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Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) as a windbreak tree? Growth rate?

Posted by nick_b79 z4 MN (My Page) on
Mon, Jan 24, 11 at 20:44

I think I've figured out how to set up a small windbreak in my backyard despite the fact that there is a powerline running along our northern property line. In addition to several smaller conifers that don't grow more than 25 ft (juniper and Techny arborvitae) I think I can work in 3 full-sized evergreens without sacrificing space from my vegetable garden. Since my goal is to create as much of an edible landscape as possible, I was considering planting Korean pine since they will eventually produce pine nuts.

What I'm wondering is what kind of growth rate I could see from them here in south-central Minnesota (borderline zone 4/5 based on the past 10 years' winter lows). Where would you recommend sourcing the plants from that won't break the bank? Finally, I've seen one source state that these trees require a soil innoculant to improve growth rates. Is this true, or just a sales pitch? Thanks!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) as a windbreak tree? Growth r

The species will get to 90 or 100 feet...eventually... and would take 15-20 years to cone. Grafted cultivars like 'Silveray' or 'Morris Blue' will cone much earlier (mine is coning at 5 feet tall) and would be about 30 feet high and 10-15 feet wide in 25-30 years. If you get cultivars make sure to get different varieties to assure pollination in order to get the nuts.

tj


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RE: Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) as a windbreak tree? Growth r

That's the very best answer you're going to see, nick.

Best Regards,

Dax


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RE: Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) as a windbreak tree? Growth r

P. k. would be totally inappropriate under power lines ... maybe resin has some pics of an old growth P. k. forest ....

i would look into edible shrubs rather than trees or conifers ... for under power lines ...

whenever you are contemplating conifers [non-cultivar types] .. MOST have known annual growth rates.. and being trees ... they will continue at that growth rate.. for most of your life.. and maybe 100 years after .... most size estimates.. are at 10 years.. and are simply 10 times the annual growth rate ....

at the link it states: Large: > 12" (30cm) per yr, > 15' (4.5m) at 10 yrs

the >15 feet tells me at least 15 inches per year, and most likely greater than .... so.. way before you get to cone age.. the power company is coming to cut it down .....

at least if you went the juniper route.. you could make the gin to survive the deforestation of the power company cutting them down ... lol ..

why dont we start with giving us an idea of how big your yard is.. and how much space you have... my p.k. is about 15 feet tall.. and at least 8 to 10 feet wide ... and growing like a weed.. do you have that much footprint space????

good luck with your edible dreams....

ken

Here is a link that might be useful: search Pinus koraiensis


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