Return to the Camellia Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Early Sasanqua Variety in Bloom

Posted by jay_7bsc (My Page) on
Sat, Sep 4, 10 at 18:40

Early this morning I walked up the driveway to the road to pick up our newspaper and noticed the unmistakable fragrance of sasanqua floating on the air. I looked up and saw quite a good number of pink blooms on our 'Pink Dauphin' sasanqua, which never fails to be in bloom on or before Labor Day.


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Early Sasanqua Variety in Bloom

It is too early for mine but I have been wondering if anyone had any sansanquas blooming now!?!?! Perfect timing, jay_7bsc!


 o
RE: Early Sasanqua Variety in Bloom

Wow! Please take some pics to share!


 o
RE: Early Sasanqua Variety in Bloom

  • Posted by gaalan z7b(on map) 8(imby) (My Page) on
    Sun, Oct 3, 10 at 19:20

Wow that is early! I have a Tanya that has been the first to bloom for a few years now, and usually within the last week of September. It hasn't started yet. I have a Sparkling Burgundy that has a partly open flower that looks like it will shrivel and die rather than finish opening. Technically its the first to break bud, but as yet none have truly begun.


 o
RE: Early Sasanqua Variety in Bloom

  • Posted by gaalan z7b(on map) 8(imby) (My Page) on
    Tue, Oct 5, 10 at 17:56

Tanya now has its first. There are several other emerged flowers with single petals fully unfurled.


 o
RE: Early Sasanqua Variety in Bloom

I think my sasanqua Bonanza is blooming early too. It started blooming last week. I thought they don't bloom until early winter and this is the beginning of fall.


 o
RE: Early Sasanqua Variety in Bloom

'Pink Dauphin' must be one of the earliest sasanqua varieties. In our climate, the disadvantage of an early-flowering sasanqua is that its blooms endure temperatures in the nineties and wilt quickly from the heat. Their fragrance also attracts a lot of yellow jackets and ants in search of nectar.


 o
RE: Early Sasanqua Variety in Bloom

We have a sasanqua camellia that is maybe 25 years old and tree-sized now. It was mislabeled as 'Hiryu' when bought from a big box store, but clearly isn't that. I'm fairly certain that it's 'Hugh Evans' as there's a perfectly matched picture for it, complete with some twisting of the flower petals, in Jennifer Trehane's book.

Last year this one began blooming in late September and bloomed some even through December. I cut some branches several times in December and early January, figuring on just keeping it until the few remaining blooms lost their petals (which took about a week for a freshly cut bloom!)... but then I noticed that the small buds that had shown no color when first cut had been swelling quite quickly... and a few days later they started blooming too. On the last branch cut in January, there were no open blooms and nothing but the tiniest bloom buds; I was cutting the branches for their greenery only. I know this is hard to believe, but some of its tiny, tiny buds developed just fine in our kitchen, and within about ten days we started having blooms from those "greenery" branches--in January! Some of the buds that ended up opening as flowers were so small when the branches were first cut that I hadn't even been aware they were bloom buds at all.

The first few years this camellia was planted I thought it was no great shakes... and then as it began to mature, the weeping quality of its branches got to me. It's a lovely plant overall and a fragrant one too; I'm glad we have it! I could scarcely cook supper last year for pausing to sniff it in its vase by the kitchen sink. Its blooms don't compete well with japonicas, but can pass for a Japanese still life once they're nicely arranged in a vase. Anyway, don't buy this one for the showy perfection of its blooms, but for the overall beauty of the plant in the landscape. (And if you are tempted to not keep it the first few years, as I was, well, just wait a few more years before deciding. If you like the form of weeping willow trees, you're very likely to end up really liking Hugh Evans, with its gorgeous weeping evergreen foliage and a bonus of tons of noticeably bright flowers.) Considering that it's a camellia, it's a relatively fast grower. (It has been tree-sized for about the last ten years or so.)

Hugh Evens began blooming a bit later this year, probably because it wasn't adequately watered during our 5-6 weeks without any rain at all. As soon as we got rain, it started blooming promptly (around October 2, I think).

Shishigashira bloomed last year starting in September, but hasn't quite opened this year yet either--probably due to the drought and also the fact that the plant was just relocated in March. Lovely low Shishigashira is covered with buds, though, and in its new location in front of the Hugh Evans, it will be very noticeable.

No pictures, but perhaps this year I'll actually get around to taking some?

Oh, Bonanza... a hiemalis, is new here (not yet planted) and started blooming on October 6. The blooms actually do look as large and beautiful as their pictures. The foliage is really nice too.

Isn't this a great time of the year!

Best wishes,
Mary

Here is a link that might be useful: Bonanza hiemalis camellia


 o
RE: Early Sasanqua Variety in Bloom

I am so excited! I just started getting camellias this year, so wasn't sure what to expect. To my surprise and delight, my first camellia bloom smiled up at me this morning! Hanajamin, aka hana jiman, with a lot more buds to open.

In fact, all the camellias I acquired this year have buds and I am so thrilled and excited, looking forward to seeing their blooms for the very first time. This has really extended my gardening season. I'm so glad I've finally found camellias! :)


 o
RE: Early Sasanqua Variety in Bloom

  • Posted by gaalan z7b(on map) 8(imby) (My Page) on
    Tue, Oct 26, 10 at 16:38

First flower on the first of two Yuletide here. I love that single red!


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Camellia Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here