Return to the Conifers Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Posted by greatplainsturf 6/7 OK (My Page) on
Mon, Nov 21, 11 at 20:29

I've seen many threads in the past talking about growing firs outside their normal range. At the local nursery this week and I noticed a bunch of abies nordmanniana. I know that abies firma is a popular choice for heat tolerance. abies concolor also has some heat tolerance. How to these 3 compare and what others are there? I'm only interested in trees I can get, I don't want to search the world for some extremely rare species. With so many nordmanniana at the nursery, someone here must be growing them. I'm sure nothing including firma will grow well in the open sun here in OK, but with some shade, will they perform, or are they a total waste of time?


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Give them a try; make sure they are on their own roots, not grafted on rootstocks of a cold-climate species like A. fraseri.

If you can find them, also look out for Abies pinsapo, A. recurvata, and A. chensiensis.

Resin


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

A. firma is the most resistant to rot, which is caused by wetness & warmth. That's why it can grow in north Florida. In OK, with the dry summers you've been having, getting enough water to the thing might be more of the challenge. Therefore I wonder if A. pinsapo (or even A. numidica/A. cilicica, etc...the other warm climate Mediterranean firs) would be more dry-summer tolerant. OTOH, A. recurvata comes from wet summer China but hasn't seemed too thirsty for me. Still this is a much moister climate than the lower great plains, so YMMV on that. A. firma is in the same series...all of which seem pretty tough...A. pindrow survived this summer, with the hottest July ever, while A. spectabilis died in the almost-as-hot summer 2010, even though it was grafted onto A. firma.

So, yeah, definitely try A. firma but recognize it might not be the most drought tolerant. In OK I wouldn't have high hopes the Nordmann fir, the area it comes from is just too salubrious in my opinion. There are just a few old ones in the cooler parts of the NC Piedmont, unlike A firma that goes all the way down to the Gulf Coast.


 o
btw

With so many nordmanniana at the nursery, someone here must be growing them.

Don't count on it.
If it were a specially selected local strain, or derived from Turkish sources, maybe. I'd still take an A. firma, A. pinsapo, and one other Mediterranean/Middle Eastern species over the "standard" Nordmann from the rather rainy, cool summer Caucasian mountains.

Nowadays even the "better" nurseries sell plants that they shouldn't, in my opinion.


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Abies nordmanniana will grow there. /Mark/texjagman/ in or near Oklahoma City has commented about them being typical landscape specimens. I'll link you below to a thread.

Dax

Here is a link that might be useful: Mark's Comment


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Dax...did your Abies nordmanniana posted in the link survive this summer?

Dave


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

oh yeah. I have many-many seedlings of nordmann here.

Dax


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

I have a nordmann growing here in Nashville for many years now. It has come through very hot humid summers and drought. Looks perfect and is my favorite conifer in the yard. The only other fir I've managed to grow is firma. I got this one from Forest Farm.


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Thanks. It's good to know the Nordmann fir is heat tolerant. It still wouldn't be my first choice for a place like OK though. And as for texjagman's post, he said one "Golden Spreader" died on him, and that he sees other Nordmanns with light green growth but didn't make it clear whether they were mature landscape specimens or not.

I think there's a mindset difference here...I suspect in the south-central plains it's common to have irrigated lawns and gardens. I only water newly established plants just enough to keep them from dying. So in a hot dry climate I might prefer to plant a very drought tolerant fir. If you have sprinklers and everything gets watered anyhow, I guess establishing a variety of firs would be easier.


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Golden Spreader is a difficult plant and what it was grafted on is going to be strictly luck.

For a few bucks this person will know. Well worth the experience. Whether or not a perfect distinction can be drawn about the size of the nordmann's Mark is seeing is not 100% possible but one would draw that him seeing them is more to favor the likelihood that that he's not seeing little seedlings about but rather those that are at least recognizable from a distance. That's a decent bet I'm led to believe. Furthermore, I'm not watering mine at all. Only been in the ground since 08 - and I lost none this year with 6-8 weeks of blinding temps and combined with drought. I have 25 of them.

Dax


 o
Golden Spreader

Why has Golden Spreader been a difficult plant for me? It's the only conifer the damn rabbits (aka, the lop-eared rats!) have started eating! Had to put a fence around it! At least, I'm pretty sure it's rabbits, looks more like their handiwork than the deer. If anything because the bites are small and the remains mostly gone, i.e. consumed. I've almost never seen the stupid deer actually "eat" something. They just "sample" a plant by chewing 1/2 of the stems off and leaving them on the ground. They remind me of the parrot my family used to have that would "eat" fresh fruit by taking a 3X3 millimeter sliver of a piece of it, and slinging the other 98% of the mass across the room!


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Little brains.

Dax


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

I would not get a grafted fir unless the understock is firma for a hot climate. This is very unlikely unless the grower is in a southern area or bragging out it. For a species I like nordmann from my experience. Much more attractive than firma. I've also seen numidica do well in hot areas but mine died. There are a few firs in southern europe that may do well and some natural hybrids with nordmann.


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

I am in a hot and dry Z6--right next to Z7, and maybe properly in Z7, except for cold winter nights.

Anyway, here the best growing fir is holophylla--the 80 year-old specimens at the VA Arboretum are absolutely spectacular. The Nordmanns there are growing well also. On my place I have Nordmanns, bournmullerana, holophylla, koreana, chensiensis, cilicica, cephalonica, and numidica. So far all are doing well. All are seedlings--not grafted on some rootstock unsuitalbe to our hot, dry summers.

The climate where a tree is native is not always a good guide to the kind of climate in which a tree may grow beautifully. Norway spruce is adaptable to climates much hotter and drier than their native climate. The best example is the Baldcypress, which grows in dry soils and much further north than any native baldcypress will be found.

I believe that many firs are very adaptable to much hotter and drier climates than their native environment. I also believe that many are more cold hardy than advertised.

--spruce


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

  • Posted by jolj 7b/8a-S.C.,USA (My Page) on
    Mon, Nov 28, 11 at 17:47

Do I understand you.
These firs will grow in zone7,8,9 with no problem.
Or no more then any other conifer.


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

jolj:

Did you adress this question to me

"Do I understand you.
These firs will grow in zone7,8,9 with no problem.
Or no more then any other conifer."

I'm not sure. I was discussing this topic posted by greatplainsturf, Z6 or 7, and in my post I said I was a near Z7, but technically in Z6. Many people will say there are no good firs for Z6 and Z7. I say "bunk."

As for Z8 and higher, I have my doubts.

As for other conifers, many pines are more heat tolerant than fir trees, but many firs, I think, are as, or more heat tolerant, than some of the spruces.

But, specifically, as for OK, Z6 or Z7, there is more severe daytime heat than here in VA, so I would not guarnatee success there with the firs I mentioned. But if they do well here, I think they would be worth a try.

--spruce


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Thanks Spruce

I don't know if any of these would work in full sun. Firma seems like the best bet, though it's absent from your list. I've never thought of holophylla though. Anyone know which of holophylla or firma is most tolerant to hot temps with wind and sun?


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Here are the Rushford groupings, from a message that fell off the end of the forum (via Resin):

Group 1 bracteata.
Group 2 alba, cephalonica, nordmanniana, borisii-regis, bornmuelleriana, nebrodensis, equi-trojani.
Group 3 pinsapo, numidica, cilicica, tazaotana, marocana
Group 4 firma, homolepis, recurvata, pindrow, gamblei, chensiensis, holophylla, beshanzuensis [kawakamii].
Group 5 amabilis, mariesii.
Group 6 spectabilis, densa, delavayi, forrestii, fabri, fargesii, squamata, chengii.
Group 7 sibirica, semenovii, nephrolepis, sachalinensis, veitchii, koreana, sikokiana, [kawakamii - moved to group 4], lasiocarpa, balsamea, fraseri.
Group 8 grandis, concolor, durangensis, coahuilensis, mexicana, guatemalensis.
Group 9 procera, magnifica.
Group 10 religiosa, vejari, hickelii, oaxacana.

Seems group 4 is the most (humid) heat tolerant overall. Abies recurvata and A. pindrow did great for me in this hot summer. Followed by 3, then, 2 or 8? The Nikko fir grows in NC.
My final word on the Nordmann fir is that if you search the archives of this forum, some have reportedly had difficulty with it in hot conditions. Sure, some collections are probably better than others but this looks a world away from OK over the past year:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Uzung%C3%B6l_lake_and_town.jpg

This looks more like it(!):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Abies_nebrodensis_Castellana_Sicula1.jpg


 o
ok, to make it simple

Very hot & very wet? (i.e., New Orleans) A. firma is your only choice.

Very hot and drought prone: sure try others, including A. equi-trojani (arguably the Turkish form of Nordmann...yes, it is more attractive than A. firma, generally speaking...if nothing else because it has fragrant foliage.)


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

I live in central Arkansas zone 7b with very hot and humid summers. I've had good luck with Abies pinsapo, concolor, and firma. Several Abies koreana have turned brown and died overnight. I've also tried Abies nordmanniana numerous times without success. I don't know what type of rootstock was used on my previous Abies nordmanniana 'Golden Spreader' attempts or Abies koreana cultivars. Most of my previous A. nordmanniana specimens would slowly die with branch dieback affecting different areas of the plant as each year passed. They definitely didn't thrive! I always removed them after about 3-4 years because they looked so ratty. In regard to sun/shade, moisture, wind protection, I've planted then im a lot of different areas. Nothing helped. I'll never attempt A. koreana again but maybe A. nordmanniana 'Golden Spreader'. It'll have to come from a dependable grower who can confirm Abies firma rootstock was used. If it doesn't survive, I'll then be done with A. nordmanniana.

My successful Abies pinsapo, concolor, and firma all receive early sun and evening shade. All my newly planted Abies receive full time shade (30-40% cloth)for the first 2 years then they're on their own. Is this necessary???...who knows? It works for me and I havnt lost one yet with this method. I repeat the procedure for all new Abies pinsapo, concolor, or firma planted.

I plan on trying Abies cephalonica this spring. I'm also planting 3-4 more Abies pinsapo and concolor specimens.


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Fir lovers:

My fir here that I mentioned are all seedlings. I am just a bit suspicious of rootstocks and don't want to plant any grafted fir. Of course, if you want a cultivar, it is had to find them grafted on the same species. Tough!

Also, one can't ignore soils. The firs I have growing here, and those at the VA Arboretum, are growing on very deep, rich soils. The rooting zone of most of my soils and those at the Arboretum is at least 50 inches, and in some cases over 60 inches. So if one person has bad luck, but another reports wonderful success in a zone with the same kind of climate, the difference may be soil.

--spruce


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

I know it's not a fir, but i didnt think there was need for a new thread. I saw a picture today of a picea omorika bruns and fell in love. How does this tree stack up in the heat compared to picea abies or pungens. I'd love to add on of these to my collection.


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

turf:

Best to start a new topic with this. From my limited observation, P. omorika, as a species, is not so heat or drought tolerant as P. abies or P. pungens. Norway spruce seems to me to be the best for warmer and drier climates, at least with the right strain, and the right soil (with good magnesium). But I have not seen very many older P. omorika in Z6 or Z7. When they are young, they look wonderful. But the very few older ones I have seen look a bit thin and sick to me in warmer and drier areas. But, again, I stress the importance of soils, and I have not seen any older P.omorika where I knew anything about the soils they were growing in.

I can say, almost for sure, that in Z6 and/or Z7, they will be slow growing. Actually, at my timberland in moist Z5, they grow slowly on most of the soils there that are relatively well-drained. I have two planted in a bottomland soil that is heavy, and waterlogged at depth. On this site they grow almost as fast as Norway spruce.

I have one weeping variety of P. Omorika growing at my timberland, but I am not sure it is a Bruns. It is very pretty, and quite narrow, and is growing fairly slowly.

Anyway, for a narrow upright weeping tree--not nearly narrow as the Bruns however, try some of the Norway spruce cultivars, such as 'Pruhoniceana', 'Rothenhaus', and 'Aarburg'. I am growing all of these. A real star in my book is the P orientalis 'Nutans.' P. orientlis is one of the more heat tolerant spruce, and this cultivar can become incredibly graceful, with just the right amount of irregularity. Of course, I am also growing those here in Northern VA.

Based on what I know--or think I know--about P. omorika in my climate here (a hot and dry Z6), and a comment or two from folks on this forum, I have passed on trying the Bruns here.

--spruce


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Spruce, I think that you mean 'Pendula Bruns' instead of 'Bruns', these are differend from eachother.
The first one is a narrow weeper while the second is like the species only more silvery blue...


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Coniferjoy:

Thanks, I carelessly thought I was using a short form of the name. But now that you mention it, I remember that 'Bruns' is another thing altogether. It never hurts to be careful with cultivar names!

--spruce


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Abies Concolor seems to be the native fir with the most heat tolerance. abciximab in arkansas says he is growing one. how does this one stack up compared to firma and nordman as well as picea pungens and picea abies? I love the long blue needles from recent posts on this forum.


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Abies concolor if sourced from the SW USA. We have many in New Mexico surviving in very xeric conditions with 15 inches of rainfall a year or less in bad years.


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Some but not all of my Picea omorika cultivars suffered some damage from the drought and high temps this last summer. I lost one 'Pendula' and others suffered more then normal needle cast. All established and in good health.

In my opinion not as durable as Picea abies or pungens.

Dave


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

I still think Nordmann fir can be a viable option. Hotter than heck in Nashville, Tennessee this summer and very dry in June. Many days over 100F. Then July was hot, wet and humid. This guy has been in the ground for 5 years now and is doing great.

Here is a link that might be useful: my nordmann fir


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

I can't see it and I really want to!


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

I've noticed that a lot of christmas tree farms around here (mind you, there aren't that many) are beginning to plant Canaan fir (Abies balsamea var. phanerolepis). I wonder if this is the most heat-tolerant of the balsam group? We have problems with root rot on frasers around here, and it's a bit too warm for Balsam. We are USDA zone 5 and AHS heat zone 5.

I've constantly been looking for a more heat tolerant eastern fir, wondering if there really is significant differences in geographic races. Would a balsam fir from Michigan or Wisconsin do better in Indiana than one from Nova Scotia? Provenance is something I've always been intrigued by. I grow a lot of Northern trees that wouldn't normally be found around here (Many are found in far Northern Indiana), often with success. I've found that, planted as a seedling, anyways, once a tree reaches head height, I consider it completely established. I've also noticed that trees from more Northern climes establish better and have a better chance of success if planted as a young seedling or even started from seed here. Maybe I'm crazy for thinking like that!

I've planted some Canaan fir seedlings this spring - Only 1 took. It's been a rough year that way... However, I plan to try more next year!


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Actually it's been a rough year all around. We are drought-free now - 1 inch below normal. (Actually, we made that up last night). We've had 12 inches of rain since August 1st! That's how our climate goes, though - Makes it seem worthwhile watering all those plants for three months. They're fine, now!


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Addressing Spruce's comments that where a tree grows natively is not always a reliable sign for where it will grow...balsam fir is a common "weed tree" just 50 miles north of where I live. In ditches, logging ruts, pretty much anywhere, it comes up thickly. Here in the woods, it is never found. Yet I see trees of this species, having undoubtedly been dug "up north", brought back and planted in yards, all with no difficulty. My take is that while conditions are suitable here for the species, in a forest setting, it gets outcompeted by other trees relentlessly, such that it is simply not a component. So a tree planted in a yard, where competitive factors are not in play, will do fine. Not directly a soils/climate thing, in this case.

+oM


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Since I was quoted again on this thread like I was one other time on this same subject let me qualify my comment I made in that thread.

I said I had a couple of them in my gardens but one had fried and one was doing well in a mostly shaded setting. I went on to say I see a lot of people with these that push more lime green rather than the cream color that was being shown in that thread. But I never said they were a good plant for this climate. Those varietals like many other conifers sold in our nurseries and planted all over the city don't survive long here....especially in the current heat cycle climate we're in the last couple of years.

Eventually my second 'Golden Spreader' also fried. As a varietal I would not try and grow them here even though they are seen in many nurseries. If you do they need to be set up under a drip irrigation system for the summer months and at least in a well dappled shade area if not full shade to survive here.

mark


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

THE MOST HEAT TOLERANT FIR IS BY MY LONG EXPERIENCE
ABIES PINSAPO. THIS IS FOR DRY HEAT.
IT CAN HANDLE TEMPS IN THE 100 - 105 RANGE WITH OCCASIONAL 110 FOR MONTHS AND STILL LOOK GREAT.
MOST OTHER FIRS THAT ARE CLAIMED TO HANDLE HIGH HEAT NEED HUMUDITY TO SUVIVE LONG TERM.
I HAVE TRIED MANY DIFFERENT FIRS THIS IS THE ONLY ONE THAT WILL LOOK HEALTHY AFTER A FEW YEARS.
IT MUST BE ON ITS OWN ROOTS, GRAFTED IT WILL GET SICK.


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Arawa, have you tried Abies cephalonica?? It should well in your zone and it looks to me that it is fa more drought tolerant. Today I saw one year old seedlings, very healthy that saw rain once in May, once in early September and nothing more. And they were at 3000 ft altitude, just over Athens which is zone 9 and barely touching zone 8b...

If you haven't you should try it. In 2 years I'll be able to send out some of my seedlings to anyone interested. Or in few days, fresh seeds worldwide.

Best regards,
Fotis


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Around here (Zone 5), I need a fir that can withstand the occasional heat spell. We tied some weather records - 7 days over 100, one day at 105. Mind you, we usually only have a week or two of 90s, broken by stretches of cooler 80s. And usually, the warmer it is, the more rain we get. This year has been anomalous from the norm. (understatement of the year)


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

I know this is an old thread but has anyone come up with a good guideline or is it really just too much of hit and miss? What # category have you found to be the most heat tolerant? I live in the high plains. 3000' alt., dry heat. Summers get hot, but nights tend to cool down nicely. We may have 100 to 105 for weeks in summer but our nights will cool down to less than 70 most of the time with some nights getting to low 60's or even upper 50's in late spring or early fall. I think this does tend to help plants cope a little bit. All of my plants are on a drip system so I really do control the moisture to them. Does anyone have any suggestions at all as to what they have tried? I have grown Abies koreana Cis for 2 years now and it looks great. I have had Abies koreana Green Carpet for a year and same there. My Abies nordmanniana ‘Golden Spreader’ is a year and a half and is thriving so far. My nordmanniana Berlin struggled some as the new growth burned off but I had it in a bad place and did not get enough water to it as it was new. We'll see how this summer goes. I have had Abies lasiocarpa var arizonica ‘Compacta’ for a year now and it is getting ready to bud out. What a nice blue color.


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Where exactly are you located?? It's not only heat what ends up killing firs....


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Western KS high plains.


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

You have a distinct advantage indeed living up in altitude and having cool nights. And conifers like soil that is on the moist side versus the dry side. There you have a given advantage too with your irrigation.

On their own roots you should try:
Abies firma
Abies nordmanniana
Abies bornmuelleriana (a sub-species of nordmanniana)
Abies homolepis
Abies holophylla
and I believe that Abies x phanerolepis is worth a shot.

And for other firs you wish to grow you will have to find growers that know their understocks. You should go with the flow of growers using Abies firma as rootstocks or find someone growing on Nordmann.

I was just reading about this, this morning. 'Landscaping with Conifers and Ginkgo For the Southeast'.
ISBN: 9780813042480

The authors talk about siting firs to keep them out of the blazing afternoon sun. This in conjunction with water and species-selection will take you a long way.

Dax


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Thanks. Sounds great but trying to find some of those seems to be difficult. I am looking for very small dwarf plants or even miniatures as my areas that I have are not big but I love to collect with well over 100 varieties to this point.


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Well, I'd recommend the obvious... you need to buddy up with a grafter. Look into Gee Farms & Western Evergreen and Coenosium Gardens. Each Fall early on Bob Fincham (Coenosium) takes special requests.

As of recently I've heard that Jason at Western Evergreen has something like an eight plant minimum for requests of (1) thing. That's an estimated guess though. You'd have to contact him to learn the real situation.

Gary Gee custom grafts but I don't know his policy.

Bob has always been easy to work with. It's been a few three years since I asked him for custom grafting, however...

Just trying to help you. I don't know what else to say.

Dax


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Thanks. I didn't know that was an option. I guess I learn something everyday on here. I will also keep looking. I have found some but just not many.


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Ingeborgdot, definitely try Mediterranean firs (Abies cephalonica, Abies cilicica, Abis pinsapo, Abies nebrodensis - if you can find seeds! -, Abies tazaotana, Abies numidica.

FW Schumacher and Sheffields are good vendors for seeds.

Here's a scientific comparison of the temperature and precipitation of the native habitats of Mediterranean firs:

http://utenvironment.org/upload_cec_files/abies_drought_comparison.pdf

Abies concolor should do even better than Abies lasiocarpa var. arizonica, since they're native to the same area but at lower elevation.

Here is a link that might be useful: Temperature and Precipitation comparison of the native habitats of Mediterranean firs


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

You need to be careful with A. firma rootstock in alkaline soil. A. nordmanniana does much better for me... the problem would be finding plants grafted onto A. nordmanniana.

bluecone, very interesting article!!!

osprey


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Wow. I haven't been on here for so long. I need to get back to the forum. I am in Nashville, TN USA. Here is a picture of my Nordmanniana grown from a 1 gal from Forest Farm. Sorry the pic is sideways! It has been in the ground for probably 7 years now. It has seen every summer Nashville could throw at it including 110F dry heat and 95F with unbearable humidity. I have not watered it a lot. Mostly just when we have an extended drought for a couple weeks I will give it a good drink. Side note as far as spruces, Norway, Colorado do fine, I also have a Chinese spruce that has done well. I would have to look it up to see what it was but it looks like Colorado but not quite as blue. Oriental spruce does well and is beautiful but grows slow. Get Serbian spruce grafted on Norway and they do better IMO. Serbian on its own roots has died for me while grafted varieties did fine. I can only assume they were grafted to Norway. Abies koreana I've killed but I have seen a few do OK around town. Must be grafted to firma.


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Has anyone tried A. homolepis in the Mid Atlantic? Seems similar to firma, hollophylla, etc.


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

  • Posted by beng z6 western MD (My Page) on
    Sun, May 11, 14 at 9:50

Hair, no, but got a A holophylla and A nordmanniana last spring. Holophylla looks good (buds sprouting) -- nordmanniana might not make it.


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

  • Posted by beng z6 western MD (My Page) on
    Sun, May 11, 14 at 9:57

midtn, nice Nordmann. I grew up at a house w/a 90 ft Nordmann. It was the only one I ever saw of any size other than in the DC arboretum (later I saw a few in the Va arb).

During the hottest, driest summer (with lawns browned-out), it would get a bit of spider-mite infestation low down, but nothing serious.


 o
RE: Most Heat Tolerant Firs

Beng, Nordmann pushes late, so you might be OK.

I have some hollophylla I am starting from seed. They are just 1" sprouts with cotyledon leaves so far, but a little bud is forming in the center of a few.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Conifers Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here