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flying insects look like giant mosquitos a lot this year

Posted by nchomemaker 7 (My Page) on
Mon, May 5, 08 at 15:00

Does anyone else have a lot of those kind of bugs in their yard and flying around their property this year? I have lived here for 9 years and have never had so many of these things. They get in the house. They aren't mosquitos, but look like giant mosquitos. Anyone know what they are? Are they a good bug or a bad bug? They fly up from the grass when we walk in our yard. It kind of grosses me out because they are just everywhere.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: flying insects look like giant mosquitos a lot this year

They're crane flies. Harmless to people although don't know what their larvae eat.


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RE: flying insects look like giant mosquitos a lot this year

I don't know either but i watched one hatch out of one of my pots w/a plant just a few days ago, so i wonder what they're doing in my pots...


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RE: flying insects look like giant mosquitos a lot this year

I don't know if it is true or just an old wives tale, but I've always heard them called Mosquito Hawks and heard they actually feed on mosquitos. I've never researched it before. I am curious to hear the real and factual anwser.


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RE: flying insects look like giant mosquitos a lot this year

I found this online..."Despite their common names, crane flies do not prey on mosquitoes as adults, nor do they bite humans. Some larval crane flies may on occasion feed on mosquito larvae. [1] Adult crane flies feed on nectar or they do not feed at all; once they become adults, most crane fly species live only to mate and die. Their larvae, called "leatherjackets", "leatherbacks", "leatherback bugs" or "leatherjacket slugs", because of the way they move, consume roots (such as those of turf grass) and other vegetation, in some cases causing damage to plants. Therefore the crane fly is occasionally considered a mild turf pest in some areas. In 1935, Lord's cricket ground in London was among the venues affected by leatherjackets: several thousand were collected by ground staff and burned, because they caused bald patches on the wicket and the pitch took unaccustomed spin for much of the season.[2]"


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RE: flying insects look like giant mosquitos a lot this year

  • Posted by mrsig SC Zone 8 (My Page) on
    Tue, May 6, 08 at 7:44

Mosquito Hawk is what I always heard them called too. Always figured that was a misnomer though...thanks for the info...


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RE: flying insects look like giant mosquitos a lot this year

my husband vowed to eat the next one he sees, any suggestions on how to cook them....


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RE: flying insects look like giant mosquitos a lot this year

Shay,
Mosquito Hawks are best cooked on a skewer, over the grill, well done. (with a six pack).
LOL!


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RE: flying insects look like giant mosquitos a lot this year

Around here, dragon flies are called mosquito hawks. And unlike crane flies, they continue to eat mosquitos after reaching adulthood.


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