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Seeking Salt Resistant Conifers

Posted by edlincoln 6A (My Page) on
Sat, Jan 25, 14 at 11:18

What conifers tolerate salt spray best?

They could be planted in sandy soil or compact clay soil. Zone 6A. Unfortunately, Austrian pines and Japanese Black Pines pines have disease problems in the area. North American natives preferred.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Seeking Salt Resistant Conifers

Pinus rigida. Make sure the seed is from coastal sources.

Resin


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RE: Seeking Salt Resistant Conifers

Good choice, but rather hard to find.


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RE: Seeking Salt Resistant Conifers

Go to the coastal pine barrens and collect your own seed? Easy to grow, and collecting your own ensures you are in complete control of the seed source.

Resin


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RE: Seeking Salt Resistant Conifers

My current plan is to plant some Blue Spruce this spring. (The Bristol County Soil Conservation Office sells them at their Spring plant sale). Then I'm going to plant some Pitch Pines this Fall. (Still looking for a good source for those...the Forest Service of the Tennessee Department of Agriculture sells them by mail order, but I'd prefer to find a good local source.)

Ideally I'd like to get a staggered double row of trees, with a row of Pitch Pines and a row of spruce.


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RE: Seeking Salt Resistant Conifers

blue spruce is a common term... to picea pungens ...

seedlings of pungens vary wildly.. from green to blue ...

so dont be surprised.. if some of them.. from the soil conservation district.. are not blue ...

if they are not blue.. they will never turn blue ... its genetic ... they cant change from one thing to another.. over age ...

this would only be an issue.. if you were collecting cultivars.. and had some expectation of color ...

talk with your soil conservation district if blue is imperative ...

ken


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RE: Seeking Salt Resistant Conifers

I like the blue color, but I also like a little genetic diversity in the local tree population.

Does Blue Spruce sound like a reasonable choice for a patch of dense clay soil in a coastal area with a lot of wind and beetles and a splattering of salt spray every couple years?

This post was edited by edlincoln on Tue, Mar 4, 14 at 14:23


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RE: Seeking Salt Resistant Conifers

i have no clue .. about the salt spray ...

but to insure you understand...

you are getting Picea pungens seedlings ...

you keep calling them BLUE spruce ... a common name..

they may or may not be blue ...

and there is nothing wrong with that.. as long as your expectations are set properly ...

IMHO ... clay is irrelevant to a tree ... its all about how you plant them in clay ... so as to provide drainage during the transplant recovery period... once established.. a tree can put its roots where it prefers them ... its usually us, who kill them thru improper planting ... and watering ...

since you are dealing with the soil conservation district.. what have they told you about your project??? ... they would be my prime source .. as they are local and supposedly knowledge about local conditions ...

ken


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RE: Seeking Salt Resistant Conifers

Blue Spruce isn't very salt tolerant. Coastal origins of White Spruce would be better, if you can find them.

Resin


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RE: Seeking Salt Resistant Conifers

in my climate this Pinus brutia var. pityus, Juniperus excelsa


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RE: Seeking Salt Resistant Conifers

White Spruce is more salt resistant then Blue Spruce? That was something I was trying to determine, and got a lot of mixed information. Which is better with wind and clay?

Will pinus brutia survive in Zone 6?

This post was edited by edlincoln on Thu, Mar 6, 14 at 16:03


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RE: Seeking Salt Resistant Conifers

Picea pungens is more salt resistant than Picea glauca.

tj

Here is a link that might be useful: One of many similar lists out there


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RE: Seeking Salt Resistant Conifers

"Will pinus brutia survive in Zone 6?"

No, it won't, zone 7 is its limit (and preferably zone 8); it also doesn't tolerate summer humid / wet conditions, being very much a dry-climate tree.

"Picea pungens is more salt resistant than Picea glauca"

Depends on the origin of the Picea glauca. Most sources aren't, but coastal sources from e.g. Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, etc., have proven very salt tolerant in tests. Sorry, can't find the reference - it was a study I saw a long time ago.

Resin


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RE: Seeking Salt Resistant Conifers

Pinus brutia var. pityus, withstands temperature drop to - 30C


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RE: Seeking Salt Resistant Conifers

"Pinus brutia var. pityus, withstands temperature drop to - 30C"

True, but remember, (a) -30°C can occur in a severe winter in zone 7 - there is a big difference between absolute minima (what kills plants) and average minima (what zone numbers are based on), and (b) there is a big difference between a brief -30 followed by warm sun the next day in a dry climate, and -30 during a long period staying sub-zero in a wetter climate where the coldness is kept by snow/ice.

Resin


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RE: Seeking Salt Resistant Conifers

Yes, I understand! in my climate-30C is rare and not prodozhitelno. I'm in zone 6


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