Return to the Botany Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Micropropagation, or just a tiny cutting..

Posted by albert_135 Sunset 2 or 3 (My Page) on
Fri, Nov 17, 06 at 13:29

A definition question: at what point does a tiny cutting become micropropagation?

Some science dictionaries just say micropropagation is 'tissue culture'.


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Micropropagation, or just a tiny cutting..

You could (if you really wanted to) call the propagules 'tiny cuttings'. Micropropagation involves a few cells of the 'mother plant', propagated in vitro, usually in sterile nutrient rich agar. This is tissue culture.


 o
RE: Micropropagation, or just a tiny cutting..

I would say that one considers it 'Tissue Culture' or Micropropagation if the tissue explant in question is reduced to an undifferentiated state from which the propagules are recovered by a redifferentiation. This is generally done by reversion of a bit of meristem tissue to a callus state which will grow as such and be divided, but can be carried to extremes as in growth from cultures of suspended single cells which has been done for tobacco and carrots among others.

George


 o
RE: Micropropagation, or just a tiny cutting..

Micropropagation is a subset of tissue culture. The process takes place in a sterile in vitro envirnment on a nutrient media that may or may not have a solidifying agent and typically contains a plant growth regulators to help differentiate shoot and or root differentiation.

There are two basic types of micropropagation, somalclonal and mericlonal. Somaclonal is considered to be far inferior to mericlonal MP in regards to commercial production. Somaclonal MP involves taking any plant tissue (leaf, stem, invitro germinated seedling, flower petal, fruit etc.) using PGR concentration and ratio to form an undifferintiated callus culture and then changin the PGR ratio and concentration to form shoots. And then rooting the shoots.

Mericlonal MP skips the callus phase and uses a plant meristem (terminal or axillary) to start an a shoot culture. The shoot culture is either proliferated or rooted.

Mericlonal is considered supperior becuase a callus phase can lead to somalclonal mutations. Which is a bad thing if you are propagating a cultivar and fidelity is important.


 o
RE: Micropropagation, or just a tiny cutting..

Many decades ago in a university lab we did what geoforce described as "the tissue explant in question is reduced to an undifferentiated state from which the propagules are recovered by a redifferentiation. That lab was called "in vitro propagation" or sometimes "tissue culture". Am I correct in assuming that "micropropagation" is more recent jargon?


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Botany Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here