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Kumquat Growing

Posted by rescueme NY (My Page) on
Sat, Feb 7, 09 at 1:51

I would like to try and grow a Kumquat tree, starting from the seeds I have after eating the fruit. I know that it will be difficult to grow in a Long Island Climate but i'd like to give it a try. I was wondering when and how i should start to grow the seeds.
I was going to simply place them in a small pot with the Miracle-Gro Cactus, Palm and Citrus Soil bag mix. Would this be good to use?
Any other thoughts on this miracle grow mix?
Any other advice for growing citrus, as i would like to try a lemon tree as well.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Kumquat Growing

I believe that kumquats do come true from seed (meaning they can produce fruit from planted seeds). As containerized trees, kumquats are not difficult on LI or anywhere else for that matter. Not true citrus, Fortunella (their genus), includes varieties with rounded and oblong fruit. The oblong ones (Nagami variety) are the ones you generally see sold in fruit markets. Kumquats, as smaller, containerized plants/trees, offer several advantages over Citrus (relatively small size, fruit stays on the tree for long periods, more insect/pest resistant, drought tolerance, less prone to leaf drop, more tolerant of indoor life, and good cold resistance). Rather than being described as "difficult", kumquats are actually very EASY. I haven't grown them from seed but that shouldn't pose any special challenges either. Make sure you don't let the potting medium for the seeds dry out but don't saturate either. Fortunella and Citrus all like full sun. I like to start moving the adult tree out of their winter quarters (a chilly/cold garage) some time in March (watch the weather), usually by mid April I can relax about heavy frost. They stay out in full sun from then until the end of November. Right now they are actually in a period of setting heavy fruit. You mentioned lemons, I would suggest the Meyer's lemon as a great containerized plant. Kumquats also hybridize with true Citrus and these plants also make good container trees (limequat, Calamondin, and supposedly now lemonquat). Be warned, citrus can be highly addictive. Good luck!


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RE: Kumquat Growing

I have a Meiwa Kumquat (in my opinion the best tasting) and eat the fruit right off the bush and spit the seeds on the ground. In over ten years not a single seed voluntarily sprouted, and I must have spit thousands of them in my back yard. If you can grow one from seed please post how you did it. BTW, my Kumquat bush is now about five feet tall and wide, and makes hundreds of Kumquats a year. The main pest is scale insects, but I can't spray the tree because it is continuously producing fruit and I don't want any pesticides on it. If you eat too many kumquats at one time they will give you heartburn, so better to eat just two or three every time you walk past the bush while you are working in the yard.


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RE: Kumquat Growing

I have a kumquat that was from a seed from a yummy store bought fruit growing in Maine.

I have no idea what kind it is but I will say that its stem is wimpy. In FL at a nursery I asked about a heathy and sturdy kumquat that was loaded with fruit and the man told me it was growing on a graft root stock. It was in a 2 gal. pot.

Mine is about 8 years old. During winters when we traveled it and several citrus trees were in foster care. The kumquat was pruned a whole lot--a shocking amount to me, as the keeper thought it looked spindly.

Well, several years later I say it is still spindly even after growing a few new branches.

If you really want a nice citrus tree for an inside pot and do not really care about getting fruit, grapefruit trees are great. Mine just came from a nice tasting store bought fruit and the tree is pretty, strong and grows nicely.

Leasa
Eastport, ME


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RE: Kumquat Growing

Keep in mind it can take up to 15 years for a citrus to fruit from a seed.


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RE: Kumquat Growing

If I am not mistaken, the kumquat fruit we get at the store are from hybrid plants, so their seeds may not yield the same quality plant. Grafting will provide you with the same genetic tree. If anyone knows I am mistaken, please post information.

Mitch


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RE: Kumquat Growing

I dont think we really need to respond to this thread in 2011. This thread was last bumped in '09, so I doubt anyone is monitoring it anymore. :P

Still...

As noted above, the kind of Kumquat usually sold in stores is the Nagami variety, which does (usually) come true from seed. Most citrus can come true from seed, including hybrids, though there are some exceptions. In fact, most common citrus (grapefruit, orange, lemon, lime) are believed to be ancient hybrids of older species like citron and papeada.

That said, Mitch is correct that grafting is the best way to be 100% certain that you will get the same genetic plant, and is by far the best choice if you want fruit from your plants due to citrus species' long juvenility.


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RE: Kumquat Growing

"If I am not mistaken, the kumquat fruit we get at the store are from hybrid plants, so their seeds may not yield the same quality plant. Grafting will provide you with the same genetic tree. If anyone knows I am mistaken, please post information"

You are mistaken

Here is a link that might be useful: mrtexas


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RE: Kumquat Growing

I have a 10 month old Meiwa kumquat tree from seed that is doing very well, I think. It is the only one with a robust trunk. The other two died one by drought and the light to close to the other. Both of the dead ones had lighter but not spindly stems. If other are growing kumquats from seed could you posts pictures and the age of the plant. I would like to get an idea of what really works. This is my Meiwa as of 1-8-13

Thanks Steve


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RE: Kumquat Growing

Does any one know what happened to mrtexas He seems to have just disappeared off the cyberspace.

KUMQUAT MEIWA 2012, 10-25 A photo KUMQUATMEIWA10-25-12A_zpsaa3f135e-1.jpg


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RE: Kumquat Growing

He's still around. Check the forum at citrus dot forumup dot org


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RE: Kumquat Growing

I have a Nagami Kumquat and the leaves are droopy. I just moved it to a sunnier spot and put it on a regular watering schedule. How long before my leaves perk back up? I haven't killed any plants in a long time and I don't want to start now!


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RE: Kumquat Growing

Rescueme, I live on Long Island, grow my meiwa kumquat tree in a western window, and I never put the tree outside at all! Love it!

Mary


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RE: Kumquat Growing

I live in PNW. The plants in the photo are Meiwa Kumquat grown from seeds. They are 6 weeks old. I tried two different methods. Immersed the seeds in warm water for two days and planted them. Other method straight into soil. I kept them near a heater. Started to get them germinated in 2 to 3 weeks time.


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RE: Kumquat Growing

I have concluded that growing from seed appears to work well. My friend and I started 8 Nagami kumquats, 8 sweet lee tangerines, and 6 Moro blood oranges. We have found that starting with sterile soil gets us going for the first 4 weeks, After 4 weeks we transfer the trees into their own pots with about 1/2 inch of the tap root exposed. This take care of damp off. We also use a hair dryer to aerate the roots. See pic below notice the space between the soil and the seed were the trunk starts

7 week old Nagami kumquat tree getting warm fresh oxogen to roots photo IMG_3618_1_zps3147d70f.jpg

At this time the tree are very vulnerable so we provide as much light and warmth to get them past their first 3 years. in the pic below you'll see broccoli growing under lights that provide heat to the Meiwa trees roots above.

4)---16 brocoli plant in 1 gal. cans under 8 lights of 650 lumens, Above, Meiwa kumquat tree's roots are warmed by lights to 85 deg. photo IMG_3691_zpsd744827b.jpg

As the trees, bushes, and plants constantly grow. They have to be shifted to new positions to get light. The next 3 pics. showing the plant shifting
1)--fig tree shading other in bucket photo IMG_3922_zpsc10db0bd.jpg
above shows the fig tree shading the citrus / fortunella / sweet-potato.
2)---fig tree with the pants / trees that it shaded photo IMG_3692_zps1d236d91.jpg
the citrus / fortunella / sweet-potato plants that were shaded.

3)---shaded plants moved to new bucket with out the fig tree photo IMG_3700_zps027016b9.jpg
the fig tree is in a window and the smaller plants above get their own bucket and light.

so Give it a try and start with a lot of seed including sacrificial citrus to learn for the kumquats to be successful. It is this stage you will learn what the trees need. My Meiwa from seed below at 1 year 1 month age.


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RE: Kumquat Growing

here is my nagami as of this entry

NAGAMI KUMQUAT FROM SEED photo nagamislices_zpsb62b7e27.jpg
POTTED NAGAMI KUMQUAT TREE GROWN FROM SEED

Here is a link that might be useful: http://s1094.photobucket.com/user/wreristhechimney/slideshow/fig8citrus 6-14-13

This post was edited by poncirusguy on Sun, Nov 3, 13 at 19:31


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RE: Kumquat Growing

Now you're digging up 2 year old threads to post the same damn pictures over and over again? Really?


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RE: Kumquat Growing

JoppaRich

YOU ARE WRONG

The rules state ,that I am to use existing threads rather than start new ones. Also others have responded with their own stories and pictures. furthermore this thread is
---------4YEARS OLD

Steve


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RE: Kumquat Growing

I too find your posts off-topic and redundant. Its not about forum rules or etiquette either, you do just seem to dig up old threads and post the exact same pictures over and over again. We get it. I'm really sorry, I try to stay positive and grateful for all the help on these forums (and YES the FIRST time you posted your carbon copy post I did find it interesting and insightful), but its getting annoying!

-Mike B


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RE: Kumquat Growing

I'll tone it down. My reason for old threads was to see what success others had after a few years from seed. I am finding that its not much. I mam going to refrain from refrain from answering question, but post if I have a problem. I really like picture over short descriptive writings. I however have my own thread on kumquats where i am keeping track of my own stuff good and bad. I will continue to use that. I do appreciate the advice as I am unable to tell that I am off track or topic line.

Steve


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RE: Kumquat Growing

Hi all, Hi Steve,

I let the Kumquat seeds I got go dry and lost them all. Nagami, I think. I am a calamondin grower but have been interested in Kumquat growing so I am searching all threads, new and old. MeyerMike got me started again a few years ago. Nice chap. Is he still here on the forum?

I am going to find some seeds as soon as I can find some.


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RE: Kumquat Growing

CalamondinKid

Meyer mike is very active on the citrus forum

I have done a lot of research on this suject and have a list of successes and failure to kumquat growing with descriptive pictures

Here is a link that might be useful: http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/citrus/msg0320572518736.html


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RE: Kumquat Growing

Hey Mike from good ole Mass!!!

Calamondinkid, how can I help you? Thanks for your kind word.

Mike:-)


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RE: Kumquat Growing

on kumquat growing by lean-to greenhouse and espalier training to the south wall. I have noticed that the sun rises north of east and sets north of west. The south side only get light when the sun crosses over the vertical of the east-west line. At my place in cincinnati that gives me 4 hour of sunlight in 15 hours day. I moved 15 espalier plants 13 days ago and they are doing very well. Keep your trees movable to catch the summer sun through out the day.

 photo 17f0712c-11f9-4ae7-a238-153f29ac3f69_zps41bf6a77.jpg
My 1 foot gutter knock out 1.5 hours of light leaving me with 2.5 hours of light.
Its things like this that often eat me up alive befor I figure it out


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RE: Kumquat Growing/ Transplanting

Hope someone can help. I have been putting off transplanting my Kumquat. This plant is picky, and drops all it's leaves if over watered in the winter; so I'm honestly scared to transplant, but I know I should. It's been in this pot for 7 years.
What kind of soil?
How much of the dirt it's growing in should I remove?
Anything I should add to the soil?
Thank you for your help, this is a really great tree; the fruit is seedless and so good, I don't want to mess it up.


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RE: Kumquat Growing

I would not change the soil any more than necessary to undue wrapped roots. I would go with a pot with a radius about 3 to 5 inch larger. I would also go with a depth from 5 to 8 inches deeper. As for soil, Quick draining, never soggy feeling. You live farther north, 'cold' than I do. Unless you have a greenhouse you must be very careful of root rot. Other wise I would re-pot as it is getting warm enough for the tree to stay outside. Let the tree adjust to root shock as it is in the shade outside getting use to direct sunlight.

Good luck

steve


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RE: Kumquat Growing

Hi, meiwa kumquat grown from seed. It's 5 month old & 11" tall.


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RE: Kumquat Growing

That is a very nice looking tree. I wish you well with it.

Steve


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RE: Kumquat Growing

Seedling


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RE: Kumquat Growing

Thanks Steve.

It has started branching a few days ago. Three little ones on top.


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