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ID this common, pale-pink/peach rhodie?

Posted by girlndocs 8 WA (My Page) on
Sun, Apr 15, 07 at 23:46

I see it often, actually, in commercial andscaping where it is often quite small (4' or so) but there are also larger, I presume older specimens around some of the houses in town and also it's at the Seattle Japanese Garden at the Arboretum. It's in the middle of its bloom now.

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I upped the fill light slightly on this pic

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But not on this one. Both pics are of the same plant around dusk.

Thanks!

Kristin


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RE: ID this common, pale-pink/peach rhodie?

  • Posted by bboy z8 WA USA (My Page) on
    Tue, Apr 17, 07 at 0:12

'Unique'. Formerly a standard item, since foliage mildew became widespread here it has become a stinker. I had one over 40 years old eaten up by it. In fact, I am now wary of rhododendrons generally and seldom plant them anymore, because of this problem. Susceptible varieties must be kept sprayed to remain acceptable, most susceptible must be kept sprayed to remain alive. It causes the leaves to drop prematurely, like blackspot of roses. Not a good thing for the continued vitality of a slow-growing evergreen shrub that often has only one flush of growth per year.


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RE: ID this common, pale-pink/peach rhodie?

Yup, that looks like it's the one.

But if it's such a problem variety now, why am I seeing it planted in new landscapes?

And also, these rhodies tend to catch my eye (because of how much I like the bloom color) and I can't say as I've ever noticed any damaged leaves or scraggly look. Maybe it's not "Unique" after all but something similar?

Kristin


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Common, pale-pink/peach rhodie?

  • Posted by bboy z8 WA USA (My Page) on
    Tue, Apr 17, 07 at 0:42

New specimens coming from nurseries will have been sprayed in the nursery in many, if not most instances. The mildew can take some years to diminish the plant to the point where it begins to appear seriously gaunt. And possibly not all sites will have it, although it seems to be pretty prevalent by now.

For years many thought the lingering sparseness of their rhododendrons was due to the severe 1990 winter. Infested plants have a dusty mold (mildew) on the leaf undersides, with corresponding bleached looking areas on top.


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