Return to the Carnivorous Plants Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
drosera adelae sunlight

Posted by bryan18 CA (My Page) on
Sun, Jul 1, 07 at 0:05

Hey all,
I was wondering if you can grow a drosera adelae in a window that recieves no direct sunlight at all, just bright indirect light. All the other windows i have recieve atleast 3 hours of extremely hot direct sunlight and i know for a fact that my poor sundew would get cooked :(


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

Drosera adelea would do fine under those conditions, but i would rethink about the other windows. Many cp's thrive in direct sun for at LEAST 3 hours. Your sundew could probably take even 4 or 5. Those other windows sound like a fine place to grow sundews or even nepenthes if you wanted too. I need a little bit more of those kind of windows...my dad doesnt like my plants in the kitchen...
Your sundew should be fine either way.

Good luck,
Squim 4


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

Thanks squim 4,
i have tried growing a nepenthes in one of those windows and it got cooked. I think its because when direct sunlight hits my windows it gets up to 90 degrees of burning hot sunlight. Southern California obviously isnt as cool and humid as everyone thinks...i think im going to try to grow it under a plant light. Have you had any experience growing drosera adelae under plant lights?


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

If it's BRIGHT indirect light it'll do just fine. Mine are doing great AND one is blooming at the moment. I'll put a pic in the gallery....

Tom


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

Drosera adelae do great under florescent lights of 6000 to 12000 lumens. Mine are 5-6 inches from 12000 lumens of 40 watt shop lights. In under 6 months they have gone from one old adult plant that flowered and started to die back, to well over 30-40 young clones of which about 6 are adult now. I had to repot them twice already to make room for them all. The adult plant is still alive and trying to regrow now. Usually 2 year old plants die back after flowering and cloning themselves so much, but I think replanting them and cutting off some roots and chopping off it's old leaves causes spontaneous regrowth as it keeps sending up healthier looking leaves and sideshoots from it's main growth crown.

I would think that most of your windows would be fine, but if in doubt, you can just keep the plant farther from the window. Burn usually occurs when the plant is right against the window and if the window gets direct sun for several hours during noontime hours. You can test your adelae by placing it in the indirect sun window and seeing how well colored it's leaves and tentacles are. Adelae are able to survive in far less light than other carnivorous plants, so a little experimentation will not harm them. If the light is too little, it will begin to show fading of it's red tentacles and might not produce much dew. As you step up light intensity, it's tentacles will produce more dew and become redder and the leaves will eventually become narrower and reddish themselves in higher light intensities like mine are doing under florescents. If you notice fading colors give em a brighter place. If you notice some wilting or leaf burn after a couple of days, immediately step back the light intensity. Adelae is one carnivorous plant that can never adapt to full sun outside, but should be able to handel some good bright light in an indirect sun or morning sun window for a couple hours. Windows do cut back on ultraviolet radiation a lot, and that is the one thing that causes leaf burn most often. Sometimes just moving a plant back a foot from a window can make a big difference in the UV damage potential while allowing the plant good strong light for a few hours.


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

ah, thats a different story. sorry, i was assuming you lived in the eastern part of the country like me. I aggree with mutant hybrid, if you still want to go for the window idea. Just move it back a bit. Also, it helps humidity wise and cools the plant down if you keep a spray bottle full of distilled water, and mist the plant from time to time. Sorry, i dont have any experience with grow lights, i keep all my plants either outside or in a window..i mean kitchen sliding glass door. I'd just take mutant hybrid's advice...by the look of his plants he obviously to knows what he's talking about....wow thats alot of sundews...

Squim4


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

I've actually decided to grow the sundew in the bright window that recieves indirect sun. It's developing a new leaf but remains dewless. I'm going to try to grow a nepenthes ventricosa in the same windowsill...any suggestions on how to grow one of those?


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

They do fine at a window sill and even flower.


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

it it funny, I myself am growing a n.ventricosa "red form" in indirect shade as we speak. Its in a south facing windowsill, so It doesn't really get alot of direct sun. They adapt very well, and grow fairly quickly. Mine is recovering from some replanting shock at the moment, however. If your's encounters any shock from to little or too much light, then just have patience, it will adapt. Water it 2-3 times a week, or when the soil gets dry. I would suggest misting with distilled water from time to time to increase humidity.

Good luck,
Squim4


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

i just bought a full spectrum lightbulb in which i want to grow a nepenthes ventricosa under. It says it puts out 650 lumens and uses 60 wats. is that not enough light or too much?
sorry for asking all these questions, i've just recently been interested in growing tropical carnivorous plants, and i cant grow them outside because its too dry


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

I have my N. sanguinea under 12000 lumens of florescent light for 16 hours a day 5 inches from leaves. 650 lumens would really not be enough to grow anything except an ivy. Carnivorous plants all need more light, even the low light ones like butterworts and adelaes need fairly intense light, just not direct sun. In general, the sun hits the surface of the planet Earth with up to 50,000 lumens, which is about what Venus Flytraps and Sarracenias expect to get at least a few hours of the day. If you can ramp it up to 6000 lumens, it would be fine for lower light plants like butterworts and D. adelae and partial light plants like many Nepenthes as long as the light is close to the leaves, like 3-4 inches. Ramping it up to two 40 watt double tube shop lights on a cheap Chriastmas tree light timer cost me only 20 bucks and is very efficient for all of the partial light plants and even keeps my Venus Flytrap alive for now.

Anything over that would be gravy for the partial or low light plants, but great for the North American and higher light loving plants. If you could get 24000-36000 lumens inside, you would be able to grow virtually anything in a garden in your home.


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

are "soft white" compact fluorescent bulbs acceptable?


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

Actually the soft white is partially frosted I think, so might not allow as much light out, however, the cool white bulbs would be great. I think most of the 100 watt equivalent florescent compacts would produce about 2,500-3000 lumens each, so you might need several set up over the plant to give it about 6000-12000 lumens total 5-6 inches away.


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

thanks mutant hybrid,
im thinking of purchasing a 85 watt compact fluorescent full spectrum high definition bulb which produces 4200 lumens and the color temp is 6500 Kelvin. To add to that, a 32 watt full spectrum high definition bulb which produces 2100 lumens and the color temp is also 6500 Kelvin. i will keep them about 6 to 8 inches above the plants. im planning on growing my drosera adelae and purchasing two nepenthes ventricosa red forms and a drosera capensis to grow under this set up. Does that set up sound good? any comments would be greatly appreciated!


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

Sounds good. It really is the lumens, not the wattage, that matters. The full spectrum sounds good too. plants tend to do less well in incandescent light as it is of the wrong spectrum, but those florescents usually have a wide spectrum white light that is closer to real sunlight, just not as strong. Keep em on for about 16 hours a day and adjust the hight as needed if any of those plants looses coloration on their leaves. It is easy to tell with D. capensis and D. adelae as they will loose their red tentacle coloration if they do not get enough light and grow new leaves every couple of days, so it is fast and easy to just watch the sundews for light troubles.


 o
RE: drosera adelae death cube

I bought a d.adelae from lowes in a death cube but i don't know how to take it out of the death cube with out hurting it please help!!!!!!!!!


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

Prepare a new pot and gently coaz the plant out of the cube. Place in new pot and add water.


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

I'm sure they're thinking about the flimsy plastic thingamajig around the base of the plant that keeps it from getting tossed around. Turn the cube upside down easing the plant and framework out. Cut the framework off with scissors.


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

i just figured out i wasn't suppose to give it tap water witch up here the tap water is hard i have been giving it hard tap water for abount 2-3 weeks do you think it will still live it still has leaves abount 7 of them that are still green out of the originally 8 should i just start giving it distilled water from now on and hope it lives


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

Rinse the media thoroughly with pure water or change the media. It's iffy after 3 weeks but may survive. Tommy knows the D. adelae better than anyone else here.


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

I happened to get a small drosera adelae with some live sphagnum and a few drosera capensis that tagged along also. I had everything in a south facing window that gets sun almost all year except the summer solstice when the sun is highest. I figured everything was fine, and it was, except the drosera adelae which absolutely protested direct sun. I know that sun here is intense and can easily heat things up by 20F or more just by not heating the front room and letting the sun heat it up. The room itself just from sunlight and even in winter can get from 50-55F to 80F if warmer and will go up at least 10F on a colder day. I realized I was baking the drosera adelae after I realized I even had it and the leaves were all dark brown and dead looking. I moved the plant under florescent lights and it was doing better but they also do not seem to like much water at the roots. By far it is the most finicky plant I have ever dealt with but I will keep trying to please it until it dies or starts growing better. I just think using anything but bright light is too much for that plant and you should start off with lower light and gradually get it used to more bright light. My plant acted like it was fried just from morning sun for 3- 4 hrs so even that may be too much. I hope that helps.


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

My Adelae plants all sit in water, about a half an inch at all times. They grow like weeds. Bright, indirect sun or under florescent lights about 5 inches above the plant. Easily started by leaf cuttings. Late afternoon or early morning Sun is fine though. This is weak sunlight.


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

I happened to get a small drosera adelae with some live sphagnum and a few drosera capensis that tagged along also. I had everything in a south facing window that gets sun almost all year except the summer solstice when the sun is highest. I figured everything was fine, and it was, except the drosera adelae which absolutely protested direct sun. I know that sun here is intense and can easily heat things up by 20F or more just by not heating the front room and letting the sun heat it up. The room itself just from sunlight and even in winter can get from 50-55F to 80F if warmer and will go up at least 10F on a colder day. I realized I was baking the drosera adelae after I realized I even had it and the leaves were all dark brown and dead looking. I moved the plant under florescent lights and it was doing better but they also do not seem to like much water at the roots. By far it is the most finicky plant I have ever dealt with but I will keep trying to please it until it dies or starts growing better. I just think using anything but bright light is too much for that plant and you should start off with lower light and gradually get it used to more bright light. My plant acted like it was fried just from morning sun for 3- 4 hrs so even that may be too much. I hope that helps.


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

WTF is that about Florida/Jersey split personality guy/kid??

Some of your post didn't make sense the first time and doesn't any more or less the second.


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

taz6122: if you left out tap water for a day or two in say a pitcher, would that be alright to give to the drosera or does it have to be distilled? i've actually been watering my nepenthes well over a year using that method and sometimes just straight tap and it seems to be doing fine.


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

I wouldn't use it on drosera. Nepenthes is more tolerable.


 o
RE: drosera adelae sunlight

They really do fine whether at a window sill or a grow rack or under artificial lighting. Here are mine, taken from this week:

D. adelae

D. adelae


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Carnivorous Plants Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here