Return to the California Gardening Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Granny Smith Apple Tree

Posted by tammypie 9 (tamsammut55@gmail.com) on
Fri, Dec 7, 12 at 23:25

Hello,

I have a Granny Smith Apple tree that I grew from a seed about 2 years ago. It grows in a 5 gallon pot and grew up pretty fast that I have to stake it to keep it straight up.

My question, is when should I re-pot to the next larger size pot?

Also, all the leaves turned brown and dropped. I assume it's dedicious(sp?) and doing what it's supposed to do in the fall?

Thanks, TammyPie


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Granny Smith Apple Tree

Yes your Granny Smith should be going into dormancy and dropping its leaves. Growing from seed for two years the container is probably still large enough. You can knock it out of the container and look at the roots if in doubt. I am guessing this is a fun project and not a long range effort to grow a bearing apple tree. Al


 o
RE: Granny Smith Apple Tree

Hi Al,

So one night 2 years ago I cut open a Granny Smith apple and noticed that one of the seeds had a large root growing out of it, so I decided to plant it, as I've never planted an apple tree from seed before. Now it's over 3 feet high and I have it tied to a stake because it leans over. Seems to grow very quickly from a seedling. Tammy


 o
RE: Granny Smith Apple Tree

FYI, not to rain on your parade, but you in all probability do not have a "Granny Smitth Apple Tree", you have an apple whose seed parent is Granny Smith with an unknown pollen parent. Some fruit grow pretty close to the parent (canning peaches I am told are one example) but most fruit grown from seed are nothing like the "mother" fruit, just as few humans look exactly like their mother. Yours might be just as yummy as Granny Smith, or better, or not tasty at all, but you won't know until you get your first apple.

Carla in Sac


 o
RE: Granny Smith Apple Tree

As Carla says, if grown for apples, there is no way of knowing what the fruit may be like. Beyond that, a seedling will be a standard size tree, perhaps up to 30 feet, and may not produce the first apple for up to 10 years. Apple seedlings tend to grow pretty straight if the light is equal all around, and should not need to be staked to keep vertical. Al


 o
RE: Granny Smith Apple Tree

Well, it was not my intention to grow an apple, I just cut open this GS apple and there was this seed that was sprouting. I've never grown an apple tree from seed before so I immediately planted it in a small pot.

Bottom line - I don't CARE what the resulting fruit looks like or tastes like or makes fruits at all.


 o
RE: Granny Smith Apple Tree

Since you like adventure: Yes it is very unlikely the fruit will be worth eating. But there actually was a Granny Smith. From the variety list of Kevin Hauser: "Granny Smith Australia, 1868 Few folk realize that this is the oldest supermarket apple variety. It sprouted from a washtub of French crab apple trimmings tossed out by an actual granny, Maria Anne Smith of the Ryde District of New South Wales." She got it from a seed so there is a chance (probably at least less than 1:200)

And since you like adventure and assuming this seedling is growing in your yard's native soil it will make an excellent seedling rootstock if it survives its first year or two (or five). You can practice all manner of grafting onto it with apple varieties who's scions you acquire locally or through exchange groups. Grafting: I bet you can do it!

Here is a link that might be useful: Kuffel Creek Apple Varieties List


 o
RE: Granny Smith Apple Tree

See this link below also...all hope is not lost.

Here is a link that might be useful: Auntie Debra apple variety


 o
RE: Granny Smith Apple Tree

When transplanting you should also knock all the dirt off the roots to check if the seedling roots have curled around inside the pot, common with vigorous trees. straighten them out or trim shorter, as if planted this way the tree will strangle itself.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the California Gardening Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here