Return to the Cacti & Succulents Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Dormancy Table

Posted by brodyjames Wisconsin, 5 (My Page) on
Sat, Jul 24, 10 at 15:25

Found this table at highlandsucculents.com Don't know how accurate it is, but I thought it a good jumping off point, especially for newer C&S growers like me.

Nancy

DORMANCY TABLE

WINTER DORMANT

This group is generally regarded as the "summer growers". They have adapted to our northern hemisphere cycle and are dormant from November through February. Many of these will also enter a pseudo rest period for a few weeks during the hottest part of the summer before putting on a final burst of growth in September and October.


Adenia
Adenium
Agave
Alluaudia
Brachystelma
Bursera
Calibanus
Ceropegia
Cissus
Cyphostemma
Didieria
Dorstenia
Echeveria
Encephalartos
Euphorbia
Ficus
Fockea
Huernia
Ibervillea
Ipomoea
Jathropha
Lithops
Monadenium
Moringa
Operculicarya
Pachypodium
Pedilanthus
Plumeria
Pseudolithos
Pterodiscus
Raphionacme
Siningia
Stapelianthus
Synadenium
Tillandsia
Trichocaulon
Trichodiadema
Xerosicyos


SUMMER DORMANT

Usually referred to as the "winter growers", these genera are dormant during the warmer months of May through August. Their primary growth actually occurs during autumn and spring while slowing considerably during true winter. Many will exhibit marginal growth during the summer months as well especially in the Lily and Crassulaceae families.

Adromischus
Aeonium
Aloe
Anacampseros
Astroloba
Avonia
Bowiea
Bulbine
Ceraria
Conophytum
Cotyledon
Crassula
Dioscorea
Dudleya
Fouqueria
Gasteria
Gibbaeum
Graptopetalum
Graptoveria
Haemanthus
Haworthia
Kalanchoe
Neohenricia
Othonna
Pachycormus
Pachyphytum
Pachyveria
Pelargonium
Peperomia
Portulacaria
Sansevieria
Sarcocaulon
Sedeveria
Sedum
Senecio
Stomatium
Talinum
Tylecodon


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Dormancy Table

That's definitely a nice reference. There will always be some exceptions and tweaks related to the the plants' climate in cultivation compared to native habitat.

I don't understand the point of the statement "They have adapted to our northern hemisphere cycle". This just adds to the confusion and is an unnecessary remark. Winter is colder and summer is warmer. The hemisphere has no bearing on this unless plants are being imported directly from one location to another.

As for the summer dormant plants, the dormancy depends greatly on temperature range and nighttime temps. Some of these plants can be active all summer long in the right conditions. And in areas where winter is long, dark and cool - some of these plants will most certainly be in active growth all summer long despite some heat and rain that they would otherwise not be so fond of.

No list, chart or second hand advice can ever replace what you see with your own eyes. Your plant will tell you when it is growing. That is the #1 thing you should learn to recognize. Then you will never have the need to refer to any chart.

That, in essence, is the art of horticulture.

x


 o
RE: Dormancy Table

These genera are in active growth now, but that may stop as we're finally seeing summer temperatures (where it doesn't get very cool at night) - today was 31C!

Kalanchoe
Crassula
Cyphostemma
Graptoveria, Graptopetalum, Pachyphytum, Pachyveria, Sedum, Echeveria, Cremnosedum
Aloe

I've certainly found it true that winter-growers were so in San Diego for Tylecodon, Pachycormus, Dudleya, and some Aeonium. I never grew enough Mesembs to know about them.


 o
RE: Dormancy Table

I'm taking the list with a grain of salt; simply as a "well, it's someplace to start" kind of thing, as I've noticed that my aloes and crassulas are all producing pups and rooting from fallen leaves. My E. tirucallis are putting out new leaves while my E. suzanneae and E. polygona aren't doing anything.

Nancy


 o
RE: Dormancy Table

Another site that is helpful:

http://www.bihrmann.com/caudiciforms/div/dorm.asp

As you, say use it's a place to start. The pictures
on this site are extremely valuable.


 o
RE: Dormancy Table

>I'm taking the list with a grain of salt; simply as a "well, it's someplace to start" kind of thing,

Indeed!

I've seen Adromischus listed as summer-dormant elsewhere as well, but the few species I have happily grow and flower during the summer!

Nancy, as a general observation, I've found that most Euphorbias have their growth spurts either in early summer, or starting in mid-summer. Only those in the E. milii complex grow continuously throughout the summer (for me, at least.) And I'd call many of the larger Kenyan/Tanzanian Monadeniums "spring dormant," since they grow through summer and flower in fall/winter.

-R


 o
RE: Dormancy Table

Thank you very much for that!

But ask you, how come my Jades are not dormant..It has been very hot here, and they have been continually growing...Even my cuttings rooted fast. I see no difference in their growing cycle from winter to summer...as long as I am watering correctly, and they are getting sunlight, winter or summer, they grow..

Mike


 o
RE: Dormancy Table

X BRAVO! Each species is different. Learn to read your plants. That is the reason no list were made that I know of. That is the reason comments or advise is not given in books. I have San. in Flower now. Most of mine flower starting Sept. through the winter and start to grow after they flower. I have winter Crassula growing now, why I don't know. (multicava) I have some flowering one month out of season. Mine still go by the natural light available. wheather below the equator or north of the equator. I still can't find it in books even what color the flowers are suposed to be. EXAMPLE: Crassula barbarta white flowers, however I found one in Africa one with pink flowers and pink flower stems. I have a Crassula capitella v. trysiflora white flowers how ever I have one with pink flowers and pink flower stems. They are just not the same either are brother of sisters. BRAVO X Norma


 o
RE: Dormancy Table

Norma, a couple of my sans are blooming now too, these are ones in the ground that survived Ike & the freeze. I've never seen them bloom this time of year. This past winter threw all the plants off schedule. Then all the rain, I have cactus blooming right now, usually it's much earlier in the year for them.
Tally HO!


 o
RE: Dormancy Table

I know this is a really dumb question but I really just started growing succulents in my home a mere 2 months ago and am still learning.

I have a mix of summer and winter dormant plants according to the above. I know many succulents are not supposed to be watered more than once a month during the colder months because the cold can destroy their roots, I guess I thought this was the rule of thumb for all of them (I know it really is a plant by plant basis depending on lots of different things but I am just talking generally). Is this in direct relation to dormancy? So far I've only been watering my Sanseveria, Crassulas and Echeverias once a month and it SEEMS like this is ok (though my Crassulas seem to be moody right now but I saw that they lose some of their leaves this time of year, and they have healthy new growth so not too worried), my Sans is extremely pleased with me actually, and I think I even put it in the wrong soil (whoops - first house plant ever though!).

Anyway, so what I guess I need clarification on as a "newbie succulent gardener" is - summer dormant means water less in summer, winter dormant means water less in winter, or it just means that is when it takes a break from growing? Again, I know it depends on a lot of different things but I'm talking about generally.

Thanks for the help!


 o
RE: Dormancy Table

First of all, there is a distinction between obligate summer/winter growers, and opportunistic growers. Obligate summer/winter growers are genetically programmed to go dormant at certain times of the year, while opportunistic growers go dormant only when seasonal conditions force them to. So obligate summer/winter growers will go dormant no matter how you treat them, while opportunistic growers can typically be kept growing year round.

Withholding water is only necessary when there is a risk of rot, or when trying to influence growth form (e.g. fattening up caudiciforms). With a porous soil, and sufficient heat and light, rot risk is greatly reduced, and most plants can be watered whenever their soil dries out. This is how I treat many of my plants, and they do fine, dormant or not. The key is to water only when the soil dries out, not on a set schedule.


 o
RE: Dormancy Table

Interesting! Thanks for explaining, I think I may be under watering my little plants then!


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Cacti & Succulents Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here