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paul farges

Posted by granny216 wi (My Page) on
Fri, Feb 13, 09 at 14:37

I was trying to find more info on paul farges....i think it may get too large for me as I don't have a lot of space....i have just been searching and seems it gets to 30' or more? I was thinking of growing it up a lilac[my neighbor's] the lilac is about 2' from my lot line.....anyone with experience with PF? how similar is it in size to sweet autumn? thanks


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RE: paul farges

Don't grow it but have read enough about it that I personally think it would smother a lilac bush. COTW describes it as a vigorous hybrid of C. potaninii and vitalba and vitalba grows even more vigorously than sweet autumn clematis.

Here is a link that might be useful: Paul Farges


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RE: paul farges

I have Paul Farges and put it at the end of a long south facing fence, but it was planted on the north side of it. It does grow long and is vigorous, but to have the white booms in summer instead of late summer and fall is great.

I did decide to move it as it would have been better to plant in the center of this long fenceline, but the well head is there and that area is ever changing. I didn't get it moved, as I thought I needed the whole root and thought the root ran deep, but contrary to this belief they don't.
You may cut the roots of a clematis and it will still grow.

I was told this on Gardenbuddies. I thought maybe I had lost the plant but it kept on coming back even with a little amount of soil back on its exposed roots and a green sheet laid over it and watered regularly.

I have some seedlings that showed up last year. I read that they aren't suppose to self seed and grow. But I don't know when the germination period started. I just happened to notice something similar to a clematis growing so I let it stay.

It also self roots very well if the vines lay across the ground and gets moisture and part shade. But they are not prolific at all. Plus I usually cut back my vines, but part of them were on a tall arbor with a few other clems.
So the job didn't get completely done, yet I had no reason to worry about seeds sprouting all over as that was the info I got.

I don't regret Paul Farges 'Summer Snow', just needs to be planted next to a tree or telephone pole or fenceline, or just cut the plant back.


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RE: paul farges

I have two Paul Farges planted next to a gravel walk way as a ground cover. This will be the fourth summer. I love it! It's in an area that is kind of a throw away where I don't want to spend a lot of energy. I cut them back to 12o-18 inches in late winter and by the end of June the entire area will be a mass of green dusted with hundreds of white blossoms. I do periodically cut them back to keep them in their area (3x20). I always get compliments from people who stop by. Really a lot of bang for the buck. They could be used to grow up a tree or a fence but no bush or shrub will be able to complete. Absolutley the best ground cover clem in my opinion and I have several. Smmer Snow is aptly named!


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