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Korean Fir

Posted by lil_rhody z6b RI coast (My Page) on
Sat, Dec 30, 06 at 19:09

I have a Korean Fir that is approx. 3' tall and very symetrical. I was told by the nursery owner that it will eventually (approx. 5 yrs.) bear purple / blue pincones.

Is this true, and does anyone have a photo to share of theirs w/ the colorful pinecones?

Paul


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RE: Korean Fir

  • Posted by cdjr z6 OH (My Page) on
    Sat, Dec 30, 06 at 19:58

I'm on my way out, but here is a quick picture I found. Hope it helps!

Here is a link that might be useful: Korean fir cones


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RE: Korean Fir

Yes, it will . . . except it will have fir cones, not pine cones . . . a fir with pine cones is like a cat having puppies :-)

Korean Fir cone:

Resin


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RE: Korean Fir

One of the joys of Spring for me.
Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Defianately something to look forward to. Dan


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RE: Korean Fir

  • Posted by basic z4A WI (My Page) on
    Sun, Dec 31, 06 at 11:21

I think the cones on Korean Fir and Oriental Spruce are incredibly ornamental. Is it true that as Firs mature the cones are concentrated almost exclusively near the top? If so, is it true of all Fir species? Also, can someone tell me what the term is for the rigid spike that runs the length of a fir cone? I thought these would fall off the tree shortly after the cones disintegrate, but here we are at the end of December and they're still standing erect. This is not one of the more ornamental features of the tree. Sorry for getting off topic.


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RE: Korean Fir

Hi Basic,

By and large, the cones (both firs and spruces) are concentrated around the top of the tree, primarily for increased seed dispersal efficiency, also because the top is less shaded than low branches, so more photosynthesis products available for production.

The cone rachis (there's your word!) of firs can be persistent for several years before slowly decaying and breaking up. It is particularly persistent on firs where the rachis is short and stout (e.g. A. forrestii), lasting up to 5-10 years; in firs where the cone rachis is slender (e.g. A. balsamea) it breaks up sooner (2-5 years).

Resin


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RE: Korean Fir

Dan,

Are those from your 'Aurea'?

Thanks,

Dax


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RE: Korean Fir

Yes, they are Dax. Dan


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RE: Korean Fir

I've been admiring the Korean Fir for the last year and am ready to purchase one--but have a few questions. First, are the pictures (above) of Abies Koreana 'Aurea?' Second, is the tree growing in full sun (I've seen a reference to 'Aurea' growing 'best' in partial shade)? Finally, where did you get the tree (local or online grower)?


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RE: Korean Fir

The cones of this fir are fascinating!!!
I know that grafted examples of fir's get their cones at a much earlier age than ones that come from seedlings.

I was wondering: At what age will a a Korea fir seedling have it's first cones? And at what age for a grafted example?


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RE: Korean Fir

"I was wondering: At what age will a a Korea fir seedling have it's first cones? And at what age for a grafted example?"

Seedlings about 10 years, grafted plants as little as 3-5 years (rarely less, but these cones tend not to develop well).

Resin


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RE: Korean Fir

I think the Korean Fir would be a beautiful centerpoint for my privacy border (most other evergreens will be 5-8' tall, so this would be the reigning royalty.) My official planting zone is 4, but I have some zone 5 trees doing just fine, and suspect I'm in a micro-zone 5. My question is, does anyone have any experience growing this fir tree in a borderline zone like mine?

Thanks for any info you can offer.
Hollyshome


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RE: Korean Fir

I suspect you'll be ok and I would go for it. My reference being Bickelhaupt Arboretum in Clinton, Iowa which calls their 'Heartland Conifer Collection' a zone 4 or 5. They have conifers in their collection ranging from zone 4 to zone 6. There are many korean firs in their mature collection.

Visit their website for a link to their entire database.

Dax


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RE: Korean Fir

  • Posted by basic z4A WI (My Page) on
    Tue, Jun 17, 08 at 19:37

Holly,

I've got two seedlings and a Horstman's Silberlocke that were planted 3-4 years ago. The two seedlings have experienced some minor winter burn, but all three are doing fine. Mine are in sandy, droughty soil and the bigger concern is they'll be short lived due to dry soil conditions. Certainly worth a try.

Bob


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RE: Korean Fir

Rice Creek Gardens, in Blaine, MN, (now closed) had a large Horstmann's Silberlocke planted in front of the nursery and it never winter burned, that I know of. Betty Ann said the tree had been there for about 20 years, so it had seen some pretty bad winters.
Mike
tl


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RE: Korean Fir

hollyshome... start your own post next time.. so the answers come to you ...

a plain old abies kor is NOT going to remain a small tree ... nor i suspect ... are the others you claim will only be 6 to 8 feet ....

research the latin names of each .... and find the estimated growth rates of your plants ... MOST listed heights are at 10 years ... year 11 .. they are ten plus the growth rate ...most they will continue at the growth rate for the rest of your life ...

after transplant.. by about the third year.. you will see the annual growth rate ...

i bring this up.. so that you can decide now.. while they are still small .. if perhaps you need to rethink some of your plantings ...

a plant like silberloche ... will not grow like the plain old green one.. it will be slower... a dwarf of the larger parent ... but it still might grow 6 to 12 inches a year.. depending on how happy it is ...

never trust labels.. and learn a lot more.. there are some great conifer tutorials and a good database at the American Conifer Society website..

ken


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