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Successful bud graft pic

Posted by dave_in_nova VA zone 7a (My Page) on
Tue, Aug 6, 13 at 19:17

This is a bud graft of the Northern Virginia mystery Citrandarin (possibly US 852 Citrandarin) that I grafted onto my 14-foot citrumelo tree. It's making some progress. Hope it can harden off by Fall.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Successful bud graft pic

Awesome! I hope you can produce a lot of them.


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RE: Successful bud graft pic

How in the world did you do that Dave???

Great work..Very proud on one that can accomplish a feat like this. Just amazing:-)

MIke


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RE: Successful bud graft pic

Well done, Dave. Let us know how this progresses.

Patty S.


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RE: Successful bud graft pic

Dave, looks great! How are the rooted cuttings working? If I were to ever try one here, I would have to go w/ a rooted cutting from mature budwood. I don't have space to let a seedling grow out to maturity and being in a 6b/borderline 7a area I would likely have to contend with the potential for significant die back in cold years.


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RE: Successful bud graft pic

Thanks all.

Mike: So far I had only one of ten bud grafts sprout on me.

Scott: I also have five rooted cuttings that I'll be growing up in pots for a few years before I plant them out. I'm a little concerned about the dieback on this bud graft shoot, so I have the rooted cuttings as a backup.


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RE: Successful bud graft pic

  • Posted by mksmth oklahoma 7a (My Page) on
    Wed, Aug 7, 13 at 10:05

great job Dave. Congrats!

Mike


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RE: Successful bud graft pic

  • Posted by mksmth oklahoma 7a (My Page) on
    Wed, Aug 7, 13 at 10:06

Double post, sorry. its all gardenwebs fault.
Mike

This post was edited by mksmth on Wed, Aug 7, 13 at 10:07


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RE: Successful bud graft pic

Beautiful graft. it looks strong and healthy. Could you post pics as it goes into fall.

Good luck


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RE: Successful bud graft pic

Mike: Thanks!

Poncirusguy: I'll try to remember to document the progress.


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RE: Successful bud graft pic

From what I have read about grafting, they recommend harvesting the graft stock at a different time than is ideal for performing the graft...I think I recall when the sap is flowing back down and the bark will peel back easily? Maybe this is not the case when bud grafting. I have several types of citrus trees planted in my yard and would like to do some grafting. Is there a time of year here in SE Texas when I can cut a bud and insert immediately to the host tree? I would like to graft some buds from a blood orange and possibly a lime that has never fruited into an immature calamondin. The calamondin is probably eight feet tall but it's never bloomed and is still awfully thorny. It's my hope that I can get the lime and the blood orange to perform better on the calamondin roots.


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RE: Successful bud graft pic

johnorange,

HOpe someone from your region responds. YOu might be best to start a new thread with your question.

If I were to do this over again, I would harvest the scion budwood earlier -- well BEFORE the plants start their first flush of growth. Up here in the frigid Mid-Atlantic, this first flush is usually in May, so I would harvest the budwood about 3 or 4 weeks prior - early April maybe - and just keep it in the fridge.

This assures that you will find lots of good unsprouted buds to choose from - because once the trees flush, there aren't as many unsprouted buds to choose from. Then keep this budwood in the crisper of your fridge in a sealed plastic bag with some damp paper towels. I lightly sprayed them with a very weak bleach solution too. The wood should last up to two months in there.

Then as soon as your bark is slipping -- whenever that is in your climate, you'll have your good budwood supply ready to go.

Hindsight is 20/20. I guess that's how you learn. Nothing I read about budgrafting said anything about this!


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RE: Successful bud graft pic

Dave,

Just saw your grafted bud! How exciting and gratifying, to be able to produce such a nice and healthy graft. What I don't understand is where do you find the root stock? Can you use any plant? Please forgive my very stupid question, I'm really trying to learn. I know about grafting roses, but that is rose on a rose. My citrus are all in containers.

Thanks again, for any answers,

Soussan.


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RE: Successful bud graft pic

Soussan,

You can use any citrus for the rootstock. Or you can use hardy trifoliate - or any citrus-trifoliate hybrids.

I'm using citrumelo, which is a hybrid between hardy trifoliate and grapefruit. I have two in my yard and each are about 13 feet high. It has not bloomed or bore fruit yet and it's about 7 years old. Likely the fruit will not be very good, so I'm grafting better tasting varieties on to it.


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RE: Successful bud graft pic

Very nice work! Anything climate zone pushing with citrus is worthwhile work.

I have been wondering about cutting and budding dates as well.

The Citrus Clonal Protection Program cutting dates are Sept. 1 through Nov. 1st. (see link)

But I don't think bud grafting really begins till spring. So i guess budwood is kept in the fridge?

I have an overgrown mandarin (?) that produces poor fruit i want to completely work over this year.

Here is a link that might be useful: http://ccpp.ucr.edu/budwood/cutdates.php


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RE: Successful bud graft pic

dave_in_nova

It sounds like you are going to :top graft" I have never seen that can you explaine the process . I have a triple trunk poncirus trifoliata 3+ feet tall with about a 3 foot spreed I would like to graft nagami kumquat to it to serve as inter stock for my meiwa kumquats.

 photo IMG_4509_zps1376a293.jpg
Poncirus trifoliata to be grafted. Curently all my attepts have failed

Thank steve


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RE: Successful bud graft pic

yukkuri_kame:

I have no idea on dates for grafting in warmer zones. CAn't comment. Yes, budwood can be stored in the fridge for several months.

Steve:

I think you are refering to 'top working'? Officially, that is when you are completely reworking the tree top from one variety to another, so I guess I am not officially top-working as I want to preserve at least a few branches of the rootstock.

Anyway, in top working, there are numerous graft types that work -- including bark grafting, cleft grafting, and bud grafting.

That looks like a nice healthy trifoliate you have. I would wait until the branches are at least pencil thickness before grafting onto it.


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