Return to the Carolina Gardening Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Question on Trees

Posted by nannerbelle 7b (My Page) on
Mon, Apr 28, 08 at 23:06

I have a question and want to see if someone can offer any advice. My acreage is very flat and has been a previous tree farm. My young pine and hardwood is growing nicely and I have a nice population of young hardwood and pine trees in the 5 to 6 ft range on the property. I also have some "glades" of nice older oak. I'm trying to build up my wind and privacy break as others are starting to move in around me and I really don't want to see the houses. I'm trying to build the effect of a driveway that goes down into a forest. My house is 650 ft off the road (basically my house is in the middle of 15 acres) and honestly I don't want to see my neighbors houses or the hunting camp behind my property from my house or my immediate yard. I'm looking at putting in some fast growing, maybe evergreen trees as a "edge" on my yard and gardens to help block wind and the view of others houses. I'm looking at Colorado Blue Spruce as one choice. I love the look of those and love the fact that they are evergreen. I'm also looking at Lombardy Poplar for the fast growth. My reservations are I am concerned the Blue Spruce won't thrive in my zone/climate. I'm reading hardy to Zone 7 and I'm 7B borderline 8. I am hesitant on the Poplar because of the fact it isn't an evergreen to help in the winter. Right now I'm thinking a mix of the two may be a solution. However, I still have the concern on the spruce. Any thoughts or experience with the Blue Spruce? And do any of you have a recommendation that may be better suited for a nice wind and privacy block for me? Thanks!!


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Question on Trees

Have you thought of holly to plant for privacy. There are many, many different kinds and I assume the growth rate and height also vary a lot too.

We have a 'Holly Society' here. That would be a good source of information for you.

Just a suggestion.

Linda


 o
RE: Question on Trees

I would certainly suggest you look into Tulip Poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) instead of Lombardy Poplar (and they are not related, they just have similar common names). It is a native tree, related to Magnolias, and is very fast growing.

As for evergreens, I think a mixed group might be best. Hollies, as suggested, a few more native pines (white pine perhaps), perhaps a few wax myrtle, there is Carolina cherry laurel. These are plants that you know can do well. Plant one spruce where you can see it so that you can enjoy it, but don't sink your money into it.

Here is a link that might be useful: Reconsider a Lombardy article


 o
RE: Question on Trees

I don't have a blue spruce but out at the fairgrounds there is one at the entrance to the flower show area. It has been there for at least 10 years (probably closer to 20) and it is only maybe 20 feet tall (it fell over so it is hard to judge its true height). All the old timer gardeners that hang around out there speak of what a shame it is that only ONE of the group survived - which is why no one wants to cut the lone survivor down. Besides being a difficult tree for your area I don't believe it will give you the growth you need.

If it was me doing this, I would plant just about everything. And every year I would plant a few more. You want fast growing trees to provide a quick fix to the problems while the slower growing trees get their footing. You don't want one kind of tree either because all it would take is one disease moving in and you could lose all your hard work - or one storm blowing in and knocking all your mature trees over. I doubt one species will answer all your prayers. But trees grow well in this area so you shouldn't have too much trouble finding something that will work for you.


 o
RE: Question on Trees

As John suggested I think a mix would be a good idea. I have a stand of tulip poplar between my house and the rest of the neighborhood and they are lovely trees. Wax myrtles are excellent screens in full sun and have a lovely shape in part shade.


 o
RE: Question on Trees

Good info folks!! I appreciate the feedback. I can see that my suspicions about Blue Spruce for my climate was correct and this isn't an ideal place for the species. I'm backing away from that one. Tulip Poplar is interesting. I've seen them before and they are beautiful trees. Excellent point about a varity of trees, I hadn't really thought about disease as a factor. Great idea about adding Holly to the mix, I love it, and had one at my last house that was quite large and great cover! Worked like a champ to keep my teenager in her room instead of out the window. LOL What I need to do now is come up with a group of complementary trees to put in to block the view of some of my neighbors. I would love to use a lot of evergreens in this mix, it will help in the winter when all the hardwood leaves are gone! :-)


 o
RE: Question on Trees

Widely spaced Deodar cedar perhaps?


 o
RE: Question on Trees

If I had acreage instead of just an acre and a half I would have to have a Deodar cedar, a Southern Magnolia and Bald Cypress. Just to start,LOL. Oh and a Live Oak.


 o
RE: Question on Trees

Check out some of the Cryptomeria too. They're beautifull evergreens and some are fast growers. If you do a seach for them on this site you'll find some past conversations on different species/cultivars. Love the Bald Cypress, Deodar Cedars and Dawn Redwoods too!
Think about barks and textures, even wildlife. In front and between some of your larger trees add some other interesting and/or smaller trees and trees that add fall or winter interest.... Witchhazel(winter blooming), Sassafras, Sourwood (for the bees) and maybe some of the shorter understory bloomers to add fragrance and color to your spring. Just thinking about 15 acres and all the tress and shrubs!! :) Have Fun!!


 o
RE: Question on Trees

I drive by a home on my way to work that uses bamboo as a privacy screen. I think it looks great and it is evergreen. If you get the clumping bamboo, it will not spread like other bamboo. They control theirs by keeping a border in the ground and mowing down anything that pops up.


 o
RE: Question on Trees

I love the false cypresses, and some get quite large and are supposed to grow well in the south. The one I've been drooling over is chamaecyparis pisifera filifera. It has an upright and round form, and the lacy branches are wonderful. Probably a medium grower for an evergreen. The upright type comes in gray-blue and emerald-gold varieties.


 o
RE: Question on Trees

Although sweet bay isn't entirely evergreen, you might look into that one too if you go the way of mixed plantings. With sufficient moisture sweet bay blooms all summer.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Carolina Gardening Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here