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jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Posted by kashu z6 NJ (My Page) on
Tue, Jun 30, 09 at 12:46

For about 3 months I have been trying to root some jade cuttings in the gritty mix but keep getting mold at the cut end. I have 5 cuttings ranging from 2 1/2" to 6" tall with stems no wider than a 1/4". The cuttings were set out to dry for about 2 to 3 weeks then potted in the gritty mix in a clean clay pot. It sits in a bright covered balcony where it never gets rained on. My mix consists of equal parts sifted Aquatic Plant Soil, rinsed Gran-i-Grit grower size, and Repti Bark brand fir bark. When I plant cuttings, I do not water till I see roots. But whenever I check the stems for roots (about 2 weeks after potting), I always see grey fuzzy mold so I start the rooting process over again, cutting off moldy stem, drying and potting. I have done this 3 times and am afraid the cuttings are losing too much moisture and will never root. Is it possible that my mix is contaminated in some way? Can the mix be too wet just from the rinsed grit? I have never had anything get moldy on me before. And before I knew about the gritty mix, I always used MG houseplant soil and was fairly successful at rooting jades using the same method.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Yeah, something doesn't seem right. Your methods sound good to me, even rinsing the Gran-i-grow shouldn't be causing trouble if that is the only water they get.

Do you keep the cuttings in a propagator or some other high-humidity environment? Do the cutting receive any kind of air circulation? Those might be two things to consider. Both high humidity and stagnant air encourage the growth of mold.

As to solutions, try a different organic component and see if that does the trick (like using the MG stuff instead of the aquatic soil). It is certainly possible the aquatic soil really is tainted. You could also try applying cinnamon to a freshly cut section of Jade as a natural fungicide. Likewise, and rooting hormone with a fungicide might help.


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

The clay planter is outside on a windy balcony so I don't think air circulation/humidity is a problem.

The only organic component of the mix is the fir bark. The aquatic plant soil is just like turface. There is no actual soil in the mix.

Is it only the organic component that can be contaminated? Or is it possible that I have a bad batch of grit or turface? Also, would rinsing the gritty mix in a weak peroxide solution do any good?


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

The reality is that *everything* is contaminated with fungus spores, so it is more a question of degree. I could imagine the organic stuff actually having *established* fungus though, which is more what I meant by tainted. It really seems like a long shot, but why don't you try again but with no fir bark and see if that is the problem.

Again, it seems very unlikely, but could the Jade itself be the source of the fungus? Have you or anyone else been able to root some cuttings from the same mother plant without the mold showing up? Is there mold growing in/on the soil of the mother plant?

Hydrogen peroxide is an effective fungicide, and may help. However, the particular materials you use in your soil mix are all very, very porous, which gives the fungus/spores plenty of places to hide, thwarting your attempts to sanitize the soil.

Finally, is the mold killing the cuttings? Are they desiccating, or rotting?


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

No, the cuttings are not rotting. It looks like the mold forms over the calloused part of the stem and whenever I cut that part away, the inside of the stem looks perfectly fine.

I have never rooted cuttings from this particular jade. But the mother plant is very healthy and has never had any issues. Maybe it's a latent fungal problem??

Once the cuttings callous, I will pot without the bark and see what happens. I was going to repot the mother plant into the same gritty mix but I guess it's best to wait and see what happens to the cuttings this time around. Thanks for your help.


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Try the cinnamon too. I sometimes used to get mold on very large jade cuttings (3" diameter) while it was callousing. Ever since I started using cinnamon, it hasn't been a problem.


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

I'll dust them with cinnamon tonight. Thanks joscience!


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

I agree with Jo's advice!
(And might I add, you can always wash the cutting with a bit of dish soap).
Trim away the molded portion, dust with cinnamon, and let dry; then, try rooting in a
completely inorganic mixture. I use a lot of perlite, personally. Bark, pumice,
and quartz gravel are my other main ingredients - for both rooting and growing.

Jo sent me a nice Jade cutting, which developed a mold while waiting to be potted.
So I removed the molded section, dusted with cinnamon, and potted into a completely dry
mix.

How about some pics? ;)

Josh

mold
clean cut
potted


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Have you tried to just let some go and see if they turn out okay? Not all fungi are necessarily bad or would kill your cuttings.


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

The stems have been dusted with cinnamon and in about a week or two will be potted in a mixture of turface and grit. There was one shorter stem that was so dehydrated, I just tossed that one away.

wallydraigle - I was under the impression that mold would lead to rotting, mushy stems so I kept cutting it off. But if I get mold this time around I'll leave it and see what happens.

rooting jade


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

try steralising it a 195degrees celcias for 30 min to kill mold spores


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

I have rooted some Jade plants from a cutting that was about 1 inch tall and then one that was just a leaf. They are in a 4 inch plastic pot. I used just plain old potting soil for they seem to like what they are in, so I am not going to repot until I have to. Good luck, I think mine was just by chance. I'd attatch pics, but I don't know how, lol.


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

If I had cuttings like that, I'd plant them in a damp soil/perlite blend and they'd usually take off. I had a large jade die a few years ago and had to repot many cuttings of similar size to yours. I let them dry a bit but didn't go crazy with letting them callous a lot. I just stuck them in slightly damp soil and let them root on their own. The cuttings in the mix with the most perlite almost always did the best.


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

It's the fir bark. Have you ever noticed that nothing grows under a fir tree? It's because fir trees have something that inhibits root growth.


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

I've never heard of fir bark being a problem. It's frequently used to grow orchids as well as other plants. I grow all of my plants in a soil mix that is 1/3 fir bark and they grow just fine. Several of them had roots growing out of the drainage holes within 2-3 months of being potted. I've also rooted cuttings in this mix.

If I were having this mold problem, I'd probably make fresh cuts, spray the cuttings thoroughly with rubbing alcohol, then dust cuts in cinnamon, and leave in a dry environment until well calloused. Maybe 2-3 weeks wasn't quite enough time for the cuts to completely heal? Hopefully you've got it licked this time.


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

I would never start cutting in moist soil, that is just looking for rot. Jade cuttings as well as most other cacti and succulents need to callose over and the wound to heal. Cinnamon works wonders!
It can take a long time for roots to develope so patience is a must.

RR


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

I'm sure the humidity is probably less where you are but, I just lay jade cuttings on sand, maybe add a little peat here and there, then mist. Down here I mist once a day for leaf cuttings and maybe twice for stems. I have also put the stems in a dry gritty mix that only gets wet when I mist. I have not had one stem rot. Almost all of the leaves produce new plants within a month or so of laying them on the sand. I found this technique from the mother plant herself. She dropped some leaves on the lanai floor and instead of dying, they started rooting. Quite miraculous, to learn from a plant. Hope some of this rambling makes sense.
Good luck
Shannon


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Update on rooting jades:

On Monday, July 13, I decided to pot up the stems. It was 12 days since I cut off the moldy stem tips which were then dusted with cinnamon. Our weather has been sunny, warm and breezy with low humidity and the cuts dried up nicely.

Since I had four similar stems to root and four identical clay pots, I decided to do an informal experiment using different potting media. Each jade stem got a different mix as follows:

1. Al's gritty mix of equal parts turface/grit/bark - completely dry.
2. Same gritty mix as #1 but with rinsed grit.
3. A gritty mix of turface and rinsed grit.
4. Moistened MG potting soil. (This has been my method for years b/f reading about the benefits of the gritty mix. I've rooted a few dozen succulent cuttings and have had close to 95% success rate rooting this way.)

So today I checked up on the stems. It had been only 3 days since I potted them up so I knew it'd be too early for roots to have formed but I was curious to see whether any would have mold. Well, it turns out mix 2 and 3 which both had the rinsed grit had fungal issues. They had greyish fuzzy mold at the cut end. On the other hand, the stem in the dry gritty mix and the one in the damp potting soil were fine, no roots, but no mold either.

I am certain that the damp potting soil is holding more moisture than the two mixes with rinsed grit yet there is no mold on the potting soil stem. Any thoughts? I really want to love the gritty mix as much as everyone else but I am perplexed.


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

I hope don't step on any one's feet here, but may I join in? I would suggest starting the cutting in cool weather, in pure pumice until they get roots, that is their growing time. Or cut them now and start them on a tray set in the shade until you see roots, then set them in soil, or just toss some leaves in a pot provided that you remove them properly, leave them on top of the soil face down. If you live in the east. They may be difficult to grow, do not give them any Peat Moss in the soil, and gritty soil must be able to get air into it as well, It must breath, toss in some small rocks to leave air pockets. I am going to repeat this again for the newcomers to this forum, they come from Africa and grow on rocky hill sides between the rocks, and still like those conditions, like to be crowed as it they were growing in rocks, (tiny pots) to start and gradually potted up each year or as needed. I think Pirate Girl has the hang of this.


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RE: More suggestions

Your problem is that you live in New Jersey, and if you are using fir bark that is another problem. No fir bark in
Africa it likes coarse soil that breaths, it does not like water until after it has roots. It likes a small pot, likes to be crowded, they like cool weather and not humid weather. They can live on just fog. Your cuttings look just great, wait until they have roots then put in a small pot using dry mix, then water, make sure they are getting air circulation even if youu need to use a fan.
Pirate Girl please help her out on this I know you can, you live in the east thanks, my friend. Norma


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Living in NJ might mean that there are things to consider - like hot muggy summer nights and cold winters...but I live right next door and I can grow just about anything well. In fact I dare say I can grow things better than many folks in SoCal. I know my only limitation is a shorter growing season so while I may not get the same amount of growth per year, I certainly get the same quality of growth. And of course I have no room for a 20 ft tall Aloe dichotoma in a pot :-)

You just need to realize what the limitations are, how to deal with them, and do you have the resources to deal with a large collection during the winter. I feel I have mastered all 3 things. Come to my house and see my blooming Pachy lamerei, Aloes, Cyphostemma, Cotyledons, Cycads and dozens of other plants in the ground and you will think you are in San Diego county.

Anyway, I digress...

Norma is right - Jades and many other South African plants prefer the shorter days and cooler spring and fall weather for active growth. Your cuttings will prove quicker and much more successful if you wait until September.

Try a small pot full of nothing but perlite. A clay pot is nice because it has weight. Just leave the pot outside. Let it receive rain and fresh air, and ignore it unless there is a heat wave. That should be adequate. After roots form, you can repot into Al's mix or any similar concoction.

x, the non-conformist


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Thanks to everyone for your comments and suggestions. I really appreciate everyone trying to help me with my dilema. But with the feedback that I'm getting, I think that perhaps I'm asking the wrong questions.

Just to be clear, I know how to root and grow jade plants. I'm by no means an expert, but I understand the conditions of their native environment and what it takes to grow them as houseplants. Crassulas are not difficult for me to grow, been doing it for years and have cut, rooted and given away many little pots of jades.

My problem started when I tried to root cuttings in Al's gritty mix that people have been raving about. Norma, this is a coarse mix that allows plenty of air circulation and bark makes up 1/3 of it. And Xerophyte, I started this whole process back in April when it was cooler.

I think my question is more about this mix and what I might be doing wrong with it and not so much about this plant. Maybe I'm in the wrong forum. Thanks again everyone.


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Kashu,
you've done well, and I appreciate the results of your experiment.
Obviously the dry grit gives good results.
The rinsed grit probably afforded *just enough* moisture/oxygen for mold to grow.
The wet potting mix probably has *too much* moisture for the mold to grow. Just some informal
thoughts on the subject.

Josh


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

I believe I was misunderstood a bit earlier. When I mist, I mist the soil/sand just a bit around the edges of the cuttings. Definitely not on the cuttings themselves. The sand dries very quickly as does the DRY gritty mix. It seems to keep the babies searching for more, which in turn, I believe, helps produce roots without rotting. Josh's experiment seems quite interesting. Not real sure but maybe the potting mix has some kind of antifungal agent?? Also they do seem to root slower as the temps rise but I still think these plants are magic =D
Shannon


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

I don't quite seem to understand the purpose of forums, people ask for help and when people bust there buns trying to help they are insulted because they are not getting the response they want. So many tried to help, and you just got mad. I have no idea how experiened you are. Most people are not when coming to this forum and asking for help, none of us know every thing we were only trying to help you and others who read these responses. I am very sorry, Crasulady2


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Reading kashu's last post, I don't see any anger in it at all. He/she thanked everyone, but very politely stated that some were getting off topic and missing the original question. There's no sense in people wasting their effort describing long term growing conditions when the cuttings are being attacked by fungus within a few days. This is the problem, and there's no reason for anyone to feel insulted by someone trying to keep people focused on it. So no worries.

Kashu, I have rooted cuttings in Al's mix without problem, but never something as large as those pictured here. My guess is that they just need more time for such a large wound to callous properly. You might want to take this over to the container forum where Al will see it. He has more experience than anyone growing in this soil.


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Kashu,

Perhaps I didn't read closely enough, but why are you using this particular mix when it's causing so many problems? With your Crassula experience you no doubt know that these plants can grow in a variety of mediums and should root quite easily, but apparently Al's Gritty Mix (AGM) might not be the most propitious of environments for the cuttings, at least at the cuttings stage. Let them air-root first and maybe then they can be plunked in AGM.


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

For the record, I didn't allow the big Jade cutting (pictured above)
to form a callus. I cut the mold off, dusted with cinnamon, and stuck
the cutting into completely dry bark, perlite, and pumice. No water until
I saw new growth. One thing to remember, when making a gritty mix, is that
ingredients such as pumice and turface with great internal porosity actually hold
quite a bit of moisture. As a result, I've had to modify my watering habits on
already-potted plants, and I've reduced the amount of pumice in my new mixes.

Josh


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

And I might have confused 'gritty mix' with 'Al's gritty mix', quite possibly two entirely different things, eh?

Nitty Gritty Dirt Band on The Run


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Norma 2006, please accept my apologies as I did not mean for anyone to get offended. Although this may be my first time posting a question here, I have been lurking these forums for over 8 years. Most of what I know about the plants that I grow I have learned from this site. And I appreciate everyone sharing their knowledge and experience. But as penfold2 said, I felt some of the comments above did not pertain to my original question. This may have been my fault as I am not the best writer. Perhaps I did not state my question clearly enough.

Shanielynn, thanks for clarifying. I was hoping to get responses from people like you who have experience with this type of mix. Your method makes sense to me. I will try your misting method on one of the stems. Btw, I believe Josh was just summarizing the results of my experiment.

Penfold, I see what your saying about larger cuttings needing more time. But in the past I've rooted similar sized cuttings with similar amount of callusing in slightly damp potting soil and didn't have this problem. That's why it seems kind of strange to me. I'll post in the container forum, thanks for your help.

Cactusmcharris, I'm sure a lot of people are wondering why I insist on rooting in a mix that is obviously not working for me. Well, within the past few years I have read hundreds of posts about AGM (Al's gritty mix). And while it may not be right for everyone, I find that almost everything about this mix makes sense to me. It offers all that I want my plants to have in a potting media - increased drainage, better air circulation, long term stability, a college education (hehe), etc. That's why I said in the above post that I really wanted to love this mix. Also I was hoping to use it exclusively for all of my plants and not have to buy anymore soil. If AGM is beneficial for a plant and it's roots, why shouldn't I be able to root a cutting in it, right? So when I started having problems with these cuttings, I wasn't sure if I did something wrong or if there was a problem with the mix itself. I spent 6 month tracking down the ingredients for AGM and before I give up on it (or at least give up rooting in it), I want to make sure it's not an error on my part that's causing the problem. If it is the case that AGM is not the most propitious enviroment for my cuttings, I want to know WHY. That is exactly my question.

Josh, thanks for sharing your method. I have one stem in a completely dry mix so we'll see how that one goes. It's getting pretty hot here and the leaves are greying from lack of moisture so I'm not holding my breath. Btw, I've seen many of your pictures and you grow beautiful plants. Oh and I apologize for all my grammatical errors, I'm no english teacher :)


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Hahahaha...! Don't worry, I'm no grammar-hound! Besides, I'm on summer vacation. (I even had to take Traditional Grammar & Standard Usage twice at Sac State!).

Back to the Jades...
I prefer the cuttings dry, but with my big Jade I didn't have a choice. I discovered mold on the same day that I'd planned to put the cutting in a pot. I figured that the dry cinnamon + the dry mix would help "suck" moisture from the newly-cut stump and prevent mold/rot, so I just plopped it in there.

The old leaves on my large Jade cutting are very grey, as well. They certainly look "worse" before they look better again.

Josh


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Have any of you thought that perhaps, maybe, it could be the wrong time of the year to start these
African plants? Perhaps set aside in the shade until they form roots then put in the soil. This happens in all of the states east of the Mississippi. They don't like humidity this time of the year, they need to be started in very small pots, after then get some roots, or in the winter months, they are Winter growers. These are not jungle plants but grow on rocky hills sides. This is stated in all the books that I have, do you have books to look this up? Crasulady2


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

norma-2006
Is that an apology? Too many martinis? Why the hostility?

"I don't quite seem to understand the purpose of forums,...."
duh! move to go, do not collect $200

"they are insulted because they are not getting the response they want ....."
Sorry Norma, missed that bit. Can you point me to the quote?

Seems like you misinterpreted, god knows why, and were rude.


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Malcolm on the Couch,

You should do your trolling elsewhere - this is a jerk-free zone.


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To Return To Our Previous Subject

How about using that mix when the roots have been established? I can't provide the whys and wherefores that you're looking for, but isn't there sufficient empirical proof that now might not be the time to root them in that mix - I say that because it sounds like you might have a not-innumerable source of cuttings. Heavens knows I never rooted intentionally any C. ovata cuttings - all we had to do in SouCal was sling 'em on the ground and give them a splash of water now and then, so I don't know the challenges faced with this particular species, but I did root some C. muscosa v. cristata several times. Might there also be bottom heat missing? That would inhibit any fungus, I'm guessing. A cheap source of bottom heat is sun-warmed cement. I used a courtyard walkway for a rooting zone (mostly Crassulaceae but the occasional Alluaudia) and it worked most of the time. I never could get Aloe dichotoma cuttings to root, though.


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tbnt

"this is a jerk-free zone."

tell that to norma

you're crazy if you allow that sort of hostily.
who's apologizing to kashu?
i came here to learn but am out of here.

No manners, no honour.


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

I reread your first post (THE question) and I now see it properly. You had successes before trying to root in gritty mix. Now I see...
Just this afternoon I was telling my husband that even after drying my bark fines in the sun for (what seemed like forever) several days, sifting out the dust and then putting the larger pieces in a container, I noticed moisture on the inside of the clear bin I put them in. We are so humid and hot right now down here, I was actually telling him: "I think I'll sneek the bins inside one day to hide out in the bathtub."

With the air on, things dry much quicker than when kept outside. Maybe the mix was still too damp and you just didn't realize it. I would have never known had it not been for the storeage container and seeing the moisture on the sides...

BTW: when I said I'd hide them out in the bathtub, I meant the containers with the lids off =D! I have a 2 year old boy who just luvs dirt!

Just ask Al about it. He is a very patient and kind teacher. He is starting thread #9 about container soils, so maybe start there.
Hope every potting works out for you.

Shannon

Here is a link that might be useful: Container Soils - Water Movement & Retention IX


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Let's try this again, Malcolm. It's perhaps best if you leave, as you've no idea who you insulted (which shows you haven't a clue, lad) and you misinterpreted it anyway. However, if you do decide to stay, I shall insist on an apology to Norma.

Insult me all you wish, but heaping contumely on Fair Maiden Norma is not going to happen here without you being taken out behind the woodshed for an attitude adjustment.


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Jade Cuttings, Rooting Hormone?

Oh, one more thing, Kashu - have you used rooting hormone (either Rootone or that rooting gel)? You mght want to give it a try.


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Norma, it *is* winter right now ;) in South Africa, that is.....

I'm not having any problems rooting Jades. Of course, I don't live east of the Mississippi, either...
so I know you're not addressing me. Besides, I'm blessed with 15% humidity during our summer months.

I *assumed* that we're all starting our cuttings in a shady/protected location,
especially this time of year. The cuttings will lose too much moisture if they're
left in direct sun. But...once the new growth has hardened off, feel free to begin
blasting your cuttings with UV ;)

Norma, my Jades are all going through a growth spurt right now, since we've just passed
the summer dormancy. I've noticed that several cuttings have struck nice deep roots and
they are taking off. I've been pruning my established Jades, too, since I'll be able
to get another solid three months of growth. I might even prune again before I bring them
in for our winter.

Josh


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Gritty mix

Jeff,
the "gritty mix" that I reference is, indeed, an approximation of Al's mix.
However, I use volcanic pumice in place of Turface, and I use sharp quartz gravel
(and Perlite) in place of the granite grit. The pine/fir bark is the same. I find
that the sharp gravel really encourages root development.

Josh


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Hi Norma, I agree with you. Now is not the best time to be rooting jades here in NJ. Can't speak for all the states east of the Mississippi, but it's getting pretty hot and muggy here and will probably stay that way for at least another 2 months. Don't worry, I'm not baking my cuttings in full sun. They're in a cooler shaded area until they get some roots, hopefully.

Cactusmcharris, you're giving me great suggestions to increase my chances of rooting these guys and I know many people use rooting hormone and bottom heat successfully. I'm just trying to keep as many of the variables as constant as possible while changing the potting media. Since I don't usually use rooting hormone/bottom heat, I'm not going to use it for these cuttings. It's ok if I lose these jades, at this point it's all an experiment.

From what Shanielynn and Greenman28 are saying about their potting media, I think my problem is that I'm underestimating the moisture content of my gritty mix. My thought was that my original gritty mixture was completely dry with the exception of the rinsed grit. The bark chips and the turface that I'm using look and feel totally dry. But due to their porous nature, they're probably retaining some moisture internally. So the combined moisture content of my mix is probably greater than what I thought and more than what my cuttings need. Shannon, now that I think about it, I have seen condensation inside my clear plastic bag of bark. But it was ever so slight and the big bag of bark is so light that I didn't think bark=added moisture. It's kinda starting to make sense. Thanks everyone!


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

I am very new to this forum and enjoy (almost) everything I am learning, including proper etiquette. It is hard to read people the correct way sometimes in written word alone. Without facial expressions, mannerisms, etc... It is hard to 'read' people you don't know personally or at least speak to often in this manner. I think the majority of us are here to learn something. I hope I never 'came across' the wrong way in my replies. Like I said I am no expert. Which brings me to another Talpa thread... =D Hopefully this helps clarify why we are all 'here'

Here is a link that might be useful: Learning stuff


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

  • Posted by rjj1 Norman OK Zone7 (My Page) on
    Tue, Jul 21, 09 at 18:37

I cleaned up my large plant last month before trying to re root it. Took 100 tip cuttings and planted them in 2 trays. As of today 99 have rooted. I withered up and became compost.

These have not been in shade, only under shadecloth. Temps have ranged anywhere from 96 to 112 degrees the last month. The last few days a northern blew through and has kept us out of triple digits.

I misted them every day with a hose end 2 gpm mist head. Because of the heat and the use of very little soil, they dried out quickly and I didn't have to worry about rot. I now need to feed the starving little ones and water them more.

Back by no demand at all, the ever unpopular clickable thumb

Photobucket
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By the by. May the bird of paradise poop in the cola of anyone who attacks and slanders my dear Norma. She is a fine lady that deserve everyone's respect and gratitude for her service and generosity over the years here.

randy


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix=

  • Posted by rjj1 Norman OK Zone7 (My Page) on
    Tue, Jul 21, 09 at 18:44

Hmm,

That I that withered was really a 1. Silly keyboard. :-)

withered


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Very nice tip cuttings from a very sunny spot I "assume". =D

I have some about that size or smaller from leaf prop's and am hardening them off for my 'sand pit'. I haven't been able to put them out in the horrible (non-triple digit) heat and humidity (way more than triple, if it were truly possible).

Shannon


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

  • Posted by rjj1 Norman OK Zone7 (My Page) on
    Tue, Jul 21, 09 at 19:38

You may assume or you can choose to not believe me, which ever trips your trigger.

randy


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Shannon, you have been nothing but helpful. To me you come across as a nice, friendly person in all your posts. Thank you.

Randy, I think all of your plants are AMAZING! I'm sorry you withered up and became compost. Haha! If only you could see the hack job I did on my adenium, pruning it to make it more like one of yours. You'd die laughing.


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Randy, I completely believe you and take your word, even without watching the weather channel =D! It is hotter than heck! I have a screened patio and a ceiling fan, otherwise I would not see the outside during summer and I've lived down here(SWFL)since I was 8. Less humidity and heat sounds terrrriffficc!

My jades props won't take even partial sun until I've slid them into it. So maybe I came across as a bit envious...
They really do look great! My little sun babies are completely red underneath once they reach full UV. Even the momma has some weird stuff going on right now- some branches have leaves that are tri-lobed, for lack of a better term. Weird really.

Thank you for understanding me kashu. I appreciate the compliments. I know I don't know everything, nor will I ever, but it is nice to have a place to exchange ideas and not be tossed in the compost pile for doing so.

Shannon


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a MI (My Page) on
    Tue, Jul 21, 09 at 22:52

Hi, guys. Shannon left a link to this thread, so I came & read through it. This is a picture of the soil most often referred to as the gritty mix.
Photobucket

You can see by the particle size that it has tremendous macro-porosity. It's made from equal parts by volume of 1/8-1/4" fir (or pine) bark, screened Turface (hi-fired clay granules), and crushed granite (grower grit - about 1/8" pieces). You can vary the water retention of this soil by keeping the bark component at 1/3 while varying the % of Turface and granite. E.g.. a mix of
3 bark
4 Turface
2 granite
would hold considerably more water than
3 bark
4 granite
2 Turface
You can also simply add more Turface or granite which has the effect of reducing the organic component.

I've started hundreds of different cuttings, many succulents, in this soil, and never had damping off issues, so I would bet that Kashu's issues are other cultural or inherent in the plant. I suggested a sulfur dusting of the cut end and sticking the plant in dry soil for at least a week w/o water, after at least 2 weeks callusing time.

Take care - just wanted to say hey.

Al


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Al,

So first Willie Mays and now you - The Say Hey Kids. Hope to see your wisdom here more often.


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

  • Posted by rjj1 Norman OK Zone7 (My Page) on
    Wed, Jul 22, 09 at 6:04

Kashu

I'm feeling much better after being redydrated thank you. :-)

You should see some of my hack jobs.

Shannon,

My Hummel's won't take full sun here through July and August. They get unfiltered morning and then the other half of the day through shade coloth and seem to do ok. The green leafed ovatas tend to handle sun better.

Look great? Hmmm. They look well done and very thirsty.

randy


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

In general but not all, variegated plants grow slower, and are more sensitive to sun, and watering. I also have 'Hummel Sunset' it's gets 30% shade cloth, I cut it back this year in the spring, it has not grow new leaves yet. It will start growing again here in October, when the nights cool down to below 50F I have had the good fortune to meet the man, but at that time I really didn't know who is was, he actually handed me a small piece of that plant. Never have had trouuble starting it. Jeff I'm not sending out 'Flying Boxes' any more.


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Aha!
So, Randy and Norma, I guess I shouldn't have my Hummel's in full sun?

I'll go out and move it into a partially-shaded location immediately. Yikes!

For some reason, my thinking was exactly backward! I thought (or read/heard
somewhere) that variegated plants needed *more sun* to conduct photosynthesis
and to maintain their variegation.

Josh


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Don't forget about the micro climates, even in our own garden. If it is happy don't move it. Don't change anything. Norma


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Norma,

I too have given it up since moving to northern climes, but I will be trading some Opuntia across provincial lines - I'm soooo excited.

Josh,

As an FYI, I had a number of in-ground variegated plants (Crassulas, Kalanchoes and Portulacarias) in full sun in SD and they never lost their variegation nor had it threatened - the only response to increased sun was a reddening of the leaves, if that.

As for the potted ones, they seemed to show the reddening sooner:

Photobucket


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Should my "Hummel's Sunset" receive the same amount of sun as my other Jades?

Josh


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

Josh,

I'd say it's personal taste - somes like 'em green, somes don't. Adequately watered, it should, like any of the other species/cultivars, grow quite well in full sun.

But I always did like them looking stressed.


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RE: jade cuttings getting moldy in gritty mix

My sun here where I live is definitely more intense that other areas. I live in a semi-desert. More like Africa. If you cut back water they will get red as well, or yellow if about to die. I water here once a week, as does the Huntington, which has at least 60% shade cloth, and sometimes this time of the year may water twice a week, just to cool down the soil. They don't stress their plants they need to be sold, they are fertilized as well.
I am inland about 30 miles we don't get cool breezes, just Santa Ana winds, we are dry and that is why we have wild fires that take down anything in the way.
Jeff if you come near this area again, I have several opuntia that I think you may like to grow. They came from areas of cold weather. Norma
I gave two hybrids to my Son, asking him to grow them because they live in Los Vegas, and it is hotter than what I get here. They are from Israel, and was hybridized for the fruit. We haven't been able to flower them, just not hot enough. Hugs, Norma


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