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Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Posted by Lou_Midlothian_Tx z8 DFW, Tx (My Page) on
Tue, Oct 18, 05 at 10:20

Does anyone have this growing in their yard? I'd like to know your experiences with this pine tree. I got several Italian Stone pines and will be planting them this weekend. You don't see many of pine trees in my area, i guess due to alkaline soil (there are limestone outcropping with clay soil). Apparently this pine can tolerate alkaline soil so I figured why not try it. I've seen the pictures of mature pinus pinea with the umbrella canopy and i thought it was cool. Of course it'd be a long while before that happens to mine! :)


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

I have some italian stone pines in new mexico z7. The soil is mainly clay and they just grow like grass. I dont do more than water them, no fertilizer no anything, I figured out they dont need it. mines are 9' by 6', having over 3' growth this year. Hope this helps

osprey


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

thanks osprey! Does it look like Christmas tree right now? Are the branches at the ground? How long have you had it and how big were they when you planted it?


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

It doesnt look like a xmas tree, it is more like a ball at this stage, flat top, the main tip is above the other b less thant 4 inch, very wide. It has very strong and large nedles and its dark green. It was 2 feet tall when I got it but I just didnt pay attention to it at the beginning so it didnt really grow for 3 years. However I have a dripping system since two or three years ago and it started to grow really fast. I havent cut any of its branches, so you dont see ground, very dense.

osprey


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

I have a number (say 7 to 10) in my yard, all volunteers from the neighbors. They can grow really fast when they're little, going from a couple of feet to 4 or 5 feet and a real trunk in a single season. The oldest plants in the neighboring landscape are about 20 years, and they aren't more than 20 feet tall. With great age, they are truly spectacular and picturesque, exactly the kiind of thing you want setting off your villa on the bluff overlooking the Mediterranean. I think the tallest I saw were on the order of 50 feet, with great age.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

I guess I won't live long enough to enjoy the pictureque of my italian stone pine, LOL! I like pine trees after having lived in Houston, texas where pine trees are common but those pine trees won't do well in the soil up here so I had to look for different pine species that can tolerate this type of soil. I just like saying "Italian stone pine". My dad's family is from Italy... I need to go there one day...


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Ive heard the Italian Stone Pines branches twist and turn as they grow and become brittle and more susceptible to breaking. Can anyone verify if this is true? How often would I need to trim this tree? The one growing in my back yard is very old and easily 40+ feet tall. One of the bigger branches just fell off one evening during a very light rain (it wasnt even windy). I need all the help I can get. Thank you.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

I'd say that's fairly unusual. I've never seen them shed big branches, though I'd guess a very heavy snowfall would do it.

Is there any possibility the branch might have been damaged in the past? (e.g. someone hanging a hammock from it before you acquired the tree)

Resin


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

I wonder if there are any wild populations
of stone pines as I would be interested to
find out about the wild population.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Stone pine branches decidely do not grow as nogreen suggests. As the tree gets larger, the branches grow outward more than the leader grows upwards. This accounts for the eventual umbrella shape. Even the buds at the end of a shoot show greater size in the lateral buds than the terminal, just the opposite of other pine species, and that pattern is consistent within the tree at all scales.
Berndoodle's report of volunteers is as far as I know the only report of natural regeneration in California, other than my recent post. There must be more -- any of you guys?


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Hi Torreya,

It's a bit difficult to decide if a population of Stone Pine is genuinely wild or not, as the species has been cultivated for its seeds for something like 6000 years.

The only countries where it seems to be genuinely native are Portugal and Spain (these are the only countries where its presumed natural dispersal agent, Azure-winged Magpie, occurs). The populations in France, Italy, Turkey, etc., are likely introduced, but that awaits confirmation from archaeological research.

One of the most widely cited likely native sites is the Coto Doana in southern Spain.

Resin


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

  • Posted by bboy z8 WA USA (My Page) on
    Tue, Dec 19, 06 at 22:45

I've seen heavy breakage from snow loads in previous years here. We just had another episode with lots of damage from snow, if later I notice some broken stone pines I will not be shocked.

The usually mild climate here seems to result in lots of trees and shrubs failing when what would be normal weather many other places makes one of its occasional visits.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Anyone know how hardy stone pine is? it grows
well here in Britian and it does cone as I was
given a cone from a tree growing in Cornwall.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Grows well in northeast England and southeast Scotland, to at least 56N. Mostly young ones (often ex-tabletop christmas trees), but there's some old ones at Thorntonloch near Dunbar (old enough to have been there in the 1962/63 winter, and also undamaged in '81/82). None in Denmark (zone 7, a very few favoured island spots zone 8a). I'd say hardy down to about -16 to -20C when with adult foliage; young plants with juvenile foliage are less hardy, probably not much below about -10C. Best considered zone 8b.

Resin


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Lou
I put this one in the ground after last Christmas @ Justin, TX (imagine that!!) north of Ft. Worth. I understand we may be on the edge of its hardiness. The ice storms may be our biggest threat.
J.D.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Looks happy there, just starting to produce its first adult foliage at the top.

What's happened to the lawn?? Someone spray it with herbicide? (also perhaps why those few shoots at the base of the pine are brown)

Resin


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Resin
I hadn't really noticed those brown shoots until I took the picture!! I wonder if I got some root stimulator on those boughs the last time. Maybe I've got a "cat problem" as discussed in another thread?!? The lawn is my dormant bermuda grass.

I put the little Abies numidica in the ground (background).


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

My dog ruined the pine tree so I had to take it out... :(


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

I've been longing (at times) to get another Labrador Retriever, then I remember the holes, trails, hair, ........ Besides, I can't stand having a dog that's smarter than me. ; )


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

The azure-wing magpie may not be as widespead as the Italian stone pine, but the plain old magpie --Pica pica -- sure is. In the south of France the pine spreads normally within the range of P. pica, even if not of the azure-wing. Unless there's a good reason to rule out P. pica as a stone pine disperser, I'll assume it can do the job.
It can just as well be argued that stone pine became dispersed by the azure-wing after being introduced into Spain and Portugal. Right? Or vice versa!


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Quote from Mirov, The Genus Pinus:

"After reviewing this problem thoroughly, Rikli, in his Pflanzenkleid der Mittelmeerlnder (1943) wrote that it was impossible to distinguish between the original locations and the secondary places in the area occupied at the present time. He proposed that its origin was in the western Mediterranean region and particularly on the Iberian Peninsula, where this pine is found in larger groves and at higher altitudes than anywhere else."

On top of this, places where it occurs east of Iberia are all coastal and close to long-established trade routes; only in Iberia does it occur well away from the coast

Resin


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

  • Posted by bboy z8 WA USA (My Page) on
    Wed, Dec 20, 06 at 21:18

So, perhaps a predominant percentage of Pinus pinea are propagated by Pica pica?

Colder winters scorch it here in USDA 8.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Rikli had little in the way of biological tools to work with. Perhaps a modern study of DNA rangewide would help solve the riddle.
Last time I looked, there was no definitive study of dispersers, unlike the situation with wingless-seeded pines elsewhere.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

"The azure-wing magpie may not be as widespead as the Italian stone pine, but the plain old magpie --Pica pica -- sure is"

Checked up - Common Magpies don't do any long-term seed hoarding; they only occasionally store a few items (typically carrion, not seeds) for short term storage.

If anything other than Azure-winged Magpie is dispersing the seed, a far more likely candidate is European Jay (Garrulus glandarius), which is a major acorn disperser.

Resin


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

  • Posted by bboy z8 WA USA (My Page) on
    Thu, Dec 21, 06 at 20:38

I wondered about that.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

If I "pinch" the new candles on side branches (pictured above), can I encourage upward growth without damaging the tree?


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Back to the dispersal problem......acorns, shmaycorns. Just because the European jay does oak dispersal does not implicate it in stone pine dispersal. There is a classic study of jays dispersing oaks in Holland -- I forget the author -- about 1960 or so, but until a particular bird (or mammal) is observed burying stone pine seeds and leading to germination we will not understand the tree's biology. Everywhere stone pine occurs it is within the range of the common magpie. That is suggestive. As for the habits of the magpie -- unless the short-term storage referred to was observed in depth within a stone pine area, it says little about the possible interaction of this bird and this pine. I seem to remember an Italian paper on the pine and a magpie, but no longer have it and cannot recall its findings. That might be a place to search.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

"Everywhere stone pine occurs it is within the range of the common magpie"

Ditto, European Jay

Resin


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

I recently received a pinus pinea as a gift. I feel kinda sorry for the poor tree as it is covered in glitter. Will this hurt it in anyway? Also, I live in Canada where our winters can be fairly severe? Any tips on when or where to plant it?


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

  • Posted by bboy z8 WA USA (My Page) on
    Sat, Dec 23, 06 at 14:18

The little fluffy blue "spruce" is made up of juvenile (seedling) foliage that will soon be replaced by longer, more slender green adult needles. The glitter will go with the juvenile leaves.

If you are not in SW (Coastal) BC it will not live outdoors.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

I live in Southern Ontario, near Niagara Falls. Recently our winters have been mild (well, for us at least) but we have been known to get some serious cold spells. If I can't plant it outdoors, will it just grow to the size of it's environment if planted indoors?


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

In Spring 2005, I planted a Stone Pine from seed. It amazing how the little seedling pulls itself out from the seed shell.

My plant is about 18-month now, it is still in a 1-liter bottle. It's about a foot tall (30 cm), with mostly juvenile leaves, with 2 or 3 adult 2-needle bunches. The branches spread out like a candelabra, sort of like the picture from justintx.

All the young trees have branches fairly close the ground. When the trees get older, where do all these branches go? Do the trees grow taller between the ground and the lowest branches? Or do the low branches break off?

Here is a link that might be useful: my stone pine


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Bigoudee, the lower branches will die and eventually break off at the trunk ("natural pruning"). No, nothing will move upwards. The tree increases height entirely by adding new growth at the top. The crown moves "upwards" by adding at the top while losing at the base.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Hi to whomever is interested in Italian Stone Pines.

I have a property in Saratoga, California, with a knoll with approximately ten HUGE Italian Stone Pines on it. They are at least l00 feet tall. My brother did some research on our property for a paper in high school (that was 40 years ago) and learned that the trees were planted by Henry Farr, a rancher, who supposedly traveled to Italy in the late l800's and brought back the seed and planted them. The branches die off as they grow, so that eventually they look sort of like an umbrella. They canopy the entire knoll, and are absolutely stunning. There are a few smaller trees around the valley (Silicon Valley), we assume from these seeds. I am thinking these might be the original trees brought to the
United States, and am wondering if anyone has any, or has seen any, that are taller. You have to plant them from seed, as they have a very long tap root, even as tiny babies. We have never been able to successfully transplant them. I would be interested in hearing back from anyone who knows if there is a grouping of these trees anywhere else.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Hi Lynne,

Can you provide pictures of those trees? I'd love to see them!


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

It would be interesting to know their ages. The UC extension service may have an office nearby, and possibly a forester who could come over to measure and age the trees. They do sound spectacular.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

llynne1031 I'm looking for Mature Budwood for the Italian Stone Pine. I have a young tree. After buying it I found out that it may take 15 years or more to produce Pine Nuts.
I'm 59 so I need a mature scion to speed up things.
tripler(at)gmail.com
Terry


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

I have a ten year old "live Christmas tree" in a container. About 2' high and 2' in deameter with a decidedly woody bark. Coastal southern California. What is the potential growth if I plant it after all this time?


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

These do well in Albuqerque, NM (7b). Arid climate here. There are at least 3 big ones that I know of within 3 miles of me.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

teddyscan: According to most sources I've seen, you can't transplant stone pines after they're two years old very well. They'll partially wilt, then regenerate if you did it carefully, but they'll never grow big.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Hello,There is an amazing Pinus pinea growing at Kew Gardens,London England.I think it was planted around 1850 after having been kept in a pot for some time.Must have experienced some pretty severe winters over that period of time! PS : There is a picture of it on their Web site
Greetings.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

No, tunilla, not really. It depends how you define "severe" but they haven't been very severe in terms of testing Pinus pinea. A Pinus pinea survived near 0F (-18C) at the NCSU arboretum in North Carolina some 20 or so years ago. OTOH, IIRC, the lowest temp. recorded in modern history in London was 9F (-13C), in one of the great freezes of the late 19th century. Even when it's cold in Western Europe, it's not really THAT cold LOL. Didn't the Dutch canals freeze about 3 or so years ago? They held ice skating events? I bet it still never went below 12F during that freeze in "Nederland".

Holm Oaks have been naturalized in SE Great Britain since the 16th century. Those trees fair very poorly when temperatures drop significantly below 0F. Therefore its safe to assume such temperatures, which would also damage Pinus pinea, have never occurred in that part of the British Isles. (or in most inhabited parts, period. There are huge holm oaks as far north as Scotland.)


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Can anyone offer a resource for Stone Pine trees?
I would appreciate any suggestions you might have.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

You can get it online at Forest Farm.

Here is a link that might be useful: Forest Farm


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Hey, folks!
I have a tree in my backyard that needs ID.
It was labeled as a "spruce," due no doubt to the small, blue, juvenile foliage. However, I think it's a stone pine. Of course, I've been wrong many times before. Thanks for any help!


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Yep, that's a Stone Pine. Looks like it is doing well.

Resin


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Thanks for the confirmation, Resin!
It was doing even better...but it was blown over in a storm last year.
There was some root-loss, and the growth seemed a bit slow while the roots
re-established themselves. Now it seems to have resumed normal growth.

Josh


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

I am looking to BUY Pinus Pinea - Italian Stone Pine shoots, seedlings or small trees up to 1 foot tall maybe 2 foot, that would be shippable to South Carolina. I will buy up to 100 of them, perhaps more if price is right. Please offer.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

For that kind of order, you'd be better off contacting a local nursery.
There are many plantsmen here, but they might not be in your neck of the woods.

Josh


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Hellow I am a Newby posting here for the first time. I am from Leander TX which is just 25 miles NW of Austin TX. The soil in my yard is only 12" deep and is mostly caliche on top of a solid limestone bedroock with a PH between 8 and 8.5

I have the following pines growing directly in this soil (with no special considerations except whatever water mother nature provides):

Italian Stone Pine
Aleppo Pine
Afghan Pine

However I will say that they are planted in an area of my yard where the rains drain out and it tends to stay a bit more moist, so I suppose the PH may be a little lower there (but still very alkaline). I have seen these pines do quite well all around the Austin metro area....So I see no reason why you should have any issues with those pine in your area.

- Matt


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

I have two issues:

1. I am looking to buy Pinus pinea (Italian stone pine) trees 1 ft. to 5 ft. tall to be shipped to South Carolina. I will buy up to 100 trees or even more. Where can I find them?

2. How do I "shape/prune" a pine tree to have a wider form and a shorter height and to have a more umbrella-like (or other beautiful) appearance just like an Italian stone pine or Japanese umbrella pine? My pines are regular pines and I begin shaping them after they are 4+ years old and at least 7-8 ft. tall. So far I was snapping the new growth on top of the pines and their heads densed a bit for the last several months only been doing this. How do I make them more umbrella grotesque interesting shapes?


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

I just found one italian stone pine shoot bitten off lying on its side in the pot in my sunroom. It is an enclosed room, not the outdoors, although it may have small holes for small insects to get in, but most insects can't get in or get out. Once I found a geico in the sunroom, took him outside. He probably got in when the door was left open. My question would be - what bit the I.S. Pine shoot off in an enclosed room? A cockroach? Geico? Those tiny flying flies that the room is full of and hard to get rid of them?


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

neonrider, I had small catepillars attack my conifer seedlings this past spring in pots. Would lose one or two in a pot seemingly overnite. A lite sprinkling of Sevin dust put an end to it. They would be in my pot and unless one thoroughly searched the pot even turning over mulch it was easy to miss them. Sounds like you had a cutworm attack and he may still be in your pot.
These trees are often available at Lowes/Home Depot around Christmas as little potted living Christmas trees.

jeskim, you are in an area that is very marginal for Afghan Pine. Typically they do well for a few years then begin to succumb to a fungus. They do much better west of Hwy. 281 where rainfall is ~24" or less. Would not plant them here period. In any case you should never ever water them ever. The other pines seem to do ok as far as I know.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Somebody gave me an italian stone pine last year, it was no more than 7 inches tall, I kept it indoors in the winter and outdoors during the summer. It is now 18 inches tall. I live in Santa Fe NM do i have any chance of being able to plant it outdoors when it gets bigger?
Thanks


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

I have an Italian Stone Pine growing at my parents' home in New Jersey. Coldest temp since its been in the ground (more than 10 years) has been about 1 degree Fahrenheit (-17 degrees Celsius). The foliage does brown in many winters but hasn't had serious branch damage, and it bounces back fast in the Spring. Its on the south side of the house so that probably helps ;-)


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Hmmm looks a nice pine! Im sure theres a few growing over here.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

I bought one of these 2-3 years ago in a pot at Home Depot for Christmas. It was very neglected for several months and the inside branches all turned brown. It has a lot of new growth at the top and on the ends of the brown branches -- is there a way to help it be pretty again, something to do about all the brown branches?


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

  • Posted by botann z8 SEof Seattle (My Page) on
    Sun, Jan 16, 11 at 8:30

Were the pines I saw growing along the southern Spanish coast Italian Stone Pines? If so, none were anywhere near 100ft. (30 meters) Not even half that. I rented a car and went from Malaga to the Rock of Gibralter and back in the year 2000 and took a week doing it. From there, I took trains all the way to Waterloo Station in London. What fun!

Sometimes we have wet, heavy snows and ice that damages trees that aren't genetically set up for it. Italian Stone Pines would seem to be particularly vulnerable in that regard. So are Cedrus Atlanticas. They get big enough here to catch more weight than they can carry and large limbs rip off from the trunk. Guess I'll have to pass on growing an Italian Stone pine. :-(
Mike

Here is a link that might be useful: My garden


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

"Were the pines I saw growing along the southern Spanish coast Italian Stone Pines?"

They could be either Stone Pine Pinus pinea or Aleppo Pine Pinus halepensis; both are abundant in the area. Maybe also some Maritime Pine Pinus pinaster, and other cultivated species like Canary Island Pine Pinus canariensis or Monterey Pine Pinus radiata. Any photos?

Resin


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

  • Posted by dis_ z9 CA (My Page) on
    Sun, Jan 30, 11 at 17:44

I just stuck a tabletop Christmas stone pine out in the backyard. It never looked bad when it was in the house. It was even starting new branches. Once in the ground it starting making pretty blue-silver needles at the branch tips. I think it likes it's new home.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)--help!

Here in San Diego, there is a main avenue a block from the beach that is lined with beautiful Italian Stone Pines, planted in about 1930. The umbrellas are full and lovely and they stand about two stories high.

Question: I know there are no crystal balls, especially with non-native trees, but I am trying to decide whether or not to buy a condo that overlooks these lovely trees. The issue is that there is also a nice view over the tops of the trees, but if the trees grow two feet taller, that view will be obstructed. My questions: Does any one have any sense of how much taller these 80-year old trees will likely grow? How old do these trees typically get? Again, I am trying to assess likelihood as I know no one knows for sure.

Thank you for opinions--all are welcomed! (I'm happy to post photos if someone can teach me how--I don't see a link for jpegs here)

Thanks so much!


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Hmmm . . . I'd say your view will be blocked in about 5, maybe 10, years.

They can live to be a lot older than 80 years.

Resin


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Thank you, pineresin. I've found two sites on the Internet that say these trees will seldom live past 100--what do you think? (In truth, I'm thinking of buying this condo as a retirement home, so I wouldn't be there for another 20 years anyway.) Again, thank you.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Possibly they might not in an urban street situation like that, but they can certainly live well past 100. More like 200-250 years, where conditions are decent.

Seen some huge old specimens in Italy with a trunk diameter of 1.5m, and around 25m tall.

Resin


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Makes a lot of sense. Thanks!!


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Wasn't expecting to find one in Cincinnati, OH, but here is a Pinus pinea planted in 1938, so it's experienced some absolutely brutal winters, which is probably the reason why it does not have the typical shape.
Tree in center of picture.
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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

"probably the reason why it does not have the typical shape"

Actually, the reason it doesn't have the typical shape, is because it is Pinus nigra, not Pinus pinea ;-)

Resin


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Hey Jake; I haven't heard from you in years!


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Resin - I'll inform the arboretum that it is misidentified. I've never seen such a stunted 73 year old Pinus nigra in this area before considering that they are everywhere, that's why I didn't think it wasn't what it was labeled as. It's possible the pinea planted back in 1938 died and this is a nigra seedling that came up near the original pinea.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

"It's possible the pinea planted back in 1938 died and this is a nigra seedling that came up near the original pinea"

That sounds very plausible; I'd agree it looks rather less than 73 years old, more like 50-ish from a rough attempt at a whorl count.

Resin


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

does anyone know where i can buy a small stone pine or seeds


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

sherloc,

You can get seeds from various websites such as Amazon, Treehelp, etc.

Small trees can be purchased from Forest Farm website.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Hello everyone! i live in Paphos, Cyprus, where it rarely gets below 0 degrees Celsius. I collected 3 pine cones from 3 different stone pine trees here, and placed the seeds without any other treatment, in peat moss, and covered them with a wet potato sack. I left the tray outdoors (here it's currently 25 degrees Celsius!) and surprisingly they ALL survived - all 90 of them! now i transferred them to bags, as soon as they sprouted. I planted the seeds at the beginning of October 2012, and the plants started emerging two weeks later.

I suppose i will plant a forest!


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Hi again. The majority of stone pines i planted last year (October 2012) survived, around 70 plants. The rest died from dry weather. Now they are at a height of around 30-40 cm, and one of them developed adult foliage! I transplanted 5 of them to 20-30 lt pots. I keep them in a partly shaded place (near a pomegranate tree) which helps them withstand the dry hot weather here. The roots have just reached the bottom of the pot (around 20 cm deep), so i guess the best time to transplant them is now, up to next winter.

Last January when i decided to transplant the seedlings to the pots i collected topsoil from under a mulberry tree, and worked just fine.

This post was edited by paphian on Sat, Jan 4, 14 at 2:41


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

Hello everyone!

I read this thread and other websites about Italian Stone Pine, talked to the local nurseries people, but I get lots of confusing information and don't know what to do.

I have a 14.5 in tree in a pot, probably 1 year old. I wonder how old the pine should be to be planted in the ground safely, for how long can I keep it in the pot without hurting it (some people say not too long, some say keep it, no problem) and what is the best time of the year to plant it. I live in San Antonio, TX.

I would be grateful for an advice from people experienced in growing them.


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RE: Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

IIRC someone once posted a picture here of one planted in central TX that looked good.
I would plant it now if you have a permanent spot for it.


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