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Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Posted by midnightsmum 4b ON (My Page) on
Sun, Aug 26, 12 at 9:51

Well, the world lost a hero yesterday. Neil Armstrong died at age 82. Armstrong made his lunar landing on July 20, 1969 and uttered the famous quote: "That's one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind."

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Before Neil and his brethren could go to the moon to land, studies had to be made. A million details were checked, and another trip made, 46 years ago last week, no less. What was this journey, and who or what made it??

Nancy - who will be back for clues, if you guys need them.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Hmmmm, if I'm thinking in the right direction I may know the what but don't remember the who :(.

Annette


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

I'm looking for the name of the 'what'!

Nancy.


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Would this answer have a connection to Cynthia's question of yesterday?

TM


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

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First views of earth!!

Nancy.


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

I'm thinking the 'what' could be also called the dry run or... am I on the wrong track again.

Annette


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

As I said, I love everything about the space program. Unfortunately, I forget so much these days (no laughing, Nancy!). My head will soon be an empty vessel if this continues. Do you need really specific info? I am afraid generalities will be all I can offer.

Cynthia


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

I want "it's" name. It was named what it was.......

Nancy.


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Photobucket


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

I know that Armstrong was part of the G... series that performed the first docking procedure which was necessary for the moon mission. Then the A missions before 11 were basically practice missions for the moon landing.
Do you want something more specific?


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

So, if I am right, there is no 'who', but not sure of the name of the what. I have two thoughts, but your picture has me leaning toward something that relates to Armstrong's title on Apollo 11. I was also considering something with a planetary name.

Cynthia


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Lo, I recognize that machine! There were a series of trips to map details of the surface to choose the landing site. I don't remember percentages but most of the moon's surface was photographed during that series.


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Lo, I recognize that machine! There were a series of trips to map details of the surface to choose the landing site. I don't remember percentages but most of the moon's surface was photographed during that series.


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Lo, I recognize that machine! There were a series of trips to map details of the surface to choose the landing site. I don't remember percentages but most of the moon's surface was photographed during that series.


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Lo, I recognize that machine! There were a series of trips to map details of the surface to choose the landing site. I don't remember percentages but most of the moon's surface was photographed during that series.


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Lo, I recognize that machine! There were a series of trips to map details of the surface to choose the landing site. I don't remember percentages but most of the moon's surface was photographed during that series.


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Sorry for the multiple postings. I was surprised and pleased to remember the name, but not that much!


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Now I thinking about birds, warm or cold?

Annette who is scratching her head over this one, in other words me thinks I'm skunked.

Annette


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Well, it was designed primarily to photograph smooth areas of the lunar surface for selection and verification of safe landing sites for the Surveyor and Apollo missions. The bonus was the first grainy, B&W photos of Earth from space. It was also equipped to collect selenodetic, radiation intensity, and micrometeoroid impact data. That should be enough to get the scientists excited.....part of the name is up there, too!!! I don't even know what selenodetic means!!

Nancy.
Nancy - just a nod to Bobby.


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

TM - I'm not ignoring you - I just am not sure where you were going.....

Nancy.


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Well, bummer. No one got it, though I though Bobbie did?? I was going for Lunar Orbiter I. I must be the only one who reads this stuff in the Papers!!

The Lunar Orbiter program consisted of 5 Lunar Orbiters which returned photography of 99% of the surface of the Moon (near and far side) with resolution down to 1 meter. Altogether the Orbiters returned 2180 high resolution and 882 medium resolution frames. The micrometeoroid experiments recorded 22 impacts showing the average micrometeoroid flux near the Moon was about two orders of magnitude greater than in interplanetary space but slightly less than the near Earth environment. The radiation experiments confirmed that the design of Apollo hardware would protect the astronauts from average and greater-than-average short term exposure to solar particle events. The use of Lunar Orbiters for tracking to evaluate the Manned Space Flight Network tracking stations and Apollo Orbit Determination Program was successful, with three Lunar Orbiters (2, 3, and 5) being tracked simultaneously from August to October 1967. The Lunar Orbiters were all eventually commanded to crash on the Moon before their attitude control gas ran out so they would not present navigational or communications hazards to later Apollo flights. The Lunar Orbiter program was managed by NASA Langley Research Center and involved building and launching 5 spacecraft to the Moon at a total cost of $163 million. So, yes they were the precursors not really dry runs, the exercise necessary to ensure the safety of the manned flights to come. So, no stars again this week. OK, I need to find some more main stream stuff. Next week, guys.

Nancy.


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Ah well. I was thinking of the Saturn rocket and/or the command module that were launched to test their structural integrity before the moon mission. I like your questions, Nancy. I always learn something new and fun!

Have a wonderful week everyone.

Cynthia


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Yes, the lo in my posting referred to lunar orbiter. I didn't post again today as thought there might be a posting from the others later.

I also read and watch anything about space and our explorations. Not sure which came first, my love of SF or science and space. I have been fortunate to vist both Cape Canaveral, err, Kennedy, and The Johnson Space Center in Houston. Also collected most of the patches of the individual space flights when I was into sewing patches on clothing.

One seldom hears of the lunar orbiter debrie left on the moon.

Thanks for an interesting question, Nancy.


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

OK, Bobbie!! Glad you checked back! For Bobbie:
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I was worried I'd bored you all to tears!! Does anyone else find a poetic symmetry in in the timing of Neil Armstrong's death, right after this anniversary? Perhaps the Orbiter has gone ahead again for him......

See ya next week. Nancy.


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Ah, Nancy, you have a romantic spirit. Thank you for the stars and I was not bored. I think we are all inquisitive people and happy to learn new things. I often need clues, sometimes lots of clues, and find the puzzle as satisfying as having the answer.

Cynthia, hope you had a good first day. I remember well those start of the school year days, mostly viewed fondly through the mists of time.


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Sorry I never checked back in. My thinking was way off --- monkeys in space. :)

I enjoyed relearning about the lunar orbiters. Thanks, Nancy.

TM


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