Oh yes another all time favorite classic here, cubed sweet potatoes and bean sprouts (Optional, shredded carrots for colour, ground pork or beef, slice green beans, etc) are half cooked first then wrapped in spring roll wrappers. Not the tiny wrappers but the dinner plate size ones. Dipping sauce is whatever you like. We like vinegar, garlic, onions, chilies, salt and pepper some add sugar. Or sweet sauce.


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RE: asian sweet potato recipes

  • Posted by Honu z11 HI (My Page) on
    Mon, Oct 10, 05 at 17:05

mysweetie, your last recipe w/ the dipping sauce sounds especially yummy!
I like cubed steamed purple (Okinawan) sweet potato in warm tapioca pudding w/ coconut milk.
Or mashed purple sweet potato in the middle of mochi (w/ sweetened adzuki beans) or inside baked (bread-type) manapua.
Or simply steamed and cubed purple potato tossed with dressing made from mac nuts, lemon grass, ginger, onion, lime, honey, soy sauce, and rice wine vinegar, then tossed with baby greens.


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RE: asian sweet potato recipes

Hahaha... your recipe with the coconut milk is called Ginatan here. We add Sweet potatoes, purple ube, taro, mochi, tapioca pearls, saba bananas, jackfruit. Sounds good yeah?!


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RE: asian sweet potato recipes

  • Posted by Honu z11 HI (My Page) on
    Wed, Oct 12, 05 at 1:08

mysweetie, sounds delicious!


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RE: asian sweet potato recipes

mysweetie, I just had ginataan the other day. My lolo made some and he didn't even know what it was called!? I don't know how that happened, lol.

This is my second year growing the Japanese variety. I let it completely cover the garden after the heat kills off all the other plants because it keeps down the weeds. So now I have so many I don't know what to do with them. We fried some but didn't skewer them. I like them with both salt and sugar at the same time.


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RE: asian sweet potato recipes

Japanese type meaning the yellow type? Have you tried the mashed sweet potatoes with chestnuts?

Your lolo is funny... LOL

You should try growing tapioca. Or kamoteng kahoy. I recommend the yellow glutinous type. When cooked (as in boiled) it looks like its been toped with melted butter. You can then add salt or sugar. Or add it to ginatan as well.


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RE: asian sweet potato recipes

No, it's a variety that's purple/maroon on the outside and white on the inside. I don't know if it's really Japanese, I was just told that. I think I liket the firm, potato-like varieties better than the wet orange kind that is baked into pies and stuff.

I have tried growing tapioca. I sprouted a stem clipping last year but the little root it produced never sprouted in the spring. I guess all of the buds died or something. Can you sprout the ones bought at the market?

I have never seen the yellow variety. We usually buy it pre-grated in frozen packets.


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RE: asian sweet potato recipes

Reddish/maroon skin and whitish on the inside sounds like the Japanese type.

Tapioca or cassava is the same thing. All i know is the stem is use to gtow new cassava. You have to have prefect timing to harvest cassava, too early and the cassava will be too skinny, too late and it will be impossible to eat, because it will be too fiberous, bitter, etc. The ordinary type is the plain white. The extraordinary is the yellow glutious type. I wish i could send you some cuttings of the yellow cassava. Just one stem is good for 3 or 4 cassava plants. I have read about seeds but i've never seen the seeds. And my mother says you have to plant the cutting slant ways.


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RE: asian sweet potato recipes

Hmmmm, maybe I'll find some when I go to the PI this January. Although I don't know how strict customs is going back. I guess that's why you couldn't send them, because of the whole plant material thing. Or just 'cause they'll perish in shipping.


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RE: asian sweet potato recipes

For those who grow their own sweet potatoes, the leaves are very good eating, too.
Anakaleki
US has very strong restrictions on items coming in from the Philippines.
This thread has a lot of good information! Now I am hungry!


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