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Dwarf Nagami Kumquat Concerns

Posted by gynot SoCal (My Page) on
Sun, May 20, 12 at 15:21

I have a potted Dwarf Nagami Kumquat that I've had for about a year. When I first got it, it was bearing fruit. It was planted with a potting soil, I can't recall the brand. The pot is a 1/2 whiskey barrel. It's on the south side of my home here in SoCal and gets all sun most all day. Besides B12, when it was 1st transplanted, I've given it 1 Miracle-Grow citrus spike twice now. I water it every other day enough to the point where the soil is always moist, but not sopping. The pot/barrel is raised up on a few bricks to allow any extra water to drain through the bottom.

My concerns are that the leaves are losing color and some are dried. The other is that it's no longer producing. I had one years ago that seemed to produce quite a bit quite often.

I tested the soils N, P, K, and Ph with a rapidest kit from Luster Leaf. It showed a depletion of Nitrate and deficiency in Phosphate.

My question is how much should I add of each and how often? Would a mixed fertilizer be better than buying them separately? What brands should I look for at Lowes, HD or Armstrong? Lastly, should I water more often or less? Other advise?

Thanks for any help or suggestions?

Tony

Here is a link that might be useful: Kumquat Image


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Dwarf Nagami Kumquat Concerns

Well, first off, your fertilizing regime needs to be changed. Not nearly even close enough fertilizer for nitrogen-hungry citrus. You need to switch to a granular or liquid fertilizer especially formulated for citrus, and then fertilize every other month. I would go to Armstrong's and talk to them about the best fertilizer for your citrus. There are some great options there. You can see if they have Gro Power Citrus & Avocado Food, which is an excellent product. Also, be sure your potting mix is well draining. Check down 18" or so, to make sure water is not pooling at the bottom of your pot. Your soil looks awfully dense, so don't just think that checking a few inches down is sufficient. If the bottom of the pot is really wet, your citrus roots will eventually suffocate and rot. Next, make sure your tree is getting plenty of sunshine. It appears that your tree is in the shade in your photo. Citrus can tolerate some shade, but really need at least 6 hours of full sun to flower and fruit.

Patty S.


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RE: Dwarf Nagami Kumquat Concerns

Thank-you Patty. If drainage is a problem can I replant without further damage? Can I replant this time of year? If I do go this route in addition to a good fertilizer what would you recommend as far as a soil mixture in the 1/2 barrel that you see?


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RE: Dwarf Nagami Kumquat Concerns

Slightly off topic, but you can go ahead and remove that stake. I would only keep the tree staked up for a little while after transplanting it into the gritty mix, and that's only if it REALLY needed it. Better yet try 'guying' it, like so: (Credit for this pic goes to Al / Tapla, I tried but couldn't find a better example!)

Photobucket


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RE: Dwarf Nagami Kumquat Concerns

Less water would probably be better. Kumquats need high heat to produce blooms and fruit, so the weather may be to blame for the reduced fruit production.

Here is a link that might be useful: My little kumquat


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RE: Dwarf Nagami Kumquat Concerns

Hi all, Couldn't wait to post back with great news. My Kumquat is doing fantastic in the 1-1-1. Finally found the time and mixed up enough for the half whiskey barrel about 2 months ago. I've been using Pro-Tekt and Foliage-Pro since. The leaves are green with new shoots and flower buds everywhere. It looks like a brand new very healthy tree. The main trick that I did learn was to water like crazy in this heat we have. I love how what water it's doesn't need it let's go of rather than act like a sponge.

The other reason I posted back was to ask what type of organic fertilizer I could switch to.? I'm also interested in one that's time released. Any recommendations for one that would work good in the 1-1-1?

Thanks so much for recommending the Gritty, now I want to use it in all my pots.

This post was edited by gynot on Wed, Jun 12, 13 at 22:36


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RE: Dwarf Nagami Kumquat Concerns

gynot

Could you post a couple of pics. I would ;like to see it.

The link below shows pictures of my potted seed grown meiwa kumquat tree

Steve

Here is a link that might be useful: https://plus.google.com/photos/111099372377958308731/albums/profile?banner=pwa


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RE: Dwarf Nagami Kumquat Concerns

Steve, no problem, click on the images below.

I wish I could find the before's. As I recall leaves were dropping like crazy and there were no buds at all. The soil was basically smothering the roots. When I replanted I had to rinse it all away including chunks of packed in soil. It wouldn't have survived much longer.

For just 2 months in this mix I'm really impressed and happy that it's come back to life. The only thing I need to stay on top of is mixing the Gritty as the wood chips tend to come to the top after a while. In a year from now I hope it has twice the buds.

Just as a note, while I was initially inquiring about the Gritty Mix someone mentioned Ultrasol K Plus (13.7-0-46.3), which I picked up. Not sure if I'm mixing it up with another plant or tree, but would this work well in the Gritty for my Kumquat? I know that it's not organic, but If I can use it, how much and how often?

Thanks


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RE: Dwarf Nagami Kumquat Concerns

I don't know about gritty mix. Since I plant to have my trees in 60" boxes, the gritty mix is out of my price range. It would be best for me to learn now what works that is free.

Here is the formula for my fortunella formula.

My homemade soil mix drains very well and uses no purchased materials. I use rotted leaves from compost and rotted wood from hollow trees for the bulk I add a substantial amount of river bank soil for the Teays river valley, but any river will do. Small amount of hard pan clay for nutrients. Crushed brick shards from 1/4 inch to 3/4 inch. Experiment with you own mix.

The link below shows how to grow a meiwa tree on its own root successfully. If you can grow an own roots meiwa you can grow any citrus tree

Here is a link that might be useful: http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/citrus/msg0320572518736.html


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