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earliest blooming plant

Posted by JessicaBe 5-6 Central Ohio (My Page) on
Thu, Apr 11, 13 at 16:34

Hello since this is the butterfly forum I was wondering if any of you can tell me what butterfly loving plant blooms early, I live in central Ohio z5/6. I know there are a lot of summer blooming but I want plants that butterflies can feed all through the year (except winter) spring, summer and fall. I have plants picked out for summer and fall but there are few that I found that is spring blooming.

Thanks!
Jessica


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: earliest blooming plant

Lilacs and don't laugh, you know those dandelions in your lawn?


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RE: earliest blooming plant

Lol then I will leave those be for the moment :-)


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RE: earliest blooming plant

Is violets another early bloomer that butterflies like?


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RE: earliest blooming plant

Yes, some of the smaller ones will nectar on it, and Fritillaries use it as a host plant.


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RE: earliest blooming plant

Thank you :-)


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RE: earliest blooming plant

Wild blueberries/Vaccinum eliotti are the type we have here, and they bloom in January. I've seen butterflies using them, also my cultivated blueberries bloom early, and I've seen both butterflies and hummingbirds using them.

Sherry


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RE: earliest blooming plant

Virginia Bluebells will attract both as well.


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RE: earliest blooming plant

The best early butterfly magnet I've ever seen in Ohio is hoary puccoon. Butterflies were all over them. OTOH, I've had zero luck trying to grow them.

KC


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RE: earliest blooming plant

I just googled hoary puccoon and found that, despite many years of research, no one has found a reliable method of propagating these plants. They have a very deep tap root, so can't be transplanted, and only rarely produce viable seed. So, I'd keep looking.

Martha


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RE: earliest blooming plant

I notice in my region that a lot of early butterflies, such as Mourning Cloaks , Commas and Red Admirals, go more for running sap, puddles etc more so than flowers. A muddy area in the garden or an overripe banana or mango go a long way...
Also don't forget those ELFs, whose host plants come up and out first, such as Pussytoes, False or Stinging Nettle (latter less attractive to varmints) and Everlasting.
Also, some parsley and/or fennel for that first wave of Black Swallowtails.


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RE: earliest blooming plant

Martha,
I did not know that info about hoary puccoon. I twice bought pieces of their roots from somebody. He said all I had to do was bury them and I would be in business. Did not work out either time.

KC


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RE: earliest blooming plant

Hi KC;
We collected Hoary Puccoon seed last year and am waiting to see how well it does. Our research showed that it is a parasitic plant and needs to be grown from seed with grasses. I will let you know how it goes.
Elisabeth


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RE: earliest blooming plant

Chives and alliums are good ones too. Another vote for dandelions, cinqufoils, creeping charlie! :)


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